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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Sooksan Kantabutra and Gayle Avery

Avery and Bergsteiner's updated set of 23 sustainable leadership practices derived from sustainable enterprises and five performance outcomes provides a framework to…

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1736

Abstract

Purpose

Avery and Bergsteiner's updated set of 23 sustainable leadership practices derived from sustainable enterprises and five performance outcomes provides a framework to examine the business practices of Thailand's largest conglomerate, Siam Cement Group (SCG). The aim of this paper is to build on and expand Kantabutra and Avery's study based on Avery.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis was conducted by grouping Avery and Bergsteiner's principles into six categories, namely taking a long‐term perspective, investing in people, adapting the organizational culture, being innovative, exhibiting social and environmental responsibility, and behaving ethically. Adopting a multi‐data collection approach, research teams supplemented case study data with non‐participant observations from visits to the conglomerate and its training sessions. Multiple stakeholders were interviewed in semi‐structured interviews. Documentation and information supplied by, or published about, the conglomerate was consulted.

Findings

All six sets of practices, which sharply contrast with the prevailing business model of short‐term maximization of profitability but are consistent with the 23 sustainable leadership practices, were found to apply in varying degrees to SCG. A total of 19 applied strongly, with three others moderately strong.

Practical implications

Given that sustainable leadership principles are associated with enhanced brand and reputation, customer and staff satisfaction, and financial performance, the new Sustainable Leadership Grid provides corporate leaders with a useful checklist for this purpose.

Originality/value

This paper reports on the first examination of Avery and Bergsteiner's 23 sustainable leadership elements in a developing economy. It shows that even a publicly‐listed company can resist pressures to conform to business‐as‐usual practices and adopt the long‐term, socially responsible principles of “honeybee” sustainable leadership.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Sooksan Kantabutra and Molraudee Saratun

The aim of this paper is to adopt Avery and Bergsteiner's 23 sustainable leadership practices derived from sustainable organizations as a framework to examine the…

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1704

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to adopt Avery and Bergsteiner's 23 sustainable leadership practices derived from sustainable organizations as a framework to examine the leadership practices of Thailand's oldest university.

Design/methodology/approach

Avery and Bergsteiner's principles were grouped into six categories for analysis: long‐term perspective, staff development, organizational culture, innovation, social responsibility, and ethical behavior, providing the framework for analysis of the university. Adopting a multi‐data collection approach, research teams supplemented case study data with participant observations, and reference to documentation and information supplied by, or published about the university. Semi‐structured interviews were held with multiple stakeholders.

Findings

Six core sets of practices consistent with 21 sustainable leadership practices are identified: a focus on a long‐term perspective, staff development, a strong organizational culture, innovation, social and environmental responsibility and ethical behavior.

Practical implications

Since sustainable leadership principles link to enhanced brand and reputation, customer and staff satisfaction, and financial performance, the Sustainable Leadership Grid provides educational leaders with a useful checklist for this purpose.

Originality/value

This paper contains the first examination of sustainable leadership in the higher education sector. It shows that even a public service organization can adopt the long‐term, socially responsible principles of sustainable leadership.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2011

Sooksan Kantabutra

Rhineland leadership practices contrast sharply with the prevailing Anglo/US business model of short‐term maximization of profitability, and are said to lead to greater…

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5307

Abstract

Purpose

Rhineland leadership practices contrast sharply with the prevailing Anglo/US business model of short‐term maximization of profitability, and are said to lead to greater corporate sustainability, at least in highly developed economies. However, the applicability of Rhineland leadership to less developed economies has not yet been demonstrated. This paper sets out to compare the business practices of a social enterprise that delivers healthcare services in Thailand and Avery's 19 sustainable leadership practices derived from Rhineland enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a case study approach, multi‐data collection methods included non‐participant observations made during visits to the enterprise, and reference to internal and published documentation and information. Semi‐structured interview sessions were held with many stakeholders, including top management, staff, patients and a former consultant.

