Search results

1 – 10 of 29
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Joel R. Evans and Anil Mathur

The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed and critical look at the evolution of online survey research since Evans and Mathur’s (2005) article on the value of…

Downloads
6048

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed and critical look at the evolution of online survey research since Evans and Mathur’s (2005) article on the value of online surveys. At that time, online survey research was in its early stages. Also covered are the present and future states of online research. Many conclusions and recommendations are presented.

Design/methodology/approach

The look back focuses on online surveys, strengths and weaknesses of online surveys, the literature on several aspects of online surveys and online survey best practices. The look ahead focuses on emerging survey technologies and methodologies, and new non-survey technologies and methodologies. Conclusions and recommendations are provided.

Findings

Online survey research is used more frequently and better accepted by researchers than in 2005. Yet, survey techniques are still regularly transformed by new technologies. Non-survey digital research is also more prominent than in 2005 and can better track actual behavior than surveys can. Hybrid surveys will be widespread in the future.

Practical implications

The paper aims to provide insights for researchers with different levels of online survey experience. And both academics and practitioners should gain insights.

Social implications

Adhering to a strong ethics code is vital to gain respondents’ trust and to produce valid results.

Originality/value

Conclusions and recommendations are offered in these specific areas: defining concepts, understanding the future role of surveys, developing and implementing surveys and a survey code of ethics. The literature review cites more than 200 sources.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Thuckavadee Sthienrapapayut, George P. Moschis and Anil Mathur

The purpose of this study is to test the efficiency of the “gerontographics” model in predicting selected consumer behaviours in older adults.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to test the efficiency of the “gerontographics” model in predicting selected consumer behaviours in older adults.

Design/methodology/approach

Through regression analysis, a large sample of older Thai adults is used to test the predictive power of gerontographics against predictive measures based on both chronological age and cognitive age.

Findings

The findings of the study show that the gerontographics model is more powerful in predicting certain types of older adults’ consumer behaviour than chronological age or cognitive age.

Originality/value

These findings have implications for marketing and business strategies because they suggest that gerontographics segmentation may be a more useful and effective way to segment older consumers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Benny Barak, Anil Mathur, Yong Zhang, Keun Lee and Emmanuel Erondu

Field survey studies undertaken in Nigeria, Korea, China and India explored the way inner‐age satisfaction is experienced in those culturally diverse societies…

Abstract

Field survey studies undertaken in Nigeria, Korea, China and India explored the way inner‐age satisfaction is experienced in those culturally diverse societies. Chronologically 20 to 59 year old respondents’ inner‐age satisfaction was gauged as the average difference between feel, look, do, and interest cognitive (self‐perceived) and desired (ideal) inner‐age dimensions. Analyses of covariance (with chronological age factored out) across the four nations showed Nigeria to differ significantly in terms of inner‐age satisfaction from each Asian population, contrary to the Asian societies where no differences were found across samples (except between Korea and India where inner‐age satisfaction differed at a p .05). High levels of satisfaction with inner‐age (coming about when cognitive and desired ages are equal) commonly transpired: 31.4 per cent of Indian, 36.9 per cent of Nigerian, 44.3 per cent of Chinese, and 44.9 per cent of Korean respondents. Age dissatisfaction in an elder direction (ideal age older than self‐perceived age) was atypical and happened most often among Nigerian (23.4 per cent) and least among Korean subjects (10.7 per cent). In contrast, wishing for a younger innerage was a commonplace phenomenon in India (50.6 per cent of the sample), as well as in China where it occurred the least (36.6 per cent). The study’s findings imply the universal nature of the way human beings (irrespective of culture) perceive and feel about inner‐age, as well as the potential of an inner‐age satisfaction psychographic as a relevant consumer behavior segmentation trait for marketing planners of age‐sensitive products and services who seek to standardize their global branding and distribution.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 15 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2013

George P. Moschis, Fon Sim Ong, Masoud Abessi, Takako Yamashita and Anil Mathur

The purpose of this paper is to focus on testing hypotheses derived from theories presented by leading scholars regarding possible sources of differences in reliability…

Downloads
1584

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on testing hypotheses derived from theories presented by leading scholars regarding possible sources of differences in reliability coefficients, using cross-sectional data from Japan and Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted in Malaysia and Japan, both of them characterized as having collectivist values. Convenience sampling and the same method of survey administration, personal interviews by trained interviewers, was used in both countries.

