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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Stacy Wall, Ann Hemingway and Susanna Curtin

The purpose of this paper is to explore how engagement with a healthy tourism “offer” could improve place perceptions through the development of collaborative strategies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how engagement with a healthy tourism “offer” could improve place perceptions through the development of collaborative strategies to promote a well-being destination.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a constructivist grounded theory approach drawing on semi-structured interviews conducted with local members of the council from public health and tourism teams, in a seaside town in the South of England.

Findings

Study findings indicate that the historical roots of the town’s creation have a bearing on the current planning challenges and strategies. Findings confirm that collaborative strategies to engage with a healthy tourism “offer” will improve place perceptions and promote a well-being destination.

Research limitations/implications

This paper concludes that strategies to engage with a healthy tourism offer include interventions to curb alcohol consumption, regenerate areas and promote eudaemonic well-being – which could ultimately improve place perceptions.

Originality/value

This paper proposes that the development of strategic alliances bridged through the construct of well-being could improve place perceptions and promote a well-being destination.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2020

Holly Louise Crossen-White, Ann Hemingway and Adele Ladkin

Social innovation has received increasing attention in recent decades (Agostini et al., 2017). This study aims to consider how the concept has been applied to the issue of…

Abstract

Purpose

Social innovation has received increasing attention in recent decades (Agostini et al., 2017). This study aims to consider how the concept has been applied to the issue of ageing and what can be learnt about effective policy responses.

Design/methodology/approach

The acknowledged lack of understanding generally about the concept makes it timely to undertake a scoping review of the current evidence from social innovation projects associated with older people. A scoping review is considered appropriate where there is a need to “identify and analyse knowledge gaps” (Munn et al., 2018, p. 2).

Findings

Findings from the scoping review indicate that, as yet, the concept of social innovation is not fully defined. However, it has widespread appeal across a diverse range of disciplines and has the potential to generate innovative policy responses.

Originality/value

A key argument identified is the need to change the public’s perceptions of ageing and devise public policies that encourage and nurture age-friendly communities. In summation, although social innovation has the potential to act as a policy driver, but to be effective, it is necessary to devise robust strategies to ensure full user-engagement and active involvement of communities. Therefore, it is the process of delivery that needs urgent attention in any future research into social innovation.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Andrew Harding, Jonathan Parker, Sarah Hean and Ann Hemingway

The purpose of this paper is to provide a supply-side review of policies and practices that impact on the shortage of supply in the contemporary specialist housing market…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a supply-side review of policies and practices that impact on the shortage of supply in the contemporary specialist housing market for older people in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The review is based on a review of academic literature, policy documents, reports and other sources.

Findings

There is a critical conflict between the key social purpose of specialist housing (i.e. living independent of socially provided care) and the values that underpin and ultimately limit the quantity of units in both the social and private sector. In the social sector, government policies prohibit rather than encourage local authorities and housing associations from increasing specialist housing stock. The nature of leasehold tenures in the private sector tends to commodify not only housing stock but also those who use it and therefore acts to instrumentalise housing supply in favour of the profit motive and the focus on the person and her or his needs is largely ignored.

Originality/value

While the shortage of specialist housing is well known, this paper is unique in that it provides a comprehensive and critical supply-side review of the factors that have created such conditions.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Lauren Bishop, Ann Hemingway and Sara Ashencaen Crabtree

UK mental health strategy calls for interventions that empower people to self-manage their condition. In lifestyle coaching, coach and client work collaboratively on…

Abstract

Purpose

UK mental health strategy calls for interventions that empower people to self-manage their condition. In lifestyle coaching, coach and client work collaboratively on positive behaviour change to improve client health. There is debate about the appropriateness of coaching for mental health, yet claims have not been supported with evidence. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and scope of the existing research literature in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

Scoping review.

Findings

The growing evidence base shows positive outcomes of coaching; for instance, symptom reduction, enhanced self-management and achievement of personal goals.

Research limitations/implications

The evidence base is small and of variable quality, offering insights that warrant further exploration.

Practical implications

Coaching not only supports better self-management but also addresses further mental health strategy priorities (such as improved physical health and social functioning). Coaches need not be mental health experts; therefore coaching may be a cost-effective intervention.

Social implications

As mental ill-health prevalence continues to rise despite widespread use of Improving Access to Psychological Therapies and medication, there is a need to explore how novel approaches such as coaching might be integrated into mental healthcare.

Originality/value

This is the first study to collate the evidence on mental health coaching, highlighting its extensive potential, which should be further explored in research and practice.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Ann Lesley Bevan, Heather Hartwell, Ann Hemingway and Rossana Pacheco da Costa Proença

The potential for the foodservice industry to be part of a public health strategy has led to a new understanding of this sector’s role in a wider interdisciplinary health…

Abstract

Purpose

The potential for the foodservice industry to be part of a public health strategy has led to a new understanding of this sector’s role in a wider interdisciplinary health environment. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the influence of the foodscape on fruit and vegetable choice by staff in a higher educational setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Foodscape mapping of fruit and vegetable provision on campus was conducted to provide context. Two focus groups with staff and two interviews with foodservice managers took place to gain depth of understanding. Thematic analysis was conducted to allow for pattern and meaning to emerge.

