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1 – 10 of 596

Abstract

Details

Developing Self and Self-Concepts in Early Childhood Education and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-843-0

Abstract

Details

Tribal Wisdom for Business Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-288-0

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Silvia Inés Monserrat, Jo Ann Duffy, Miguel R. Olivas‐Luján, John M. Miller, Ann Gregory, Suzy Fox, Terri R. Lituchy, Betty Jane Punnett and Neusa María Bastos F. Santos

The purpose of this paper is to compare women's mentoring experience in nine countries within the Americas, and to explore linkages between personal characteristics, mentoring…

1454

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare women's mentoring experience in nine countries within the Americas, and to explore linkages between personal characteristics, mentoring practices, mentoring functions, and consequences of being mentee.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 1,146 successful women are questioned about their mentoring experiences as a mentee: 105 from Argentina, 210 from Brazil, 199 from Canada, 84 from Chile, 232 from Mexico, 126 from the USA, and 190 from three countries in the West Indies (Barbados, Jamaica, and St Vincent).

Findings

Most of the women have more than one mentor. Across all countries mentoring practices are more strongly linked to career mentoring function while the age and gender of the mentor are more strongly linked to psychosocial mentoring. Mentoring from the perspective of mentee has the same directional relationship with situational and individual variables, but the significance of those relationships vary by country. A possible cultural difference is detected between Spanish and non‐Spanish speaking countries on the issue of mentoring practice.

Research limitations/implications

The fact that the paper focuses only on successful women in this paper means the findings are not necessarily generalizable to other groups of women or men. The paper is also limited because mentoring functions are constrained to two: psychosocial and career. There may be more functions that mentoring could fulfill for the mentee.

Practical implications

Companies' interest in fostering mentoring among their members, particularly women, should be aware that different mentoring functions are influenced by different factors. For example, formal mentoring programs appear to have a greater impact on career mentoring functions than on psychosocial mentoring functions. To support women in their careers, companies should institute formal mentoring programs; this is especially important in South American countries. Moreover, mentoring programs must be designed to be adaptive since the analyses indicated that there are significant differences by country in terms of many mentoring issues.

Originality/value

In the literature review, the paper finds linkages between culture, mentoring practices, characteristics of mentors and mentees, and mentoring functions, but no evidence that these linkages have been studied with a group of professionally successful women from different American countries, particularly non‐English speaking American countries.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Pamela Lirio, Terri R. Lituchy, Silvia Ines Monserrat, Miguel R. Olivas‐Lujan, Jo Ann Duffy, Suzy Fox, Ann Gregory, B.J. Punnett and Neusa Santos

The purpose of this paper is to examine career‐life issues of successful women in the Americas.

4186

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine career‐life issues of successful women in the Americas.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 30 interviews were conducted with successful women in Canada, Argentina and Mexico. Themes were pulled from the interview transcripts for each country, analyzed and then compared across countries, looking at universalities and differences of experiences.

Findings

The women in all three countries conveyed more subjective measures of career success, such as contributing to society and learning in their work, with Canada and Mexico particularly emphasizing receiving recognition as a hallmark of career success.

Practical implications

This research provides insight into the experiences of successful women in the Americas, which can inform the career development of women in business.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the literature on women's careers, highlighting successful women's experiences across cultures and in an under‐researched area: Latin America.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Doris H. Kincade, Ann Redwine and Gregory R. Hancock

Examines the consumer behaviours which result when an apparelproduct fails and the situations of seeking, receiving, and satisfactionwith redress, in relation to the consumer′s…

Abstract

Examines the consumer behaviours which result when an apparel product fails and the situations of seeking, receiving, and satisfaction with redress, in relation to the consumer′s intent to repurchase a brand and to revisit a store. Results indicate a definite relationship and have direct financial implications for retailers and apparel manufacturers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Jo Ann Duffy, Suzy Fox, Betty Jane Punnett, Ann Gregory, Terri Lituchy, Silvia Inés Monserrat, Miguel R. Olivas‐Luján, Neusa Maria Bastos F. Santos and John Miller

The intent of this cross‐national research is to study the personal and cultural characteristics of successful professional women. High‐achieving women may share certain personal…

