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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1980

Ann J. Walton

Solvents by their very nature are volatile substances and therefore eminently suitable for analysis by GC. The separation of low‐molecular‐weight hydrocarbons on a…

Abstract

Solvents by their very nature are volatile substances and therefore eminently suitable for analysis by GC. The separation of low‐molecular‐weight hydrocarbons on a highly‐polar stationary phase, which consisted of mixed bis‐lactams, was reported by Ravey (157). The packing was claimed to be stable up to 80°C, thus permitting some degree of temperature programming to be used, so that the molecular‐weight range of the samples examined in one analysis could be increased. The specific retention volumes and retention indices at 45°C for a total of 49 normal, branched or halogenated hydrocarbons were measured by Zielinski and Martine (211) for a series of seven stationary phases of similar chain length. These consisted of n‐heptadecance, l‐ hexadecylchloride, l‐hevadeceen,l‐hexadecylbromide, l‐hexadecyliodide, di‐n‐octyl ether and di‐n‐octyl thioether and the procedures described were used in the choice and classification of the stationary phases for GC. Separation of the alkenenaphthene fraction of white spirit was carried out by Leont'eva et al. (120) on a column coated with squalane and operated at 100°C. The carrier gas was helium and fifty three separate peaks were identified and quantified using a flameionisation detector (FID). A squalane capillary column was used by Kumar et al. (115) to identify the hydrocarbon components of a petroleum naphtha fraction (boiling range 40 to 150°C). The analysis was performed under isothermal conditions.

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Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 9 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1981

Ann J. Walton

The liquid extract obtained from the natural cashew nutshell is rich in phenolic substances which are derived from anacardic acid C6H3(OH) (CO2H) (C15H31‐n), where n may…

Abstract

The liquid extract obtained from the natural cashew nutshell is rich in phenolic substances which are derived from anacardic acid C6H3(OH) (CO2H) (C15H31‐n), where n may have values of 0, 2, 4 or 6 and represents various degrees of unsaturation in the aliphatic C15 side‐chain. Industrial decarboxylation of this material affords cardanol C6H4(OH) (C15H31‐n) plus other substituted phenols and polymeric residues. Tyman et al. (197, 198) have studied the analysis of all these products using GC, molecular distillation, TLC and mass spectrometry. After hydrogenation and the formation of the corresponding methyl esters, the products were analysed by GC using glass columns (5ft × 3/16in) packed with acid washed and silanized Diatomite as support material and which was coated with non‐polar stationary phases such as SE30, SE25 or APL, or semi‐polar phases such as 0V17, Dexil 300 or PEGA. Alternatively, the samples were subjected to an acetylation procedure prior to GC examination on columns containing Dexil 300, SE30 or SE52. The GC equipment consisted of a Pye‐Unicam model 104 instrument operated with nitrogen carrier gas (flow rate 45cm3 min−1) and equipped with FID.

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Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

Larry E. Pate and Kendrith M. Rowland

In a recent issue of the Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, Blake strongly criticised an article on organisational change by Blumberg and Wiener for the authors'…

Abstract

In a recent issue of the Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, Blake strongly criticised an article on organisational change by Blumberg and Wiener for the authors' failure thoroughly to review the literature and for missing important material relevant to their study. In response, Blumberg simply stated that they were not aware of the material, because it had appeared in a relatively obscure journal. Indeed, a later writer (Zurcher) criticised one of Blake's papers on the same grounds, and then suggested that an event such as this might easily happen to any of us. Despite their apparent conflict, each of these individuals did agree, of course, that a thorough review of the literature on any given topic is necessary to good research and reporting. Our purpose here is not to pour salt on wounds, but rather to illustrate our raison d'être for presenting the material below.

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Management Decision, vol. 14 no. 0
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Morgan R. Clevenger and Cynthia J. MacGregor

Abstract

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Business and Corporation Engagement with Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-656-1

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Book part
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Nohora García

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Understanding Mattessich and Ijiri: A Study of Accounting Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-841-3

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1979

Keith Newton, Norman Leckie and Barrie O. Pettman

The body of literature in the field now commonly known as the “quality of working life” (QWL) has grown steadily over a period in which the industrialised nations have…

Abstract

The body of literature in the field now commonly known as the “quality of working life” (QWL) has grown steadily over a period in which the industrialised nations have increasingly come to question the role and status of human beings in the modern technological environment. In recent years concern with the nature of work, its impact upon people, and their attitudes towards it, seem to have sharpened. Investigation of, and experimentation with, the qualitative aspects of working life—its ability to confer self‐fulfilment directly, for example, as opposed to being a means of acquiring goods—has gained momentum under the influence of a unique set of economic, social, political and technological factors. The outpouring of books, reports and articles from a wide variety of sources has, not surprisingly, grown apace.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1972

First January 1973 will not only mark the beginning of a New Year but a year which history will mark as a truly momentous one, for this is the year that Britain, after…

Abstract

First January 1973 will not only mark the beginning of a New Year but a year which history will mark as a truly momentous one, for this is the year that Britain, after centuries of absence, re‐enters the framework of Europe as one of the Member‐States of the enlarged European Community. This in itself must make for change on both sides; Britain is so different in outlook from the others, something they too realize and see as an acquisition of strength. There have been other and more limited forms of Continental union, mainly of sovereignty and royal descent. Large regions of France were for centuries under the English Crown and long after they were finally lost, the fleur de lis stayed on the royal coat of arms, until the Treaty of Amiens 1802, when Britain retired behind her sea curtain. The other Continental union was, of course, with Hanover; from here the Germanized descendants of the Stuarts on the female line returned to the throne of their ancestors. This union lasted until 1832 when rules of descent prevented a woman from reigning in Hanover. It is interesting to speculate how different history might have been if only the British Crown and the profits of Tudor and Stuart rule had been maintained in one part of central Europe. However, Britain disentangled herself and built up overwhelming sea power against a largely hostile Europe, of which it was never conceived she could ever be a part, but the wheel of chance turns half‐circle and now, this New Year, she enters into and is bound to a European Community by the Treaty of Rome with ties far stronger, the product of new politico‐economic structures evolved from necessity; in a union which cannot fail to change the whole course of history, especially for this country.

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British Food Journal, vol. 74 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Abstract

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Histories of Economic Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-997-9

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