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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Loretta M. Isaac, Elaine Buggy, Anita Sharma, Athena Karberis, Kim M. Maddock and Kathryn M. Weston

The patient-centred management of people with cognitive impairment admitted to acute health care facilities can be challenging. The TOP5 intervention utilises carers 

Abstract

Purpose

The patient-centred management of people with cognitive impairment admitted to acute health care facilities can be challenging. The TOP5 intervention utilises carers’ expert biographical and social knowledge of the patient to facilitate personalised care. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether involvement of carers in the TOP5 initiative could improve patient care and healthcare delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

A small-scale longitudinal study was undertaken in two wards of one acute teaching hospital. The wards admitted patients with cognitive impairment, aged 70 years and over, under geriatrician care. Data for patient falls, allocation of one-on-one nurses (“specials”), and length-of-stay (LOS) over 38 months, including baseline, pilot, and establishment phases, were analysed. Surveys of carers and nursing staff were undertaken.

Findings

There was a significant reduction in number of falls and number of patients allocated “specials” over the study period, but no statistically significant reduction in LOS. A downward trend in complaints related to communication issues was identified. All carers (n=43) completing the feedback survey were satisfied or very satisfied that staff supported their role as information provider. Most carers (90 per cent) felt that the initiative had a positive impact and 80 per cent felt that their loved one benefitted. Six months after implementation of the initiative, 80 per cent of nurses agreed or strongly agreed that it was now easier to relate to carers of patients with cognitive impairment. At nine-ten months, this increased to 100 per cent.

Originality/value

Actively engaging carers in management of people with cognitive impairment may improve the patient, staff, and carer journeys, and may improve outcomes for patient care and service delivery.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Anita Sharma and Karminder Ghuman

This paper aims to enable the application of Value Proposition Canvas and Business Model Canvas to evaluate an opportunity; understand the commonalities and differences…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

This paper aims to enable the application of Value Proposition Canvas and Business Model Canvas to evaluate an opportunity; understand the commonalities and differences between social and commercial enterprises; and recognize the challenges related to the paradox of the social mission and the financial/economic logic.

Case overview/synopsis

Neha Arora demonstrated exceptional capabilities of defying the social stigma associated with People with Disabilities (PwDs) to establish Planet Abled, a first in the world venture to provide accessible leisure excursions to PwDs. This entrepreneurial initiative enabling group and solo travel for PwDs as inclusive tourism has created the possibility of social sustainability by bringing change in the lives of PwDs and their family members by ignoring either the insensitive or overprotective societal attitudes and lack of infrastructure concerning travel for PwDs. Its potential growth qualifies for scaling-up, but it can also attract the existing big travel solution providers to enter this domain. Considering these facts, Neha faces multiple dilemmas: How can she sustain and scale up the early momentum created by her enterprise? How can she resolve the challenges related to the paradox of the social mission and the financial/ economic logic while scaling-up Planet Abled?

Complexity/Academic level

This case study is suitable for both undergraduate or graduate-level programs in the area of entrepreneurship.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Roberta Adami, Andrea Carosi and Anita Sharma

This paper aims to study long-term savings accumulation in the UK. The authors use cross-sectional information from the extensive data set of the Family Resources Survey…

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584

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study long-term savings accumulation in the UK. The authors use cross-sectional information from the extensive data set of the Family Resources Survey to compare long-term saving amongst different ethnic groups with the control group, the native population. The paper reflects on whether different groups are more likely to suffer poverty in retirement.

Design/methodology/approach

In this analysis, the authors apply the life-cycle framework to explain saving profiles. This theoretical model has been used extensively in the field of economics and can be applied to empirical studies to examine changes in income and saving patterns over the life-course. The framework contends that individuals make savings decisions to smooth consumption over different phases of their life-cycle.

Findings

The findings indicate that socio-economic factors are key elements in determining whether individuals plan for retirement if factors are controlled for the differences in saving behaviours between ethnic minorities and the control population decrease considerably. Asian women, with good education and social standing, display greater saving rates than the control group, while the socio-economic disadvantage suffered especially by Pakistani and Bangladeshi women is key to their inability to save long-term. High levels of poverty in retirement are more likely to be caused by the interaction of low levels of education, part-time work and long spells of unemployment than by ethnicity.

Originality/value

The important contribution to the debate on savings by ethnic minorities is the extension of the life-cycle model to specific sections of the population and to proffer new insights into their saving/dis-saving patterns and ultimately their welfare in retirement.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Keywords

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Abstract

Subject area

Market development.

Study level/applicability

This case is intended to be used in strategic management, operations management for both undergraduate and graduate courses. It can also be used for value innovation and market development.