Findings

In the Thai healthcare organization studied, evidence was found for compliance with 15 of Avery's 19 sustainable leadership elements, but to varying degrees. The elements were grouped into six core sets of practices: adopting a long‐term perspective, staff development, organizational culture, innovation, social responsibility, and ethical behavior. One element was found to be not applicable, and no evidence was found for conformity with Rhineland principles on the remaining three sustainable practices. The paper concludes that Avery's 19 Rhineland practices provide a useful framework for evaluating the corporate sustainability of this Thai enterprise.

Practical implications

Healthcare enterprises in Thailand and possibly in other Asian countries that wish to sustain their organizational success could adopt Avery's 19 Sustainable Leadership Grid elements to examine their leadership practices, and adjust them to become more sustainable.

Originality/value

The relevance of Rhineland sustainable leadership principles to enterprises in less developed economies remains to be investigated. This study attempts to uncover this unknown.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Sooksan Kantabutra and Gayle C. Avery

This study examines the question of whether sustainable leadership principles, also known as Rhineland leadership, can apply to a listed business in an emerging economy.

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2781

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the question of whether sustainable leadership principles, also known as Rhineland leadership, can apply to a listed business in an emerging economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Avery's sustainable leadership grid provided the framework for analysis of a major publicly‐listed Thai enterprise, the Siam Cement Group (SCG). A multi‐method case study used semi‐structured interviews with various stakeholders, observations, and internal and external documentation. The Rhineland principles were grouped into six categories for analysis: long‐term perspective, investing in people, organizational culture, innovation, social and environmental responsibility, and behaving ethically.

Findings

Overall, data showed moderate to strong evidence for 18 of the 19 grid practices at SCG, the exception being the CEO serving as speaker of the top team rather than being a heroic leader. Moderate evidence was found for consensual and devolved decision making and self‐governing teams. All 16 other elements were strongly evident.

Research limitations/implications

Case studies cannot lead to generalizations, and therefore further research is required into other businesses to gauge the extent of Rhineland practices in Thailand and other developing economies.

Practical implications

Rhineland principles link to enhanced brand and reputation, customer and staff satisfaction, and financial performance compared with business‐as‐usual practices. Therefore, managers are advised to evaluate their current practices with a view to adopting more sustainable versions. The sustainable leadership grid provides a useful checklist for this purpose.

Social implications

Society and the planet stand to benefit under Rhineland practices. Increasingly, business is expected to help address many of the pressing problems facing humankind, such as climate change, pollution, unethical practices, and shortages of fossil fuels, water, and other resources. Rhineland leadership can contribute here because of its concern for the wider effects of its activities on society and the environment.

Originality/value

This paper is highly original. It contains the first examination of Rhineland leadership in a developing economy. In addition, it shows that even a public company can resist pressures to conform to business‐as‐usual practices and adopt the long‐term, socially responsible principles of Rhineland leadership.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Gayle C. Avery and Harald Bergsteiner

The purpose of this paper is to present an alternative leadership model to the prevailing shareholder‐first approach that research, management experts and practice

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14087

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an alternative leadership model to the prevailing shareholder‐first approach that research, management experts and practice indicate can lead to higher performance and resilience of a firm.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper is based on published literature, empirical research, and observations conducted in firms worldwide.

Findings

Avery and Bergsteiner's 23 principles differentiate sustainable or “honeybee” practices from shareholder‐first or “locust” leadership. Sustainable practices are arranged in a pyramid with three levels of practices and five performance outcomes at the apex. A total of 14 foundation practices can be introduced immediately. At the next level in the pyramid, six higher‐level practices emerge once the foundations are in place. Finally, three practices cover the key performance drivers of innovation, quality, and staff engagement – all of which end customers' experience. Together the 23 practices influence five outcomes, namely brand and reputation, customer satisfaction, operational finances, long‐term shareholder value, and long‐term value for multiple stakeholders.

