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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2019

Nikita Sharda and Anil Bhat

There has been substantial research on luxury globally, but there is a dearth of studies empirically investigating the key relationships affecting luxury consumption. The…

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Abstract

Purpose

There has been substantial research on luxury globally, but there is a dearth of studies empirically investigating the key relationships affecting luxury consumption. The aim of this paper is to consider the role of consumer vanity and brand consciousness and to set their relationships in context of luxury consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

To measure consumer vanity, brand consciousness, attitude towards luxury brands and purchase intentions, pre-established scale items were adopted. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed through luxury exhibitions and festivals in major cities of India. A sample of n = 342 luxury consumers was analysed using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings support that brand consciousness is mediating the relationship between consumer vanity and luxury consumption. Luxury consumers are primarily driven by achievement vanity. They are likely to evaluate luxury brands based on their price, fame and their ability to portray their professional achievements. They incur unreasonable costs to acquire the expensive, famous and prestigious luxury brands and conspicuously consume them to display their success and accomplishments.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides an in-depth explanation of how consumer vanity is leading to consumption of luxury brands. The marketers may benefit by focussing on promotion of their brand's symbols and logos than on specific product features.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical examination understanding the mediating effect of brand consciousness as a mediator between consumer vanity and luxury consumption.

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Preeti Tiwari, Anil K. Bhat, Jyoti Tikoria and Kaustav Saha

The purpose of this paper is to identify the entrepreneurial intention (EI) among nascent entrepreneurs in the Indian context by using Shapero’s theory of entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the entrepreneurial intention (EI) among nascent entrepreneurs in the Indian context by using Shapero’s theory of entrepreneurial event as the research framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A 34-item questionnaire was responded to 250 nascent entrepreneurs who are engaged in executing the new business idea or creating new ventures and enroled in the universities in India. The questions measured perceived desirability, perceived feasibility, entrepreneurial educational background, entrepreneurial self-efficacy, perceived social pressure and previous work experience in entrepreneurial activities towards entrepreneurship intention. The data were collected by employing a systematic random sampling method. The sample represents 174 male and 76 female nascent entrepreneurs belonging to various disciplines. Structural equation modelling has been used for data analysis.

Findings

The results show that the proposed model in the present study explains 51 per cent of the variance, explaining the entrepreneurship intention. Entrepreneurial self-efficacy was found to be the strongest predictor of EI (β=0.397 at p<0.001) followed by previous experience in entrepreneurial activities (β=0.285 at p<0.001).

Research limitations/implications

More than limitation this research study adds to the existing literature of the EI by using a different set of the sample. Mostly EI studies used student sample to measure intentions. Kolvereid and Isaksen used a sample of entrepreneurs to measure EI and achieved very different results. Therefore, this research study extends the work of Kolvereid and Isaksen by using a sample of nascent social entrepreneurs.

Practical implications

The finding of this research study will facilitate policy makers and educators to promote entrepreneurial activities at the university level. Based on the results and findings of the study, the educators may improve upon the support system to help and motivate students to opt for social entrepreneurship as their career choice.

Originality/value

Ajzen (1988) emphasised that the relative significance of the antecedents of intention will vary depending on which stage of intention is under scrutiny. This is one of its kinds of research study that used a sample of nascent entrepreneurs in the Indian context. Findings of this research will be helpful in predicting how the intention process of nascent entrepreneurs works especially in developing countries.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Jayashree Mahesh and Anil K. Bhat

The purpose of this paper is to document similarities and differences between management practices of different types of organizations in India’s IT sector through an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document similarities and differences between management practices of different types of organizations in India’s IT sector through an empirical survey. The authors expected these differences to be significant enough for us to be able to group a priori this set of companies meaningfully through cluster analysis on the basis of the similarity of their management practices alone.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed-methods approach, 73 senior-level executives of companies working in India’s IT sector were approached with a pretested questionnaire to find out differences on eighteen management practices in the areas of operations management, monitoring management, targets management and talent management. The different types of organizations surveyed were small and amp; medium global multinationals, large global multinationals, small and medium Indian multinationals, large Indian multinationals and small and medium local Indian companies. The differences and similarities found through statistical testing were further validated a priori through cluster analysis and qualitative interviews with senior-level executives.

Findings

The management practices of multinationals in India are moving toward Western management practices, indicating that management practices converge as the organizations grow in size. Though the practices of large Indian multinationals were not significantly different from those of global multinationals, the surprising finding was that large Indian multinationals scored better than global multinationals on a few practices. The practices of small and medium Indian companies differed significantly from those of other types of organizations and hence they formed a cluster.

