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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Glenna Sumner and Anita Williams

This paper aims to explain the economic impact of the change in the degree of contract enforcement in the USA since August 2008. This change, from solid enforcement (hard…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain the economic impact of the change in the degree of contract enforcement in the USA since August 2008. This change, from solid enforcement (hard contracts), to uncertain enforcement (fuzzy contracts), is a result of political expediency during an economic crisis. The purpose of the paper is to point out that political decisions are not made in an economic vacuum, and that there is an economic impact to the move away from hard contracts.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a time value of money, net present value approach with specific emphasis on the investor's adjustment to the required rate of return in the face of uncertain contract enforcement. Both closed and open economic systems are addressed.

Findings

The paper finds that in the shift to a fuzzy contract environment, investors will increase the required rate of return on future investment contracts, thereby lowering the value of those assets. Both individually, and in the aggregate, asset values will fall.

Research limitations/implications

The paper makes no attempt to evaluate reasons for or against the institutional changes that produced the move to fuzzy contracts. The paper examines only the resulting impact of the change on asset valuations.

Practical implications

Reducing the certainty of contract enforcement reduces asset valuations and investment.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills a need to be cognizant of the fact that actions of politicians can have unintended economic consequences, using the specific example of the shift in contract enforcement in the USA since August 2008.

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Heather M. Caruso and Anita Williams Woolley

To reap the value in diverse teams, leaders may try to manipulate structural interdependence – through task design – to foster synergistic collaboration. However…

Abstract

To reap the value in diverse teams, leaders may try to manipulate structural interdependence – through task design – to foster synergistic collaboration. However, ambiguity about the nature and appropriate intersections of members’ unique and valuable cognitive perspectives can make it difficult to fully anticipate collaborative activity in task design. Here, teams need emergent interdependence – members must develop the desire and expectation to work interdependently for the benefit of the work. We therefore present a model of how leaders can promote emergent interdependence for diverse team success, identifying key antecedents and discussing psychological safety as a condition which can enhance their efforts.

Details

Diversity and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-053-7

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

James Barth and John Jahera

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264

Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Abstract

Details

Diversity and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-053-7

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Anita Whiting, David L. Williams and Joe Hair

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281

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Anita Whiting, David Williams and Joe F. Hair

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302

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Alison Palmer and Anita Bosch

The purpose of this paper is to identify the underlying organisational features, according to the gendered organisation theory, that have contributed to high levels of…

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1021

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the underlying organisational features, according to the gendered organisation theory, that have contributed to high levels of representation of women executives, contrary to the trend in the South African financial services industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical realist approach was employed, using semi-structured interviews, based on a theoretical framework of the gendered organisation. Data were aligned to the theoretical levels of critical realism.

Findings

The research found that the pool from which the successful candidates were appointed was influenced by two features. The first was the perceived attractiveness of the organisation as an employer, composed of organisational prestige, opportunity for altruism, and the sex of the CEO. The second was the role of the CEO as gatekeeper, most notably the CEO’s network and the impact of the similar-to-me paradigm during selection.

Originality/value

The utilisation of critical realism as an approach allowed for organisational features embedded in the theory of the gendered organisation to be identified and gives an indication of how the number of women at executive management level may be increased. The salient factors are the role the woman CEO played in the inclusion of more women at the executive level by virtue of her being a woman, and the attractiveness of the organisation to women employees. Organisational features identified were gendered towards the feminine.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Anita Whiting, David L. Williams and Joe Hair

The purpose of this study is to investigate motives for engaging in electronic word of mouth (eWOM) about organizations on social media sites. This study explores motives…

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1493

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate motives for engaging in electronic word of mouth (eWOM) about organizations on social media sites. This study explores motives for posting positive eWOM and motives for posting negative eWOM. It also investigates whether existing WOM frameworks adequately capture consumers’ motives for spreading eWOM within the context of social media. This study seeks to confirm established motives in literature while also identifying new motives specific to social media.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was conducted using the critical incident technique. In all, 64 positive incidents and 60 negative incidents were analyzed.

Findings

This study provides a typology for understanding consumers’ motivations for engaging in positive and negative WOM within the context of social media. Four new motives for sharing eWOM are identified; eight established WOM motives are re-confirmed; and new subcategories for eWOM motives are proposed. The study also finds that further refinement of WOM motives and scales within a social media context is needed.

Research limitations/implications

An integrated conceptual framework of both positive and negative motives is developed to illustrate a more comprehensive model of motives of eWOM within social media. Managerial implications for managing negative eWOM and amplifying positive eWOM are discussed. A limitation is that the study is exploratory in nature.

Originality/value

This study identifies new motives for sharing eWOM, re-labels existing WOM and eWOM motives with more descriptive and comprehensive titles and confirms established WOM and eWOM motives within the context of social media. This study is conducted across multiple firms and industries, leading to more generalizable results.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Abir Hichri

This paper aims to draw on the agency theory to examine the relationship between corporate governance and integrated reporting on a sample of 120 listed French companies…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to draw on the agency theory to examine the relationship between corporate governance and integrated reporting on a sample of 120 listed French companies making up the SBF 120 Index during the period 2016–2019.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted in the present study consists of the hypothetico-deductive approach. Thus, as part of this quantitative approach, the authors aim at investigating the hypotheses concerning the impact of corporate governance mechanisms on integrated reporting. Moreover, the applied data are analyzed using the multiple linear regressions.

Findings

The finding of this study is that the cognitive diversity and audit committees have a positive and significant effect on integrated reporting. However, the chief executive officer’s duality and the board’s size have a positive and non-significant effect on integrated reporting.

Originality/value

In fact, this study contributes to the literature on the practices of integrated reporting. Faced with the rarity of studies linking the corporate governance mechanisms and the integrated reporting, this study makes a huge contribution to the determinants of integrated reporting.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Women in Leadership 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-064-8

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