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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2010

Nick Welch and Angelo Fernandes

This article describes the development of the Supported to Independent Living project (SIL), which is for the support and care for people with mental health needs in…

Abstract

This article describes the development of the Supported to Independent Living project (SIL), which is for the support and care for people with mental health needs in Oxfordshire to live as independently as possible in ordinary housing in the community. The project is a partnership between NHS Oxfordshire (Primary Care Trust), the Oxfordshire Supporting People programme and Oxfordshire County Council Social and Community Services.Although there was a very vigorous development of community living for people with longstanding mental health needs through the provision of group homes, particularly in Oxford City that started in 1963, there has not been an overall strategy for the development of mental health services for the County as a whole. The needs of a diverse, younger, often more mobile and potentially more challenging group of service users for housing with appropriate care and support have not been met.A joint strategy between the County Council and the Primary Care Trust (PCT) to meet these needs has therefore been developed that introduces a pathway of linked accommodation and support arrangements. These range from intensive support through to floating support in the community, and are intended to offer individuals a guided pathway away from specialist services to more mainstream provision. The services are based on the principles of recovery, personalisation and ordinary housing.As well as achieving significantly reconfigured services the strategy has to deliver savings to meet the cuts imposed on the Supporting People programme grant by Central Government.The project has involved the PCT and the County Council in close partnership working, and important and significant involvement of and engagement with service users and carers. A framework agreement has been agreed by all of the organisations involved. It sets out the roles and responsibilities of each and covers local government, the NHS, housing and support.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

José Ângelo Guerreiro da Silva, Raquel Curto Fernandes e Castro Ribeiro, Ana de Carvalho Cameira Mocinho Viras and Catarina Bentes Silva Grilo

The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), set specific targets for halting biodiversity loss, including the need to establish 10 per cent of coastal/marine areas…

Abstract

Purpose

The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), set specific targets for halting biodiversity loss, including the need to establish 10 per cent of coastal/marine areas conserved through, among other things, well‐connected systems of protected areas by 2020. The reality is that whereas nearly 15 per cent of land is protected, just over 1 per cent of marine space is similarly protected. The challenge is to reach “a global representative system” of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), recognizing that countries need to establish cooperative mechanisms at ecoregion level. The purpose of this paper is to address the options and trends for countries to develop transboundary cooperation through MPAs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors address several case studies, focusing on political, governance and financing frameworks.

Findings

The main findings revealed that countries use MoU, MoA or Joint Declaration supported on international conventions as the WHC, Ramsar Convention and CMS. Governance models seem to include political/management/technical levels, with political decisions translated into action plans carried out by joint committees, supported by national institutions and scientific/technical boards. Also the involvement of civil society in management is a growing driving force. Financing transboundary MPAs is going through an evolutionary process, from an exclusive binomial national budgets/UNEP‐GEF to a wider financial net through ecotourism income and private donors.

Originality/value

The different solutions found point out myriad possibilities where transboundary cooperation is envisaged. States can benefit from the experiences already acquired to jointly achieve the target of protecting 10 per cent of the marine environment by 2020.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Niaz Bashiri Behmiri, João Fernandes Rebelo, Sofia Gouveia and Patrícia António

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the determinants of export performance literature. The authors investigate the effect of firm characteristics on the Douro…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the determinants of export performance literature. The authors investigate the effect of firm characteristics on the Douro region wine firms export performance. The authors consider the Douro region, as it has the Portugal highest wine classification, the appellation d’origine contrôlée and undertakes the first position in the Portuguese wine production and export.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply a pooling cross-sectional data set that includes 427 observations. The authors pooled two cross sections consisting of 214 and 213 firms for the years 2014 and 215, respectively. The firm export intensity and propensity are the dependent variables. Moreover, the firm size, age and productive efficiency are accounted as the firm characteristics. The authors use the ordinary least squares regression and the tobit and probit models for estimations.

Findings

First, size is an influential factor to improve the export performance, and the importance of size is higher for younger firms. Second, there is a positive response from export intensity to age and this response is higher for smaller firms. However, there is a negative response from the export propensity to age and this negative response is higher for bigger firms. Third, there is weak evidence to support a relationship between efficiency and export performance.

Research limitations/implications

This research and the presented results are undoubtedly under some limitations. The main limitation is about the data availability for all characteristics of a firm. For example, it will enrich the result if the authors add some other important variables such as production cost, research and development expenditure and the quality of produced wine by each firm to our analysis.

