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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Izabela Szymanska, Anita Blanchard and Kaleigh Kuhns

The purpose of this paper is to focus on efforts of a large department store to increase its business advantage by boosting innovation. The first broad research question…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on efforts of a large department store to increase its business advantage by boosting innovation. The first broad research question of this study investigated how the family and non-family members influence the process of organizational change aimed at greater innovativeness in a successful retail family business. The second research question was how the family enterprise handles the tension between change stemming from innovation and progress and the need for stability continuity tradition and maintenance of family control.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is an in-depth inductive analysis (Glaser and Strauss, 1967) of an important and unique case (Yin, 1994).

Findings

The results of the study indicate that the push toward innovation was initiated by family members and that it was focused largely on creating structural support for the innovation activity keeping this activity tightly under monitoring and control by upper management. The attempts at equipping employees with innovation-relevant decision-making authority or consulting the clients in designing novel projects were absent, while the move to change the organizational culture was measured.

Originality/value

This study makes several contributions to the academic literature. It offers an empirical assessment of the effects of emotional attachment and ownership concentration on innovation management, a phenomenon postulated by Kotlar et al. (2016). These two characteristics pulled innovation-boosting initiative in opposite directions creating a unique dynamics. This research also provides an example of organizational identity that hinders the innovation process in the context of a family business that survived and developed over generations.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Anita L. Blanchard and Andrew McBride

Meetings are ubiquitous at work. Therefore, understanding what makes meetings effective (or not) is important. Entitativity (i.e., the “group-ness” of a meeting) may…

Abstract

Meetings are ubiquitous at work. Therefore, understanding what makes meetings effective (or not) is important. Entitativity (i.e., the “group-ness” of a meeting) may theoretically explain when some meetings are effective. That is, when meeting participants perceive a high enough level of group-ness in their meeting, then they begin to enact the processes to create a successful meeting and experience the outcomes of a successful meeting. The authors propose a model connecting the characteristics of successful face-to-face (FtF) meetings to entitativity and extrapolate this model to online meetings. Specifically, the authors interpret well-researched characteristics and practices of meetings (e.g., using an agenda and meeting punctuality) to be examples of well-established entitativity antecedents (e.g., creating similarity of goals and establishing meeting boundaries). That is, using an agenda creates effective meetings because it focuses members’ attention on common goals. Therefore, entitativity may be an explanatory mechanism for successful meetings. The authors examine the unique challenges of online meetings, which are growing in number. The authors note that entitativity may be harder to establish in online meetings making successful online meetings more difficult. Characteristics of online meetings (e.g., focusing on the few shared documents which may focus members on goals) that may promote success. The authors propose further theoretical work as well as suggest strategies that can be used to increase entitativity in FtF and online meetings.

Details

Managing Meetings in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-227-0

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Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2014

David A. Askay, Anita Blanchard and Jerome Stewart

This chapter examines the affordances of social media to understand how groups are experienced through social media. Specifically, the chapter presents a theoretical model…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter examines the affordances of social media to understand how groups are experienced through social media. Specifically, the chapter presents a theoretical model to understand how affordances of social media promote or suppress entitativity.

Methodology

Participants (N=265) were recruited through snowball sampling to answer questions about their recent Facebook status updates. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine the goodness of fit for our model.

Findings

We validate a model of entitativity as it occurs through the affordances offered by social media. Participant’s knowledge that status update responders were an interacting group outside of Facebook affected their perceptions of interactivity in the responses. Interactivity and history of interactions were the strongest predictors of status update entitativity. Further, status update entitativity had positive relationships with overall Facebook entitativity as well as group identity.

Practical implications

To encourage group identity through social media, managers need to increase employees’ perceptions of entitativity, primarily by enabling employees to see the interactions of others and to contribute content in social media platforms.

Originality/value

This is the only study we know of that empirically examines how groups are experienced through social media. Additionally, we draw from an affordance perspective, which helps to generalize our findings beyond the site of our study.

Details

Social Media in Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-901-0

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Abstract

Details

Managing Meetings in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-227-0

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2013

Abstract

Details

Social Media in Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-901-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Audrone Glosiene

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 62 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Deborah K. King

As the First Lady, Michelle Obama stated that she had a number of priorities but that the first year would be mainly about supporting her two girls in their transitions to…

Abstract

As the First Lady, Michelle Obama stated that she had a number of priorities but that the first year would be mainly about supporting her two girls in their transitions to their new life in the White House. Her choice to be mom-in-chief drew unusually intense and rather puzzling, scrutiny. The chapter briefly discusses the range of reactions along the political spectrum as well as African-American feminists’ analyses of the stereotypes of Black women underlying those reactions. This analysis engages the debates from a different perspective. First, the chapter addresses the under-theorizing of the racialized gender norms embedded in the symbolism of the White House and the role of First Lady. It challenges the presumption of traditional notions of true womanhood and the incorrect conclusion that mothering would preclude public engagement.

