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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Angela Y. Lee, Greg Merkley and Bob Bailey

Wrigley launched Eclipse gum in August 1999. In early 2000, Paul Chibe became senior marketing manager for Wrigley's breath freshening portfolio, which included Eclipse…

Abstract

Wrigley launched Eclipse gum in August 1999. In early 2000, Paul Chibe became senior marketing manager for Wrigley's breath freshening portfolio, which included Eclipse. With the disappointing first-year performance of the brand, Chibe needed to take action to turn Eclipse around. His task was to use the opinions from other Wrigley executives and from marketing research data to decide if Eclipse could be turned around or if it should be abandoned.

After reading and analyzing the case, students should be able to:

  • Identify the most important variables that drive the success of consumer package goods brands

  • Interpret and use data from various types of marketing research to evaluate marketing mix strategies

  • Develop fact-based marketing recommendations

Identify the most important variables that drive the success of consumer package goods brands

Interpret and use data from various types of marketing research to evaluate marketing mix strategies

Develop fact-based marketing recommendations

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Angela Y. Lee and Vasilia Kilibarda Funston

This case puts students in the shoes of Mexican entrepreneur Rodolfo Corcuera of the tech startup Aliada, an online platform that matches maids with customers in Mexico…

Abstract

This case puts students in the shoes of Mexican entrepreneur Rodolfo Corcuera of the tech startup Aliada, an online platform that matches maids with customers in Mexico City. With backing from one of Mexico City's newest venture capital firms, Corcuera's business now needs to scale, and he is considering how best to position his offering to those on whom his business model depends–maids and customers. To tackle this, students will learn about basic concepts from psychology that can inform marketers. More specifically, they will learn how basic human needs (nurturance, security) fuel self-regulatory goals (promotion and prevention goals, respectively), which in turn impact how people approach their consumption goals. Students will analyze Aliada's current Facebook ads, watch videos of some of Aliada's current maids and customers to assess whether they seem more motivated by promotion or prevention goals, and recommend optimal messaging for Facebook ads and subway banners in order for Corcuera to be most appealing to these two target audiences who may have different motivations.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Rachel Takriti, Nicholas P. Mann and Angela J. Lee

Reports a study investigating teenage attitudes towards bicycle helmets. A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 1,093 11‐16‐year‐olds to assess their helmet…

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Abstract

Reports a study investigating teenage attitudes towards bicycle helmets. A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 1,093 11‐16‐year‐olds to assess their helmet ownership and use and their attitudes towards bicycle helmets. More 11‐13‐year‐olds owned cycle helmets than 14‐16‐year‐olds, with similar wearing rates across age. Girls placed more importance on whether helmet wearing was compulsory at school and comfort of helmets, while boys placed more importance on whether helmet wearing was compulsory by law. Those who owned helmets were more likely to place importance on whether wearing a helmet was law and whether it was a school rule than were those who did not own helmets. The 11‐13‐year‐olds placed more importance on whether helmet wearing was compulsory at school and by law, while 14‐16‐year‐olds placed more importance on comfort, appearance, cost, and their friends’ opinions as reasons.

Details

Health Education, vol. 101 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Lan Xia and Kent B. Monroe

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Eric C.W. Lou, Angela Lee and Yoke Mui Lim

While there is an established body of literature that discusses the importance of stakeholder management, and also the need for involvement of all stakeholders so that all…

Abstract

Purpose

While there is an established body of literature that discusses the importance of stakeholder management, and also the need for involvement of all stakeholders so that all values of a heritage site can be captured in a heritage management plan, the concepts are not generally developed in ways that make them useful in practice. This research seeks to bring greater clarity to the practice of stakeholder engagement in built heritage, so that organisations can manage their stakeholders in ways that meet their strategic goals. This study proposes a novel method to identify stakeholders, a stakeholder preference mapping approach, which will depict their influence on decisions based on a of power-interest scale.

Design/methodology/approach

This research posits a stakeholder preference mapping approach. Virtual Stakeholder Groups (VSG) were identified and stakeholder's significance impacts were measured using the RIBA Plan of Work 2013 to determine in-depth consideration of each stakeholder's power and interest against differing stages of a heritage project. Participants were convened through a 5-day workshop, consisting of 20 Malaysian and 19 international participants (80% academics and 20% Malaysian civil servants). The Multi-Attribute Decision Analysis (MADA) technique was then used to demonstrate how stakeholder identification and analysis can be used to help heritage teams meet their mandates.

Findings

The research identified eight virtual VSG (Extremist, Expert, Economic, Social, Governance and Tourists) and their scale of power-interest influence at different stages of the heritage management process. The findings reveal varying levels of engagement from each of the different groups of stakeholders at each work stage – with Stage 5 (Construction) being the least engaged.

Originality/value

It is anticipated that through stakeholder preference mapping, heritage teams can increase the robustness of their strategies by identifying and effectively managing the important concepts; heritage teams can effectively manage the interface between the many (often competing) demands of differing stakeholders. Using Georgetown as a case study, the research team were able to delineate the interaction and interplay between the various stakeholders in the complex decision-making processes for a UNESCO heritage site. Applying the RIBA 2013 Plan of Work as a framework to the heritage management process enables a formalised mapping approach to the process.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Justine Cooper, Angela Lee and Keith Jones

This paper aims to identify key performance indicators (KPIs), and their corresponding attributes, required to successfully manage asset management sustainably in a built…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify key performance indicators (KPIs), and their corresponding attributes, required to successfully manage asset management sustainably in a built environment context. Improving the sustainability of existing housing stock is a major challenge facing the UK social housing sector. There is a lack of support to navigate the growing and often incongruent information relating to sustainable development and how to operationalise it. The problem is twofold; first, the current (single criterion) condition-based approach to maintenance planning constrains asset managers and does not fully address the social, environmental and economic aspects of sustainability. Second, the toolkits available for assessing the sustainability of housing are often generic and are time consuming and expensive to implement.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports the findings of a participatory research project with a leading London-based housing association, using a series of landlord and tenant workshops to derive a set of attributes associated with KPIs to fully reflect the local requirements of the landlord and their interpretation of the sustainability agenda. Five KPIs are considered to be measurable, directly affected by maintenance work and independent of each other were identified by this landlord (comfort, running costs, adaptability, maintenance costs and community).