Findings

Results demonstrate two main overarching themes; personal influence and food operator influence that impact on fruit and vegetable choice. In addition connectivity, perceptions of freshness, food quality and display seemed to be strong categories emerging from the data. Interestingly, this research indicated that consumers were more likely to eat fruit and vegetables when part of a composite dish than if served separately.

Practical implications

Providing a positive foodscape to enhance availability of fruit and vegetables may be challenging but helpful towards health promotion. Nevertheless, no “nudging” can control choice made by individuals, responsibility for healthy selection must always remain personal.

Originality/value

Knowledge gained by this pilot study will add to the body of literature and evidence base for further research while contributing to foodservice strategies which may promote increased fruit and vegetable consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Ann Hemingway and Eleanor Jack

The purpose of this paper is to report on a three year research project exploring the impacts of an intervention seeking to reduce social isolation in older people.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a three year research project exploring the impacts of an intervention seeking to reduce social isolation in older people.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used qualitative research methods and a participative approach to facilitate the generation of the research objectives and process. Participant observation and individual/focus group interviews were used to collect data from 100 participants.

Findings

Overall the perceived benefits for attendees of attending the friendship clubs fell into three key areas: improved well being, social relations and mental and physical health.

Research limitations/implications

A weakness of the participant observation method includes the possibility that the presence of the researcher influenced the findings. The process of gaining different data sets (observation, interviews and focus groups) and checking findings with another researcher and the research participants as the study progressed reduced the likelihood of this bias occurring. This study only considered individuals who attended the clubs. There are many who may not get this opportunity and the issue of how to engage with them through this type of intervention is not addressed.

Originality/value

This study adds to the literature to guide practice and service provision as it introduces the finding that even when living with their families, older people can still feel socially isolated. In addition, this study found that club members and volunteers viewed themselves as assets for each other, offering support, advice and friendship – an important finding for service commissioners and providers.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Hugues Séraphin, Vanessa G.B. Gowreesunkar and Richard Teare

The purpose of this paper is to profile the WHATT theme issue “What marketing strategy for destinations with a negative image?” with reference to the experiences of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to profile the WHATT theme issue “What marketing strategy for destinations with a negative image?” with reference to the experiences of the theme editor and writing team.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses structured questions to enable the theme editors to reflect on the rationale for the theme issue question, the starting point, the selection of the contributors and material and the editorial process.

Findings

This paper provides insights and practical suggestions in response to the theme issue question from different academic and professional backgrounds in fields as diverse as marketing, tourism, economics and heritage management.

Practical implications

The theme issue outcomes provide lines of enquiry for others to explore and reinforce the value of WHATT’s approach to collaborative working and writing.

Originality/value

The collaborative work reported in this theme issue offers a unified but contrarian response to the theme’s strategic question. Taken together, the papers provide a range of options for destination marketing organizations in response to the issues highlighted.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Ron Iphofen

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Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Ruth Elwood Martin, Debra Hanson, Christine Hemingway, Vivian Ramsden, Jane Buxton, Alison Granger‐Brown, Lara‐Lisa Condello, Ann Macaulay, Patti Janssen and T. Gregory Hislop

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, by incarcerated women who were members of a prison participatory health research team, of a survey tool regarding…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, by incarcerated women who were members of a prison participatory health research team, of a survey tool regarding homelessness and housing, the survey findings and recommendations for policy.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was developed by incarcerated women in a minimum/medium security women's prison in Canada. Associations were examined between socio‐demographic factors and reports of difficulty finding housing upon release, homelessness contributing to a return to crime, and a desire for relocation to another city upon release. Open‐ended questions were examined to look for recurrent themes and to illuminate the survey findings.

Findings

In total, 83 women completed the survey, a 72 per cent response rate. Of the 71 who were previously incarcerated, 56 per cent stated that homelessness contributed to their return to crime. Finding housing upon release was a problem for 63 per cent and 34 per cent desired relocation to another city upon release. Women indicated that a successful housing plan should incorporate flexible progressive staged housing.

Research limitations/implications

The present study focuses only on incarcerated women but could be expanded in future to include men.

Practical implications

Incarcerated women used the findings to create a housing proposal for prison leavers and created a resource database of the limited housing resources for women prison leavers.

Social implications

Lack of suitable housing is a major factor leading to recidivism. This study highlights the reality of the cycle of homelessness, poverty, crime for survival, street‐life leading to drug use and barriers to health, education and employment that incarcerated women face.

Originality/value

Housing is a recognized basic determinant of health. No previous studies have used participatory research to address homelessness in a prison population.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 8 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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