Second and most importantly, this chapter argues that there are fundamental misunderstandings of what mothering meant for Michelle Obama as African-American woman. Cultural traditions and socio-historical conditions have led Black women, both relatives and non-kin, to form mothering relationships with others’ children and to appreciate the interdependence of “nurturing” one's own children, other children, and entire communities. Those practitioners whose nurturing activities encompassed commitment and contributions to the collectivity were referred to as community othermothering. Using primary sources, this chapter examines in detail Michelle Obama's socialization for and her practice of community othermothering in her role as First Lady. Attention is focused on her transformation of White House events by extending hospitality to more within Washington, DC, and the nation, plus broadening young people's exposure to inspiration, opportunities, and support for setting and accomplishing their dreams. Similarly, the concept of community othermothering is also used to explain Michelle Obama’s reinterpretation of the traditional First Lady's special project into the ambitious “Let's Move” initiative to end childhood obesity within a generation. The othermothering values and endeavors have helped establish the White House as “the People's House.”

Details

Race in the Age of Obama
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-167-2

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Martin Morgan Tuuli, Steve Rowlinson, Richard Fellows and Anita M.M. Liu

This paper aims to examine the impact of leadership style and team context on structural and psychological empowerment perceptions in project teams.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of leadership style and team context on structural and psychological empowerment perceptions in project teams.

Design/methodology/approach

It was posited that span of control and within team interdependence will positively and significantly influence both structural and psychological empowerment. Person‐orientated leadership style was also expected to positively impact both structural and psychological empowerment while task orientated leadership style was expected to have a negative impact. These hypothesized relationships were examined using ordinary least squares (OLS) regression and hierarchical linear modelling (HLM) with data obtained through a parallel quantitative questionnaire survey of construction client, consultant and contractor organizations in Hong Kong.

Findings

No significant relationship was found between span of control and any facet of empowerment while team interdependence had a positive and significant relationship with psychological empowerment but not structural empowerment. Task‐orientated leadership was positively and significantly related to psychological empowerment in the full sample and contractor teams but not in consultant and client teams. Person‐orientated leadership was positively and significantly related to psychological empowerment in the full sample, consultant and client teams but not in contractor teams.

Originality/value

The link between leadership style, team context and three facets of empowerment are examined compared with previous studies often focusing on one facet. Sub‐sample analysis enabled more subtle differences of the impact of leadership style in different context to be revealed, an indication that samples may not be homogeneous.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Marcy Rita, Otto Randa Payangan, Yohanes Rante, Ruben Tuhumena and Anita Erari

This study aims to examine the relationship between transformational leadership, organizational commitment, motivation, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between transformational leadership, organizational commitment, motivation, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and employee performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is located in the province of Papua, and more specifically at the District Secretariat Papua Province. The study was conducted in the months from April to June 2016. This study tested the effect of transformational leadership, organizational commitment, work motivation, OCB and performance Officer Regional Secretariat Papua Province, then the variable research is transformational leadership, organizational commitment, work motivation, OCB and performance officer. Structural equation modeling (SEM) calculation tool is commonly used is the program analysis of moment structures.

Findings

The results of studies show that moderating OCB does not significantly affect the relationship between organizational commitment, transformational leadership, work motivation and the performance of employees at the District Secretariat in Papua Province.

Originality/value

Originality of this paper is on the comprehensive study that combines the variables of transformational leadership, organizational commitment, work motivation, OCB and performance into a complete model of study. Originality for this paper shows the moderation effect of OCB on the effect of organizational commitment, transformational leadership and work motivation on employee performance. This research is located in the Province of Papua, and more specifically at the District Secretariat Papua Province.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 60 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Paul Gibson and Silvia Seibold

The purpose of this paper is to explain how the role of marketing for luxury brands can be re-thought in order to ensure that such brands establish a strong connection…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how the role of marketing for luxury brands can be re-thought in order to ensure that such brands establish a strong connection between their luxury image and positive social and environmental values.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings are based upon qualitative empirical research which informed a new categorisation of consumer motivations, through the application of self-determination theory which shows how concerns for environmental and social sustainability can be integrated with individual psychological needs.

Findings

The findings provide a deep understanding of consumers of luxury-eco products which could be used by marketing practitioners to shape socially responsible purchasing decisions.

Research limitations/implications

The research was designed for theory building, not theory-testing, so future research would be needed to study the efficacy of the recommended strategies for encouraging eco-luxury behaviour.

Practical implications

To increase the likelihood of practical applications, the authors follow the presentation of their findings with suggestions and examples for marketing to each of the consumer types identified by their research.

Social implications

The findings of this research have implications of a global, environmental and social kind. The societal adoption of eco-luxury consumption is about educating consumer desire, shifting it from its current focus on personal satisfaction, to a higher level of personal and social flourishing.

Originality/value

The findings effectively support the claims of self-determination theory by demonstrating how and why consumer motivations differ and how an improved sense of well-being can be achieved through internalised levels of self-determination.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 41 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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