Case overview

This case focuses on market development by Patanjali, a fast-growing organization crossing US$1bn of sales in five years of time span and declaring a target of doubling this figure in the financial year 2016-2017 (to reach US$1,500m). The prime focus of Patanjali is the health food segment based on herbal and Ayurveda science through the use of organically grown agricultural produce by integrating the associated value chains while radically benefitting all the stakeholders in a two-way process as suppliers as well as buyers/consumers. The fundamental context of the case is associated with the value chain development in terms of value addition on the basis of the organizational and leadership values in all the elements of the value chain of Patanjali products starting from suppliers to customers. The case emphasizes the role of the Patanjali Food & Herbal park in the value chain. Patanjali Food & Herbal Park is constantly striving for nation building more than profit accumulation. They have created a sustainable business benefiting all the stakeholders. The backbone of the Patanjali Food & Herbal Park lies in robust backward linkage and forward linkage. The context of the case presents an account of how the values based integration of the value chain is a strategic advantage and safeguards an organization from business environment threats.

Expected learning outcomes

The context of the case presents an account of how values based integration of the value chain is a strategic advantage and safeguard an organization from business environment threats. The case has a deep-rooted theoretical association with models like Porter’s Five Forces model on the one hand and also exemplifies how an organization can use blue ocean strategy through value-based value innovation. The context of the Black Swan perspective also emerges in the narration.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Neeraj Kaushik, Anita Sharma and Veerander Kumar Kaushik

In developing countries like India, changing economic and social condition necessitated working of women irrespective of their religion, class or social status. But at the…

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5127

Abstract

Purpose

In developing countries like India, changing economic and social condition necessitated working of women irrespective of their religion, class or social status. But at the same time, it raised number of related issues like managing for family adjustment, working environment, etc. The purpose of this paper is to study gender issues like gender stereotype, gender discrimination and sexual harassment in the context of Indian environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was developed to collect primary data from 500 firms in India. The data collected through questionnaire was coded and tabulated keeping in context with the objective of the study and was analysed by calculating frequencies, factor analysis and one way analysis of variance.

Findings

Results elucidate seven job-related factors (infrastructure, HR functions, organisational climate, legal pursuit, empowerment, training and development and ethical concerns) and two individual factors (interpersonal and mindset) that are considered essential for women employees in Indian organisations. Analysis indicates that though age and level of management has no significant effect on these factors but male and female respondents differ significantly on their opinion regarding these issues.

Research limitations/implications

The respondents in present study have been taken mainly from service sector, manufacturing sector and education sector, thus the study looks at only organised sector. The research work suffers from the usual limitations of survey research method.

Practical implications

With women becoming an integral part of the workforce, managers must examine their reliance on stereotypical views concerning women. Gender is a socio-cultural phenomenon and organisations are a key aspect of a given culture. Organisational analysis needs to take into account the relationship between gender, gender stereotypes and organisational life.

Originality/value

The paper studies gender issues of gender stereotype, gender discrimination and sexual harassment on a pan India basis covering various sectors and contribute to the subject from Indian perspective.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Shwadhin Sharma and Anita Khadka

Drawing on the taxonomy of patient empowerment and a sense of community (SoC), the purpose of this paper is to analyze the factors that impact the intention of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the taxonomy of patient empowerment and a sense of community (SoC), the purpose of this paper is to analyze the factors that impact the intention of the individual to continue using online social health support community for their chronic disease management.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey design was used to collect the data from multiple online social health support groups related to chronic disease management. The survey yielded a total of 246 usable responses.

Findings

The primary findings from this study indicate that the informational support – not the nurturant support such as emotional, network, and esteem support – are the major types of support people are seeking from an online social health support community. This research also found that patient empowerment and SoC would positively impact their intention to continue using the online health community.

Research limitations/implications

This study utilized a survey design method may limit precision and realism. Also, there is the self-selection bias as the respondents self-selected themselves to take the survey.

Practical implications

The findings can help the community managers or webmasters to design strategies for the promotion and diffusion of online social health group among patient of chronic disease. Those strategies should focus on patient’s empowerment through action facilitating and social support and through creating a SoC.

Originality/value

An innovative research model integrates patient empowerment and a SoC to study patient’s chronic disease management through online social health groups to fill the existing research gap.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2018

Gabriela Leiß and Anita Zehrer

The purpose of this paper is to explore how intergenerational communication between predecessors and successors impacts on the entrepreneurial family and the family…

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1414

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how intergenerational communication between predecessors and successors impacts on the entrepreneurial family and the family business, and aims at developing a typology of communication patterns in family business succession.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on grounded theory methodology, ten in-depth narrative family interviews with predecessors and successors were conducted, transcribed and analyzed. The qualitative data analysis followed a hermeneutic approach focusing on in situ language phenomena such as positioning, syntax, semantics and interaction patterns.

Findings

The reconstruction of the interviewees’ subjective realities resulted in a theoretical concept with four communication types, varying between continuity and change, and between relatedness and autonomy. Given the fact that succession is not a single event but a long-lasting process, the typology can be transferred into a dynamic model for succession comprising three consecutive stages: intergenerational transmission, independent acquisition and finally interdependent development of the family firm heritage.

Research limitations/implications

First, the results are based upon a small sample size (n=10) that should not be generalized to the population of family businesses at large. Hence, to complete the overall picture, a broader survey among family-run firms by means of an extended qualitative or even a quantitative survey would be most valuable to generate more objective data. Another shortcoming is that the authors only investigated intra-family succession and challenges. No attention was paid to the various opportunities of external succession of family businesses, such as management buyout, management buy in, external management or liquidation.

