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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Nicole K. Lee, Angela M. Harney and Amy E. Pennay

The aim of this paper is to examine the temporal sequencing of methamphetamine use and the onset of mental health problems among a sample of dependent methamphetamine users.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the temporal sequencing of methamphetamine use and the onset of mental health problems among a sample of dependent methamphetamine users.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a self‐reported timeline method to examine the sequencing of first use, regular use and problematic use of methamphetamine and mental health issues among 126 users with lifetime dependence.

Findings

The majority of the sample (69 per cent) reported previous mental health diagnosis or treatment. Of this sample, 22 per cent reported mental health problems prior to their first use of methamphetamine and 72 per cent reported mental health problems after first use of methamphetamine (with the rest around the same time or unsure). On the timeline, mental health symptoms were first indicated around a year after first regular use of methamphetamine and around the same time as problematic use. Respondents identified a lag time of five years between first problematic use of methamphetamine and seeking treatment for methamphetamine‐related problems, but those that received mental health treatment engaged in methamphetamine treatment earlier.

Practical implications

Among this sample, mental health problems coincided with problematic methamphetamine use (rather than any use) suggesting prevention efforts may be better directed at preventing transition to heavy use or use of potent forms or injecting, rather than directed at prevention of uptake. On this basis, stepped care might be appropriate for methamphetamine users.

Originality/value

Despite a substantial research literature establishing the link between methamphetamine use and mental health problems, little is known about the order of onset and the implications of this for treatment. This is one of the few studies specifically investigating the temporal sequencing of methamphetamine use, mental health symptoms and treatment seeking among a sample of dependent methamphetamine users.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2011

Nicole K. Lee, Jacqui Cameron, Angela Harney and Sandra Roeg

Dissemination of good practice information to practitioners is one of the great challenges of the substance abuse treatment sector. The authors' understanding of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Dissemination of good practice information to practitioners is one of the great challenges of the substance abuse treatment sector. The authors' understanding of the process by which research is translated is limited, but a whole of workforce approach is considered best practice. This paper aims to examine organisational change as a result of a workforce capacity‐building program over six months.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 195 staff (nine service managers, 39 supervisors and 147 clinicians) in 13 alcohol and other drug (AOD) services across Australia participated in mental health screening and brief intervention training using PsyCheck. PsyCheck is designed to detect and address common mental health symptoms among drug treatment clients. The Dual Diagnosis Capability in Addiction Treatment (DDCAT) index was used to measure capacity before and after training.

Findings

There was no significant difference between baseline and follow‐up DDCAT scores; however, the level of PsyCheck implementation indicated improvement in DDCAT scores.

Practical implications

The results show that where organisations implement the program successfully, capacity improves; where the program is not well implemented, capacity reduces. Successful implementers report a number of common elements: the screening tool was implemented into routine assessment; there was a single onsite “champion” supporting the implementation; and they worked with the staff and persisted with the implementation even where there was initial worker resistance.

Originality/value

This paper provides the opportunity to assess workforce capacity building and the feasibility of utilising the DCCAT to measure co‐occurring mental health and substance use disorders in Australian AOD services.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Samantha L. Jordan, Andreas Wihler, Wayne A. Hochwarter and Gerald R. Ferris

Introduced into the literature a decade ago, grit originally defined as perseverance and passion for long-term goals has stimulated considerable research on positive…

Abstract

Introduced into the literature a decade ago, grit originally defined as perseverance and passion for long-term goals has stimulated considerable research on positive effects primarily in the academic and military contexts, as well as attracted widespread media attention. Despite recent criticism regarding grit’s construct and criterion-related validity, research on grit has begun to spill over into the work context as well. In this chapter, the authors provide an overview of the initial theoretical foundations of grit as a motivational driver, and present newer conceptualizations on the mechanisms of grit’s positive effects rooted in goal-setting theory. Furthermore, the authors also draw attention to existing shortcomings of the current definition and measurement of grit, and their implications for its scientific and practical application. After establishing a theoretical understanding, the authors discuss the potential utility of grit for human resource management, related to staffing and recruitment, development and training, and performance management systems as well as performance evaluations. The authors conclude this chapter with a discussion of necessary and potential future research, and consider the practical implications of grit in its current state.

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2019

Khuram Shahzad, Pia Arenius, Alan Muller, Muhammad Athar Rasheed and Sami Ullah Bajwa

The purpose of this paper is to explore the black box between high-performance work systems (HPWS) and innovation performance in small- and medium-sized enterprises…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the black box between high-performance work systems (HPWS) and innovation performance in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Through application of the ability, motivation and opportunity (AMO) framework, the study examines the mediating roles of innovation-specific ability, motivation and voice behaviors between HPWS and SMEs’ innovation performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested on data collected through a self-administered questionnaire from 237 SMEs in Pakistan.

Findings

Findings indicate that human capital, motivation and employee voice fully mediate the relationship between HPWS and innovation performance in SMEs.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional research design and self-reported measures warrant caution for the interpretation of findings. Future research may consider a longitudinal research design and objective measures.

Practical implications

SMEs need to invest in the adoption and implementation of HPWS that will develop innovation-specific abilities, motivation and voice behaviors simultaneously among employees that will lead to higher innovation performance.

Originality/value

This is the first study of its kind utilizing an AMO framework to investigate the underlying mechanism through which HPWS affect innovation performance in SMEs.

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