2081

Abstract

Purpose

The intent of this cross‐national research is to study the personal and cultural characteristics of successful professional women. High‐achieving women may share certain personal characteristics, beliefs, and experiences, regardless of the countries in which they live. However, every individual is socialized within a particular national culture, and may be expected to share certain values and expectations with other members of that culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Over 1,100 professionally “successful women” (including high‐level managers, entrepreneurs, academics, government personnel, and professionals) and 531 undergraduate business students in nine countries – Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Mexico, the USA and the West Indies (Barbados, Jamaica, St. Vincent, and the Grenadines) completed surveys containing two sets of variables: national/cultural (collectivism/individualism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance) and personal (self‐efficacy, locus of control, need for achievement).

Findings

There were significant differences in the personal characteristics between successful women and the student comparison samples, with successful women consistently higher on self‐efficacy and need for achievement, and more internal on locus of control. There were some significant but smaller than expected differences in cultural characteristics between national samples.

Originality/value

This contrast of successful women living in the Americas provides new insights for managers of international companies seeking to be gender inclusive.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 29 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 July 2007

Betty Jane Punnett, Jo Ann Duffy, Suzy Fox, Ann Gregory, Terri Lituchy, John Miller, Silvia Inés Monserrat, Miguel R. Olivas‐Luján and Neusa Maria Bastos F. Santos

This project aims to examine levels of career and life satisfaction among successful women in nine countries in the Americas.

2856

Abstract

Purpose

This project aims to examine levels of career and life satisfaction among successful women in nine countries in the Americas.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured survey and in‐depth interviews were used, and a variety of occupations, demographics, and personality characteristics assessed – 1,146 successful women from nine countries in the USA responded the survey: 105 from Argentina, 210 from Brazil, 199 from Canada, 84 from Chile, 232 from Mexico, 126 from the USA, and 190 from three countries in the West Indies (Barbados, Jamaica, SVG).

Findings

Results show no differences in satisfaction based on occupation or country and most demographic variables investigated did not have a significant relationship with satisfaction. Age had a small, significant, relationship, with satisfaction increasing with age; married women were significantly more satisfied than single women. Higher scores on self efficacy and need for achievement, and a greater internal locus of control were all related to higher levels of satisfaction. The relationship between career satisfaction and general life satisfaction was stronger in Argentina and Chile that in the other countries.

Originality/value

Extends understanding of professional success and satisfaction, in terms of demographic variables and personality, as well as geographically.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2004

Ann Williams and Eve Gregory

Educational statistics in Britain make depressing reading. Recent surveys show that 80% of children from professional families gain university degrees compared with 14% from…

Abstract

Educational statistics in Britain make depressing reading. Recent surveys show that 80% of children from professional families gain university degrees compared with 14% from working class homes:1 that black children are more likely to leave school with fewer academic qualifications even though they enter the system showing promise: that only a small minority of children from comprehensive schools2 gain places at Oxbridge although 90% of the population attend such schools: that a mere 4% of medical and dentistry students come from working class backgrounds etc. In spite of John Major’s3 optimistic insistence that Britain has become a classless society, it would appear that class differences in educational performance are not disappearing. On the contrary, a recent OECD4 survey, based on data gathered from 16,000 people born in 1958 and 1970 shows that the detrimental effects of inequality of opportunity are actually growing and that the opportunities gap between those from different social backgrounds is no better for those born in 1970 than it was for those born a generation earlier in 1958.

Details

Ethnographies of Educational and Cultural Conflicts: Strategies and Resolutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-275-7

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Lori A. DeMatteo

As the workforce evolves in the twenty‐first century, more women areentering higher‐level management positions. The traditional hierarchicalstructure associated with…

1411

Abstract

As the workforce evolves in the twenty‐first century, more women are entering higher‐level management positions. The traditional hierarchical structure associated with male‐dominated management ranks is inadequate to accommodate properly this trend. Looks at alternative management structure theories which support the view of a genderless management structure. Recommends that managers should begin to adopt an androgynous style which will not only foster a blend of so‐called masculine and feminine behaviours, but also lead to better managers.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Dan J. Bye

905

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

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