Practical implications

Understanding the sociological and psychological aspects of communication helps family firms to identify characteristics in communication during their succession process. First, the knowledge that various communication types are highly dependent upon the personal interactions among the parties involved, might be an asset for family firms which are handing over their company in the future. Second, knowledge on different communication types might raise awareness for and prevent from conflicts and emotional relationships during the firm succession and thus function as a strategic advantage.

Social implications

Following a sustainable and responsible strategy, family firms can be regarded as the pillars of our economy. Yet, they can be compared to an endangered species often not surviving the transfer from one generation to the next. Succession seems to be a delicate stage in a company’s lifecycle, the failure of which threatens thousands of jobs every year. When it comes to the survival rate of family firms, the increase of communicative and reflexive competence as it is addressed by this paper, is one of the key factors helping the family to deal with conflicts and thus strengthen their self-efficacy.

Originality/value

The dynamic succession model presented in this paper gives experts a comprehensive insight into the inner logic of entrepreneurial families reconstructed by their communicative patterns. Understanding the different dimensions of succession lays the foundation for consulting and supporting family members in transition processes helping them to cope with intergenerational ambivalences and find solutions that are both beneficial for the individuals as well as for the business.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 July 2020

Anita Zehrer and Gabriela Leiß

This paper aims to explore the pertinent issues, barriers and pitfalls of intergenerational communication in business families during their leadership succession period.

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2804

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the pertinent issues, barriers and pitfalls of intergenerational communication in business families during their leadership succession period.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on relational leadership theory, the paper makes use of an action research approach using a qualitative single case study to investigate communication barriers and pitfalls in business transition.

Findings

Through action research, interventions were taken in the underlying case, which increased the consciousness, as well as the personal and social competencies of the business family. Thus, business families stuck in ambivalent entanglement understand their underlying motives and needs within the change process, get into closer contact with their emotional barriers and communication hindrances, which is a prerequisite for any change, and break the succession iceberg phenomenon.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should undertake multiple case studies to validate and/or modify the qualitative methods used in this action research to increase the validity and generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

Given the large number of business families in transition, our study shows the beneficial effects action research might have on business families’ communication behavior along a change process. The findings might help other business families to understand the value of action research for such underlying challenges and decrease communication barriers.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies to have addressed intergenerational communication of business families using an action research approach.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Md. Aftab Uddin, Monowar Mahmood and Luo Fan

Adopting a multi-level research approach, this study aims to investigate the impact of employee engagement on team performance. It further explores the mediating effects…

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6305

Abstract

Purpose

Adopting a multi-level research approach, this study aims to investigate the impact of employee engagement on team performance. It further explores the mediating effects of employee commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour on the employee engagement–team performance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The study follows a quantitative method. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire survey using snowball and convenience sampling. Descriptive statistics and bi-variate correlation analyses were conducted using SmartPLS 2 and SPSS 20 software, and subsequently, a structural equation model was developed.

Findings

The study suggests that better employee engagement could improve team performance in organizational contexts. Organizational commitment and citizenship behaviour played a mediating role in the employee engagement–team performance relationship. Further research on the meditating effects of demographic factors is suggested to advance knowledge in the employee engagement domain.

Research limitations/implications

Based on premises of the social exchange theory and the employee stewardship theory, the study integrates multi-level variables to impact of individual employee engagement on organizational team performance. The findings of the study contribute to the existing literature by providing empirical evidence of the impact of individual-level variables on team-level performance. It reiterates the need for multi-level modelling of organizational behavioural research.

Originality/value

The study used a multi-theoretical approach to investigate team performance in organizational contexts, i.e. individual employee engagement, organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour. This integrated model using predictors from multiple levels demonstrates that team performance could be enhanced from interactions of different factors of individual behaviour.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Birgit Pikkemaat and Anita Zehrer

This paper aims to explore the pertinent issues of innovation and service experiences in family firms in the tourism industry, which are mostly small- and medium-sized enterprises.

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2734

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the pertinent issues of innovation and service experiences in family firms in the tourism industry, which are mostly small- and medium-sized enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual paper, building on social identity theory, undertakes a thorough review of the relevant literature before developing propositions regarding innovation and service experiences for small family firms in the tourism industry.

Findings

Small tourism family firms are faced with deficits in strategic orientation and innovation, and cooperation seems to be a means to overcome size deficits in family-run businesses. Customers integrated into the service experience enhance innovative developments and foster innovation in small tourism firms. As a prerequisite, the service experience must be appropriately managed by collecting and evaluating relevant data on customers’ needs, expectations and satisfaction. An open-minded and consumer-focused market-driven strategy seems to be an advantage.

Practical implications

Future research should undertake empirical studies to validate and/or modify the propositions presented in this conceptual paper.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies to have addressed the relationship between service experiences and innovation for family-run small businesses in the tourism industry.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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