Practical implications

The finding that large Indian IT multinationals have an edge over global multinationals in certain people management practices is a confirmation of the role of human resource practices in their current success and their continuing competitive advantage.

Originality/value

This is perhaps the first study of its kind to document state of specific management practices across different types of organizations in India’s IT sector and then use measures on these practices to group a priori these organizations for validation.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Preeti Tiwari, Anil K. Bhat and Jyoti Tikoria

The purpose of this paper is to identify the role of cognitive styles (CgStys) and self-efficacy (SEff) in the formation of social entrepreneurial intentions (SEIs) among…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the role of cognitive styles (CgStys) and self-efficacy (SEff) in the formation of social entrepreneurial intentions (SEIs) among the students of a premier multi-campus technical university in India using the theory of planned behaviour as the research framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A 54-item questionnaire was responded by 550 students. The data were collected by employing a systematic random sampling method. In the total sample of the respondents, 67 per cent (n=368) were male and 33 per cent (n=182) were female and the average age of the respondents was 20 years. Structural equation modelling has been used for data analysis.

Findings

The results of the study support that the relationship between antecedents (CgStys and SEff) and SEIs was mediated by the attitude towards becoming a social entrepreneur, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control. Findings of this research study also suggest that students with high level of SEff are more inclined towards social entrepreneurial activities.

Research limitations/implications

The study was confined to the students from a technical university, and it may not give the generalized findings for students from the non-technical stream.

Practical implications

The finding of this research study will facilitate policy makers and educators for promoting social entrepreneurial activities at the university level. Based on the results and findings of the study, the educators may improve upon the support system to help and motivate students to opt social entrepreneurship as their career choice.

Originality/value

This is one of its kinds of research conducted in the Indian context. Findings of this research will be helpful in predicting how the intention process of Indian students is affected by their CgStys and SEff.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 26 November 2014

Nirankush Dutta and Anil K. Bhat

Principles of management, Marketing, Finance, Strategy, Supply Chain Management, Entrepreneurship.

Abstract

Subject area

Principles of management, Marketing, Finance, Strategy, Supply Chain Management, Entrepreneurship.

Study level/applicability

Master's Degree level courses, after students have been taught most of the basics related to management, marketing, finance, strategy, supply chain management and entrepreneurship.

Case overview

Founded in 2007 with an initial investment of less than USA $10,000, Flipkart has come a long way to become the largest E-commerce player in India with a registered user base of 9.6 million and valued at USA $1.6 billion. Efficient use of various marketing strategies has catapulted the company to its success. Till now, they have overcome most of the hurdles successfully. However, a lot needs to be discussed to find out ways to meet the challenges thrown by its competitors, to maintain its supremacy over other online e-retailers and continue its exponential growth to meet USA $1 billion sales by 2015.

Expected learning outcomes

After discussion of the case study, the student should be able to appreciate general business processes and develop basic analytical skills to resolve challenges faced by a fast-growing online start-up company in an emerging country like India. At the end, the students should be able to prepare a marketing plan for their own business within a stipulated budget.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 4 no. 7
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

– This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Efficient use of various marketing strategies has catapulted the Indian online commerce company Flipkart to its success. They have successfully overcome most of the hurdles put in their way. However, much needs to be discussed to find out ways to meet the challenges thrown by its competitors to maintain its supremacy over other online e-retailers and continue its exponential growth to meet US $1 billion sales by 2015.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2020

Shreeranga Bhat, E.V. Gijo, Anil Melwyn Rego and Vinayambika S. Bhat

The aim of the article is to ascertain the challenges, lessons learned and managerial implications in the deployment of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) competitiveness to micro…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the article is to ascertain the challenges, lessons learned and managerial implications in the deployment of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) competitiveness to micro, small and medium Enterprises (MSME) in India and to establish doctrines to strengthen the initiatives of the government.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts the Action Research methodology to develop a case study, which is carried out in the printing industry in a Tier III city using the LSS DMAIC (Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control) approach. It utilizes LSS tools to deploy the strategy and to unearth the challenges and success factors in improving the printing process of a specific batch of a product.

