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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Anis Chowdhury

Examines the financial sector reform experience of Bangladesh. Finds that, while there have been some improvements in competition and efficiency, loan defaults still remain a…

2087

Abstract

Examines the financial sector reform experience of Bangladesh. Finds that, while there have been some improvements in competition and efficiency, loan defaults still remain a significant problem. Also finds urban bias in loan allocation and shift of resources away from the rural sector. The main obstruction in the area of loan recovery is political interference. Provides a principal‐agent explanation of politicians’ behavior. Concludes that effective implementation of an optimal policy mix depends on complex political and institutional factors. Agues that without moral norms donor agency‐engineered formal institutional reforms become meaningless. Emphasizes the role of civil society organizations in creating and maintaining ethical social behavior, when state agents themselves are involved in fraudulent activities. In the absence of generalized morality and in a society where transactions are still guided predominantly by relationships, perhaps market‐oriented policy reform may increase transactions cost.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 29 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Girijasankar Mallik and Anis Chowdhury

This paper examines the relationship between inflation and real income in Australia, Canada, Finland, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden and the UK which have adopted a “formal” policy of…

4880

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between inflation and real income in Australia, Canada, Finland, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden and the UK which have adopted a “formal” policy of low or zero inflation target. Using cointegration analysis and a vector error correction model (VECM)), we find that the long‐run relationship between inflation and real income is positive in most cases. We further find that contrary to the belief of new‐classical economics, government expenditure too is positively related to real income in the long‐run.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Girijasankar Mallik and Anis Chowdhury

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relationship between inflation, inflation uncertainty, growth and growth uncertainty for Australia.

4132

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relationship between inflation, inflation uncertainty, growth and growth uncertainty for Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

Multivariate EGARCH models has been used to estimate the relationship between inflation, inflation uncertainty, growth and growth uncertainty for Australia.

Findings

Using quarterly data in multivariate EGARCH models, this study finds that both inflation uncertainty and output uncertainty have negative and significant effects on output growth. The paper also finds that, while inflation uncertainty has a positive and significant effect on inflation, output uncertainty has a negative and significant effect on inflation. The study uses a newly constructed oil price dummy as a control variable and finds that oil price changes significantly increase inflation uncertainty. The study also finds that inflation uncertainty and the inflation level have both declined since the adoption of a formal inflation‐targeting monetary policy in Australia.

Research limitations/implications

Multivariate EGARCH model can be used to estimate the effects of inflation, inflation uncertainty, growth and growth uncertainty for cross‐country analysis.

Originality/value

This is the first study of the effect of inflation uncertainty and growth uncertainty on inflation and growth in Australia using a newly constructed oil price dummy in a multivariate EGARCH framework.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Anis Chowdhury

The article attempts to locate the lack of macroeconomic stability and hence the problem of low economic growth in developing economies in the absence of appropriate institutions…

1799

Abstract

The article attempts to locate the lack of macroeconomic stability and hence the problem of low economic growth in developing economies in the absence of appropriate institutions. Paradoxically, government can fail in both authoritarian and democratic systems and accentuate market failures which government interventions are supposed to rectify in the first place if the state is weak. The challenge is to design institutions that are compatible with democracy. Institutional change should start from legal reform. There must also be an élite bureaucracy based on competitive selection criteria. In the presence of an inefficient political cycle, the central bank should be made independent from the executive branch of the government to be supplemented by fiscal reforms designed to increase transparency and to safeguard against political interference. The importance of financial deregulation and trade liberalisation lies in the fact that a well developed financial sector acts as an internal constraint while the openness of an economy acts as an external constraint on the macroeconomic misbehaviour of politicians.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 1/2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Anis Chowdhury and Iyanatul Islam

The purpose of this paper is to shed some light on the role of macroeconomic policy‐mix in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), especially the goal of poverty…

2009

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed some light on the role of macroeconomic policy‐mix in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), especially the goal of poverty reduction.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs descriptive approach and provides an analytical narrative of historical experience.

Findings

It is argued that macroeconomic policy‐mixes pursued by many developing countries as part of conditions to receive support from international financial institutions and the donor community have been largely restrictive. They have failed, in most cases, to generate high enough growth to have significant impacts on poverty reduction. The poverty reducing impact of growth has also been weakened by the rise in inequality due to associated policy reforms promoting market liberalization and deregulation.

Practical implications

The paper argues in favor of using full and productive employment, which is one of the core MDGs, as the goal of macroeconomic policies.

Originality/value

The paper argues that there should be refocusing of macroeconomic policies to align with MDGs.

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Anis Chowdhury, Iyanatul Islam and Donald Lee

The purpose of the paper is to review the social consequences of the Great Recession of 2008‐2009. In particular, it looks at impacts on the world of work – unemployment, informal…

4306

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to review the social consequences of the Great Recession of 2008‐2009. In particular, it looks at impacts on the world of work – unemployment, informal and vulnerable employment, working poor and youth unemployment, and on public health – hunger and malnutrition, suicides, domestic violence and child abuse. In all fronts, the Great Recession had serious adverse impacts and morphed into a global social crisis. The situation is made worse due to obsessions with fiscal consolidation in the midst of tepid and uncertain recovery. The paper argues that policies matter and advocates for strengthening social protection and continued stimulus in order to ensure robust recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a general review and it draws on the findings of the United Nations flagship publication, Report of the World Social Situation 2011. It is an analytical narrative of impacts of on‐going economic crisis.