Findings

The tests of the hypotheses regarding cultural, subcultural, and aging effects provide some results in line with the hypotheses, but they raise additional concerns about the possible sources of measurement differences and the applicability of theories and measures developed in one country to other countries and subcultures within countries. The major findings include the alpha reliability coefficient of the self-esteem scale (SSE) which is hypothesised to be lower than the alpha for the material value scale (MVS) and satisfaction with life scale (SWLS) in the Malaysian and Japanese samples, but this difference only occurs for the Japanese sample.

Research limitations/implications

The study findings highlight the challenges that researchers confront when conducting cross-cultural studies.

Originality/value

The present study systematically tests the reliability of measures developed in the West and employed in different countries (especially Asian countries). Although several assumptions and speculations have been made regarding the sources of potential bias in measures used when studying cultural and subcultural differences, little empirical work supports these views. Our study fills this gap.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Anil Mathur, Benny Barak, Yong Zhang, Keun S. Lee, Boonghee Yoo and Jeeyeon Ha

– The purpose of this paper is to develop a scale to measure social religiosity (SR) and assess its measurement invariance across different cultures.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a scale to measure social religiosity (SR) and assess its measurement invariance across different cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

The research relied on samples from China (n=486), India (n=377), Japan (n=362), Korea (n=386), and the USA (n=580). The invariance process involved carrying out a series of confirmatory factor analyses with progressively more restrictive constraints.

Findings

Results show the SR scale to be reliable and valid across culturally and religiously diverse countries. Implications of the findings are also discussed.

Originality/value

Based on Katz (1988) this is a new scale to measure SR and its measurement invariance is assessed across culturally divergent countries.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Anil Mathur, Elaine Sherman and Leon G. Schiffman

Based on Schiffman and Sherman’s conceptual model of the new‐age elderly this article constructs a measure that identifies this segment of elderly in terms of their value…

Downloads
5112

Abstract

Based on Schiffman and Sherman’s conceptual model of the new‐age elderly this article constructs a measure that identifies this segment of elderly in terms of their value orientation. The findings show that older consumers’ value orientations are an effective segmentation approach; one that is superior for partitioning the market for services like leisure travel than the traditional age‐based segmentation approach. Marketing strategy implications of the findings are also discussed.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Anil Mathur and George P. Moschis

Although older American spend increasingly large sums of money on goodsand services, it is widely believed by financial service providers andretailers that these…

Downloads
1867

Abstract

Although older American spend increasingly large sums of money on goods and services, it is widely believed by financial service providers and retailers that these individuals make relatively little use of credit cards. Using a large national sample of respondents from different age groups, finds that older adults use credit cards as frequently as younger adults when circumstances and opportunities for consumption in both groups are similar. Age‐related declines in use of credit cards may reflect changes in lifestyles and other circumstances associated with age, not age per se. Discusses implications of the results for retailers and consumer credit lenders.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

George P. Moschis, Euehun Lee and Anil Mathur

Points out that the aging population has captured the attention of marketers, but that many companies are still uncertain as to whether they should, or how they should, go…

Downloads
24899

Abstract

Points out that the aging population has captured the attention of marketers, but that many companies are still uncertain as to whether they should, or how they should, go about marketing to the mature market. Highlights some of the key issues marketers are confronted with and discusses reasons for implementation of certain strategies. Concludes that, for marketing strategies to be effective, they should take into consideration the heterogeneity of the mature market and the specific product or service being marketed. Uses the results of recent studies to illustrate how such target product‐specific strategies can be developed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Anil Mathur and George P. Moschis

States that although the concept of “stress” has received increased attention in the behavioral and social sciences throughout the past five decades, it has been virtually…

Downloads
2533

Abstract

States that although the concept of “stress” has received increased attention in the behavioral and social sciences throughout the past five decades, it has been virtually ignored by consumer researchers. Presents conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of stress research, which suggest that many changes in individuals’ consumption behaviors are efforts to cope with stressful life circumstances. A study was conducted to test specific hypotheses about the effects of stress on consumption‐coping strategies of older adults. Results suggest that when older consumers experience stressful life circumstances, they may initiate, intensify, or change consumption activities to handle stress. Specific coping strategies were found to differ by gender. Implications for future consumer research are discussed.

Details

Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 5 no. 6/7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Marylyn Carrigan and Isabelle Szmigin

Downloads
2665

Abstract

Details

Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 5 no. 6/7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

1 – 10 of 29