Findings

The root cause for the critical to quality (CTQ) characteristic, turn-around-time (TAT) is determined and the solutions are deployed through the scientifically proven data-based approach. As a result of this study, the TAT reduced from an average of 1541.2–1303.36 min, which in turn, improved the sigma level from 0.55 to 2.96, a noteworthy triumph for this MSME. The company realizes an annual savings of USD 12,000 per year due to the success of this project. Top Management Leadership, Data-Based Validation, Technical Know-how and Industrial Engineering Knowledge Base are identified as critical success factors (CSFs), while profitability and on-time delivery are the key performance indicators (KPIs) for the MSME. Eventually, the lessons learned and implications indicate that LSS competitiveness can be treated as quality management standards (QMS) and quality tools and techniques (QTT) to ensure competitive advantage, sustainable green practices and growth.

Research limitations/implications

Even though the findings and recommendations of this research are based on a single case study, it is worth noting that the case study is executed in a Tier III city along with novice users of LSS tools and techniques. This indicates the applicability of LSS in MSME and thus, the modality adopted can be further refined to suit the socio-cultural aspects of India.

Originality/value

This article illustrates the deployment of LSS from the perspective of novice users, to assist MSME and policymakers to reinforce competitiveness through LSS. Moreover, the government can initiate a scheme in line with LSS competitiveness to complement the existing schemes based on the findings of the case study.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Imlak Shaikh, Satyendra Kr. Sharma and Anil Kumar Bhat

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Article
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Nikita Sharda and Anil Kumar Bhat

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of materialism and brand consciousness in determining the luxury consumption among the young Indian consumers.

1984

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of materialism and brand consciousness in determining the luxury consumption among the young Indian consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to measure materialism, brand consciousness, attitude toward luxury brands and purchase intention, pre-established scale items were used to design the self-administered questionnaire. A valid sample of 342 respondents was collected through mall intercepts, in-store intercepts, luxury brands exhibitions and festivals and international airports. The relationship was tested using regression analysis.

Findings

The findings support that the materialism and brand consciousness are positively related to the luxury consumption in India and play an important role in predicting the behavior of the young luxury buyers. The Indian youth is buying expensive luxury brands as symbols of status success and wealth in order to fulfill their materialistic goals. The desire to own and possess the well-known and expensive brand names demonstrates the importance the consumers attach to the social and symbolic value of the luxury brands.

Practical implications

The study reveals that the young Indian luxury buyers choose to buy brands that are most advertised. Creative advertisements enhancing luxury brands’ symbolic and social value can be effective. The study has implications for the international luxury brands, as they are expensive, well known and famous among the global consumers.

Originality/value

The key contribution of the study is the establishment of materialism and brand consciousness as important antecedents in the development of attitude toward luxury brands among the young Indian consumers.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 7 October 2021

K. S. Manikandan

Corporate Strategy; Strategy.

Abstract

Subject area

Corporate Strategy; Strategy.

Study level/applicability

Post-graduate; Executive education; Under-graduate.

Case overview

The case is based on Titan Company Limited (Titan), one of India’s profitable diversified companies. Set in April 2020, the case presents the evolution of Titan’s growth strategy in the last three decades. The company had grown by continuously exploring adjacent categories in the personal lifestyle space. The case asks whether the strategy that has guided Titan for the past three decades would continue to provide growth. What changes, if any, should be made by C.K. Venkataraman—the new CEO who had taken charge a few months back in October 2019—and his team?

The case describes Titan’s evolution from 1987 to 2020. ‘Winning times’, the first section of the case, describes Titan’s early choices in the watches business that helped the company achieve market dominance and its successive choices to expand the scope of watches businesses by entering new adjacencies. The section also details the evolution of Titan’s design, manufacturing, marketing and retailing capabilities in early years. ‘Looking for another gem’ describes Titan’s venture into the jewellery business – the failure of its early attempts to export and its pivot to domestic market and the successful turnaround of the business. ‘On the fast track to growth’ deals with Titan’s accessories business. The section ‘Eyeing new businesses’ describes Titan’s foray into prescription eyewear and precision engineering businesses and the company’s performance in these businesses. ‘A new identity’ details Titan’s adoption of a distinct corporate identity in 2013. ‘New businesses’ provides information on Titan’s recent foray into fragrances and sarees business. The case ends with the section ‘Years ahead’ which asks what changes, if any, should be made by the leadership team.

Expected learning outcomes:

Upon completion of the case study discussion, participants will be able to: understand the concept of the ‘core competence’ and the three tests of core competence; how core competencies evolve in an organization over time; diversification (growth) strategy based on core competencies and adjacencies; and key managerial choices and organizational processes required to ensure effectiveness of diversification strategy based on core competencies.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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