Findings

The paper finds a worsening employment situation – rise in unemployment, informal and vulnerable employment, youth unemployment, and working poverty. It also finds adverse public health impacts in terms of rise in malnutrition and hunger, suicide rates, domestic violence and child abuse. Finally the paper finds that policies matters in mitigating worst impacts as well as sustaining recovery.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are tentative as the social impacts of economic crisis become obvious after a long time lag.

Originality/value

The paper argues that policies matter and advocates for strengthening social protection and continued stimulus in order to ensure robust recovery.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Muin‐ud‐din Ahmad Khan

Significance of Knowledge The functional name of the Holy Quran is ‘huda’, the guiding light. It focuses divine light on each and every object separating thereby the right from…

1434

Abstract

Significance of Knowledge The functional name of the Holy Quran is ‘huda’, the guiding light. It focuses divine light on each and every object separating thereby the right from the wrong' (al‐furqan). As this is accomplished by dint of knowledge (al‐ 'ilm). All these three guiding elements namely huda, furqan and ilm, are lined‐up by Allah, the Lord Providence (Rabb‐ulalamin), for earthly welfare (hasanah) and other‐worldly salvation (falah) of human beings. In Quranic context, knowledge, therefore, carries a great significance.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Anis Daghar, Leila Alinaghian and Neil Turner

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review, synthesize and critically evaluate the current research status on the role of collaborative interorganizational…

2622

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review, synthesize and critically evaluate the current research status on the role of collaborative interorganizational relationships (CIRs) in supply chain risks (SCRs) from a social capital perspective and provide an organizing lens for future scholarship in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a systematic literature review approach to investigate 126 articles from 27 peer-reviewed journals between 1995 and 2020.

Findings

This paper investigates supply chain CIRs using a social capital perspective to explain the role of structural, relational and cognitive capital that resides in these relationships in various SCRs (i.e. environmental, supply, manufacturing, demand, information, financial and transportation). The review reveals that the three social capital dimensions uniquely and both positively and negatively affect different SCRs. The findings further suggest that the perceived SCRs can influence the structural and relational capital.

Practical implications

This study calls for practitioners to consider the cognitive alignment with their supply network partners, their relational investments, as well as the interorganizational processes and systems in managing and alleviating SCRs.

Originality/value

This review offers a theoretical articulation of how various aspects of CIRs affect SCRs. Specifically, this study extends the existing understanding of the role of social capital in SCRs through offering a synthesis of dominant findings and discourses, and avenues for future research.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2022

Anis Daghar, Leila Alinaghian and Neil Turner

Research on the “black box” of cognitive capital remains limited in supply chain resilience (SCRES) literature. Drawing from an in-depth single case study of a major consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on the “black box” of cognitive capital remains limited in supply chain resilience (SCRES) literature. Drawing from an in-depth single case study of a major consumer electronics multinational facing the COVID-19 disruption, this paper aims to develop a clearer picture of cognitive capital’s elements while contextualizing how they interact with SCRES temporal capabilities to prepare, respond, recover and learn.

Design/methodology/approach

Consisting of 40 in-depth interviews collected during a four-month period, this single case revolves around the buyer’s view across 36 multiregional buyer–supplier dyads, spanning 17 product and service categories. Data were processed during the pandemic, while findings discuss pre- and intra-crisis events based on two scenarios: the impact of disruption on category demand, comparing sudden pandemic-driven product and service demand fluctuations (i.e. increase, decrease); and the geographical proximity of the supplier relative to the buying firm.

Findings

The case unveils different elements of cognitive capital (e.g. shared goals, assumptions, values, kinesics language, multilingualism, virtual negotiation, prior disruption experience, shared process capabilities) during a major global disruption, suggesting that different cognitive capital elements influence positively and differently SCRES’ temporal capabilities. Overall, buying firms are urged to build on cognitive capital to improve SCRES preparation, response, recovery and learning.

Originality/value

This paper extends the understanding of cognitive capital in buyer–supplier relationships by identifying its elements and offering a theoretical articulation of how they enable episodically the four SCRES temporal capabilities under contingencies of increased and decreased demands, and suppliers’ geographical proximity.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 February 2024

Sabrine Cherni and Anis Ben Amar

This study aims to examine how digitalization affects the work efficiency of the Shariah Supervisory Board (SSB) in Islamic banks.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how digitalization affects the work efficiency of the Shariah Supervisory Board (SSB) in Islamic banks.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses panel data analysis of annual report disclosures over the past 10 years. The authors have selected 79 Islamic banks for the period ranging from 2012 to 2021. The criteria for SSB efficiency used in this research are disclosure of Zakat and disclosure in the SSB report.

Findings

The econometric results show that digitalization has a positive effect on improving the work efficiency of the SSB in Islamic banks. Accordingly, the authors provide evidence that the higher the bank's digital engagement, the higher the quality of the SSB.

Originality/value

The findings highlight the need to improve the current understanding of SSB structures and governance mechanisms that can better assist Islamic banks in engaging in effective compliance with recent governance and accounting reforms. Moreover, Islamic banks are the most capable and appropriate to implement and activate digitalization because they are based on a vital root calling for development if there are executives believing in it, as well as legislation supporting and serving them.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

1 – 10 of 31