Findings

The resulting outputs, in a policy context, will provide a clear route map to social housing landlords of how to improve the sustainability of their housing stock with the additional benefits of addressing fuel poverty and carbon emission targets, whilst at the same time, help create and maintain housing in which people want to live.

Originality/value

The proposed approach is flexible enough to incorporate the individual requirements of landlords and be able to adapt to changes in government policy (local and central) in a timely, robust, transparent and inclusive format.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Monika Sharma and Angela Lee

Preserving our built heritage from the onslaught of weather, pollution, development and the effects of tourism is a complex endeavour. Appended to this is the need to…

Abstract

Purpose

Preserving our built heritage from the onslaught of weather, pollution, development and the effects of tourism is a complex endeavour. Appended to this is the need to ensure that heritage buildings are inclusive to all users. Thus, built heritage is plagued with contradictions and conflict between conservation goals and those to support inclusivity given the limited resources often available. Dementia has been purposely selected for this study as numbers of diagnosed sufferers are increasing at an alarming rate, and enagement with heritage has been proven to support well-being. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This research review draws on systematic principles and presents an analysis of the available literature on well-being programmes designed for people living with dementia and their care supporters, with particular reference to programmes in heritage settings, and the resulting impact for users.

Findings

This review critically evaluates the available evidence from published literature on the role of the heritage setting, on how it impacts on the experience of dementia participants. In doing so, it draws on findings from the experiences and well-being of people living with dementia and their care supporters; assesses the current state of knowledge, identifies support implications and makes recommendations for future research. In doing so, it highlights a dearth in the literature on research related to the physical environment setting, particular addressing any cognitive impairments that may arise that can alter psychosocial processes, such as lighting, temperature, acoustics and materiality, so that they can be understood and suitably adapted to support the well-being of those living with dementia.

Originality/value

The scant lack of financial resources to support inclusivity in built heritage, and the argument that some heritage cannot be adapted, often leads to only limited opportune for people with dementia. Thus, there is an inherent need for an understanding of current research and well-being programmes so that it can be focalled in the future to support built heritage tourism in a way that it is inclusive to all.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2019

Yingchun Ji, Angela Lee and William Swan

There is a clear consensus that improving energy efficiency of existing housing stock is necessary to meet the UK’s legally binding carbon emission targets by 2050. The…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a clear consensus that improving energy efficiency of existing housing stock is necessary to meet the UK’s legally binding carbon emission targets by 2050. The purpose of this paper is to assess the energy saving potentials from building retrofit using an end-terrace house, similar houses represent about 30 per cent of the existing building stock in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The Salford Energy House – a unique pre-1919 Victorian end-terrace house built within an environmental chamber – was used. Retrofit modelling analysis was carried out using IESVE – a dynamic thermal simulation tool. The retrofitted model was also evaluated using future projected climate data (CIBSE latest release) to examine energy demands and overheating.

Findings

Findings show that improving building fabric thermal characteristics can reduce space heating demands substantially. Heating modes, set point preferences and infiltration level all have strong impact on heating demands. Space heating demand savings can be as much as 77 per cent when the property facades were upgraded to the similar requirements of Passivhaus standards. The research implicates that, for dwelling retrofit practices, a whole house holistic approach should be the preferred option to improve energy efficiency. With future climate scenarios where temperatures are potentially elevated, the heating demands can be potentially reduced as much as 27 per cent.

Practical implications

The likelihood of overheating in dwellings after a deep retrofit due to future elevated temperatures becomes apparent. Therefore, mitigation of overheating risk becomes a necessity for future domestic housing stock retrofit planning and policy making.

Originality/value

The research presented in this paper highlights the effectiveness of various retrofit measures individually as well as holistically, also the implications on energy demands and the likelihood of overheating in dwellings under future climate scenarios.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Angela Lee‐Foster

Sense, the leading national charity that supports and campaigns for children and adults who are deafblind, set up the Capacity to Communicate Project in response to the…

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Abstract

Sense, the leading national charity that supports and campaigns for children and adults who are deafblind, set up the Capacity to Communicate Project in response to the new role of independent mental capacity advocates created by the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (HM Government, 2005). The project provided training and information, harnessing best practice around communication and advocacy for people who lack capacity and who have little or no formal communication, in particular those with a dual sensory loss. As part of the training, advocates were asked to submit a written assignment. These case studies, including some adult protection cases, have given us valuable information about the nature and process of independent mental capacity advocacy and what can be done to improve this relatively new statutory role, in particular developing better understanding, skills and processes around communication in order to represent and protect vulnerable adults.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Angela Smith

This paper aims to focus on the experiences and observations of a black disabled woman in the UK.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the experiences and observations of a black disabled woman in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a personal commentary from a black disabled woman who uses health and social care services in the UK. It details the author's disability and some recent barriers that she has faced in using services.

Findings

The author gives some examples of her recent experiences in relation to employment, independent living, healthcare providers and getting her wheelchair repaired.

Originality/value

The paper offers the unique perspective of a service user on UK health and social care services.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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1 – 10 of 520