Practical implications

Given that research and practice show that operating on sustainable principles enhances business performance and resilience, executives are urged to adopt these practices over business‐as‐usual. If self‐interest does not motivate this change, as it appears to have already done at Wal‐Mart, then major stakeholders or legislators can be expected to force such changes in the future.

Originality/value

This paper provides an answer to the question of whether there is there an alternative to the shareholder‐first leadership model. Its response is: yes, a demonstrably effective alternative already operates among many successful enterprises around the world.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Sooksan Kantabutra

This study aims to measure the Thai approach of corporate sustainability. In the corporate world, the Thai philosophy of Sufficiency Economy can be applied to ensure…

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1565

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to measure the Thai approach of corporate sustainability. In the corporate world, the Thai philosophy of Sufficiency Economy can be applied to ensure corporate sustainability. Derived from the literature, a structural model expressing relationships between six independent variables of Sufficiency Economy indicators and three dependent variables of sustainability performance outcomes is formed accordingly, followed by hypotheses to be tested.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is tested through a random sample of 294 chief executive officers (CEOs) in Thailand who were asked to respond to a questionnaire. Factor and regression analyses are adopted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Findings indicate that “perseverance” and “resilience” are two direct predictors of three sustainability outcomes of the firm’s enhanced capacity to deliver strong performance, endure social and economic crises and deliver public benefits. “Geosocial development” is a direct predictor of firm’s enhanced capacity to deliver public benefits and an indirect predictor of firm’s enhanced capacity to deliver strong performance and to endure social and economic crises. “Moderation” is an indirect predictor of the firm’s capacity to endure social and economic crises, while “sharing” is an indirect predictor of all three sustainability performance outcomes.

Practical implications

Small- and medium-sized enterprises business leaders should develop a “perseverance” culture in their organizations and practice “resilience” to enhance their corporate sustainability prospect. Moreover, they should adopt “geosocial development”, “moderation” and “sharing” practices in their organizations, as these practices positively affect corporate sustainability performance directly or indirectly.

Originality/value

This study is among the first few studies that identify corporate sustainability performance predictors.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

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384

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Richard Teare and Jim O’Hern

Uses a literature‐based review to frame the questions for tomorrow’s learning organization (the review is contained in section 2 of Teare et al., The Virtual University

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2650

Abstract

Uses a literature‐based review to frame the questions for tomorrow’s learning organization (the review is contained in section 2 of Teare et al., The Virtual University: An Action Paradigm and Process for Workplace Learning, Cassell, London, 1998, 351pp.) and some of the applications are related to the pioneering work conducted by the global lodging organization, Marriott International during 1998/1999, in partnership with International Management Centres. The contention is that the multi‐faceted challenges of service leadership, competitiveness, profitability and return on investment, require a highly responsive and supportive learning community. This delivers on the challenges and derives benefits in the form of rapid access and reduced cost, by utilizing a “virtual” network or university design. Depicts a sequence of “change factors”, “enablers” and “impacts” that provide a reference point framework for learning and for focusing on business outcomes. If these are the key deliverables, what kind of learning process is needed to ensure that managerial and organizational activity is properly aligned? It is proposed that work‐based “action learning” is the only sustainable means of building the intellectual capital and competence of the organization so as to achieve its service leadership and business goals.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Catherine Gorrell

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108

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Robert Houlton and Annette Thomas

In the mid‐1980s a group of leading British retail companiesjointly identified a mismatch between their graduate recruitmentrequirements and the motivation of graduate…

Abstract

In the mid‐1980s a group of leading British retail companies jointly identified a mismatch between their graduate recruitment requirements and the motivation of graduate applicants and entrants. Many graduate entrants had a personal goal of being appointed to a head office post and many were reluctant to make a long‐term commitment to retail operations management. The analysis of this problem is outlined by a joint‐company working party which recommended the formation of the Consortium of Retail Teaching Companies. It provides reasons why graduate recruitment is considered to be strategic to the future of the industry and outlines the programme of the Consortium since 1988.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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