Originality/value

This research reveals that the influence of firm characteristics on the export performance of Portuguese wine firms is missing in the literature. The results provide a basis to Portuguese wineries to improve their export performance by applying the relevant strategies.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Laís Rodrigues, Alessandra de Sá Mello da Costa and Marcus Wilcox Hemais

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how, in three different contexts, the National Council for Advertising Self-Regulation narratively uses its past to build an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how, in three different contexts, the National Council for Advertising Self-Regulation narratively uses its past to build an official history concerning its origins that legitimates advertising self-control as a hegemonic narrative.

Design/methodology/approach

By using the historical research and the “uses of the past” approach, this study identifies, analyzes and confronts three organizational histories of Conar’s origins (both its official and unofficial versions) in the context of the creation of the Brazilian system of advertising self-regulation.

Findings

After a thematic analysis of the documentary sources, the narratives on the National Council for Advertising Self-Regulation’s origins and the self-control process were grouped into three versions: the narrative under the military regime: 1976/1980; the narrative during the process of re-democratization of the country: 1981/1991 and the contemporary narrative: from 2005 onwards. These narratives were confronted and, in consequence, provided, each of them, a different interpretation of the context surrounding the creation and justification for advertising self-control.

Originality/value

The study shows how a consumer defense organization re-historicized its past strategically to gain legitimacy in three different ways through time. It also reveals that organizations strategically use their past to build an intended vision of the future, thus having more agency than the hegemonic literature in management studies usually guarantees. Finally, it exposes the malleability of past narratives through which organizations play a critical role in the ongoing struggle for competing uses of the past. Therefore, the study identifies different organizational stories through time that allow researchers to reflect on several strategic uses of the past by organizations.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Francesco Gangi, Eugenio D'Angelo, Lucia Michela Daniele and Nicola Varrone

This paper aims to provide new evidence on firm-specific determinants and effects of corporate social and environmental responsibility (CSER) in the food industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide new evidence on firm-specific determinants and effects of corporate social and environmental responsibility (CSER) in the food industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study is designed to empirically answer dual related research questions. First, we investigate the extent to which effective corporate governance (CG) mechanisms foster CSER. Second, we analyse the impact of CSER engagement on corporate financial performance (CFP). Consistent with the research design, to avoid sample selection bias, the authors employed Heckman two-step model (1979) to a worldwide sample of 324 food firms between 2011 and 2017.

Findings

The findings of the study reveal that effective board characteristics foster CSER engagement. Furthermore, CSER engagement is a positive predictor of improved profitability and also reduces the cost of debt (COD).

Originality/value

This article has elements of originality regarding the research questions, the context and the method. First, the authors demonstrate that CSER is a “missing link” between CG and CFP in the food industry. The authors’ contribution complements the debate on CSER and CFP through the stakeholder theory, the resource-based view and the innovation management perspective. They disentangle the effect of CG from the impact of social and environmental responsibility after correcting for endogeneity bias. The implications of the study contribute to a win-win scenario for companies investing in CG that result in higher CSER engagement, better profits and lower cost of capital.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Eduardo Flores, Elionor Farah Jreige Weffort, Aldy Fernandes da Silva and L. Nelson G. Carvalho

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether macroeconomic crises are a motivational factor for earnings management practices by the companies listed in the capital…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether macroeconomic crises are a motivational factor for earnings management practices by the companies listed in the capital markets of Brazil and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 7,932 firm-quarter observations from listed Brazilian companies and 99,931 from listed US companies, covering a 13-year period (1998-2010). The authors developed regression models for the panel data, taking into account discretionary accruals as an earnings management proxy (dependent variable), while crises were regarded as a macroeconomic factor (dummy variable of interest). Also considered were return on assets, market-to-book ratio, size, leverage, foreign direct investment, income taxes, quarters, and sectors, which were treated as control variables.

Findings

The results corroborate the conceptual issues involved in undertaking this study, and they demonstrate that in periods of macroeconomic crises, companies are more motivated to employ earnings management practices both in Brazil and in the USA.

Originality/value

Unlike previous studies, the model developed in our research includes multiple macroeconomic crises simultaneously. Furthermore, it was applied in two markets at different stages of development and operating in distinct institutional contexts, which indicates its viability for replication for a large number of countries.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Carlos M.P. Sousa, Ji Yan, Emanuel Gomes and Jorge Lengler

The paper examines the impact of export activity on productivity and how this effect is moderated by R&D investment and foreign ownership.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper examines the impact of export activity on productivity and how this effect is moderated by R&D investment and foreign ownership.

Design/methodology/approach

A time-lag effect is taken into account when examining the proposed model. Data are collected from the Annual Industrial Survey of the National Bureau of Statistics of China. A dataset containing 117,340 firms across the sample period (2001–2007) are used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that while R&D investment plays a significant role in strengthening the positive effect of export activity on a firm's productivity, foreign ownership surprisingly has a negative moderating role.

Originality/value

Scholarly interest in the links between export activity and productivity is on the rise. However, the bulk of research has been focused on understanding the effects of export activity on productivity at the country or industry level. Little has been done at the firm level. Another gap in the literature is that the mechanism through which the impact of export activity can be leveraged to enhance the firm's productivity has been largely ignored. To address these issues, the study adopts the learning-by-exporting theory to examine the relationship between export and productivity at the firm-level and how R&D investment and foreign ownership may explain how learning can be leveraged to enhance the firm's productivity. Finally, these relationships are examined in the context of firms from an emerging market, China, which is especially relevant for the learning-by-exporting argument used in this study.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2021

Gabriela Barrère, Andrés Jung and Diego Karsaclian

The purpose of this paper is to identify different outcomes in the relation innovation–exports for a firm located in a developing country, depending upon the destination…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify different outcomes in the relation innovation–exports for a firm located in a developing country, depending upon the destination market of its exports (i.e. a developed or a developing economy).

Design/methodology/approach

The specification strategy is a bivariate probit regression model applied to 640 Uruguayan manufacturing firms. Two simultaneous equations are used to estimate the probability of being an exporting or innovating firm. For both equations, the firm’s innovative activity and export status in the past are introduced as explanatory variables to solve endogeneity issues.

Findings

When firms located in a developing economy export to another developing country, the authors find that innovation precedes exports, in line with what they would expect according to theory. When the export market is a developed economy, firms are not able to cope with both innovation and export strategies simultaneously, whether innovating to access export markets or transforming knowledge from exports into innovation.

Research limitations/implications

Causality could not be found and endogeneity problems were not solved. The data are limited to a sample of Uruguayan manufacturing firms during six years between 2010 and 2015, and authors do not know when did the firms began to export either to a developed or a developing economy. Furthermore, the database indicates if a developed economy is between the three main export markets of the firm or not, but authors do not know what kind of products (i.e. their technological level) are exported by the firm to that destination.

Originality/value

Although the link between innovation and exports is an important topic for firms and policymakers, the main bulk of empirical studies has ignored the role of destination markets. This study attempts to fill this gap contributing to a better understanding of the differences in the relation between innovation and exports (i.e. its sequence), when the destination market is a developed or a developing economy.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Abstract

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Marco Cucculelli, Cristina Bettinelli and Angelo Renoldi

The purpose of this paper is to focus on how investments in research and development (R&D) and advertising affect the performance of small- and medium-sized enterprises…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on how investments in research and development (R&D) and advertising affect the performance of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) during recessions.

Design/methodology/approach

Contingency theory is applied to a data set of 376 Italian clothing SMEs during the period 2000-2010 to test whether investment in R&D and advertising impacts financial performance differently when contingent factors (such as market share, financial leverage and business model change) are taken into account.

Findings

Empirical results confirm that market share and leverage moderate the effects of investments in R&D and advertising (i.e. intangibles) on performance, and also that changes in business models are an important contingent factor that explains performance. Specifically, the paper ascertains that a novelty-centered business model, together with investments in intangibles, positively affects performance during recessions.

Originality/value

This study offers an input to the debate on how SMEs develop and sustain their competitive advantage during the recession. It contributes to existent theory by showing whether and how contingencies, such as a firm's market share and leverage, moderate the relationship between performance and investments in R&D and advertising in SMEs. Second, it addresses the call for additional data “about the strategic effects of business models and how they influence the positioning of firms in their competitive environment” (Amit and Zott, 2008, p. 20) by introducing business model change/innovation as a new contingency factor and by empirically testing its effects on “objective measures of firm performance” (Bock et al., 2012, p. 301).

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