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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2011

Elisa F. Topper

The purpose of this paper is to examine one academic library and how the staff dealt with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine one academic library and how the staff dealt with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of the Tulane Recovery Center in New Orleans that was created after Hurricane Katrina in cooperation with Library Associates Companies (LAC).

Findings

Institutions may have a disaster plan outlined as to what to do in an emergency but in actuality one is never fully prepared for a natural disaster.

Originality/value

This paper examines the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina on the Howard‐Tilton Memorial Library at Tulane University and the creation of the Tulane Recovery Center, which can serve as a model for other to follow.

Details

New Library World, vol. 112 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Andy Corrigan

This paper aims to describe the experience of the largest among many academic libraries in New Orleans severely impacted by Hurricane Katrina. In this case, at Tulane…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the experience of the largest among many academic libraries in New Orleans severely impacted by Hurricane Katrina. In this case, at Tulane University, a remarkable early effort was undertaken to save collections and stabilize flooded library buildings. Other daunting challenges followed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports observations on critical aspects of the library's recovery, which was still ongoing at the time of this writing more than two years after the hurricane.

Findings

The paper draws preliminary conclusions about disaster planning and response to actual disasters.

Originality/value

The event covered maybe unprecedented in many ways even apart from its scale, since its location was a major city that was almost entirely evacuated apart from military personnel. Effective disaster response is a context sensitive and complex undertaking. In this case special problems arose initially in just responding to the scene and later in ways connected to the staggering scope of the damage to the region surrounding. Nonetheless, tapping the expertise and resources of a skilled disaster mitigation company, Tulane and its library were able to stage a broad recovery effort.

Details

Library Management, vol. 29 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Andy Corrigan

Aims to compare and contrast different collection policies and shows a practical application of web‐based documentation.

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to compare and contrast different collection policies and shows a practical application of web‐based documentation.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is a case study and general review that discusses how significant numbers of libraries today are posting collection policies on the web, how these policies may differ in form and practice from those of the past, and how the Howard‐Tilton Memorial Library at Tulane University developed and applied one such policy of its own. It also discusses examples of relevant literature and other collection policy web sites.

Findings

Its implications point to the value of developing sets of narrative collection policy statements focusing on specific academic disciplines and of beginning the policy‐making process with an assessment of the academic profile of the university that the library supports.

Originality/value

General discussion of collection policies has been absent from the literature for some time and the article should be valuable to those libraries without collection policies or those with older printed policies languishing in file cabinets.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2009

Karleen Gwinner, Marie Knox and Sue Hacking

Arts participation fosters social inclusion in a way that other social and recovery programmes do not. The professional role of an artist is an appealing and socially…

Abstract

Arts participation fosters social inclusion in a way that other social and recovery programmes do not. The professional role of an artist is an appealing and socially valid role in the community. For many people with a mental illness, arts‐based programmes become a catalyst to resume and/or pursue their art practice more seriously. The focus of this paper is to uncover the complex boundaries that exist for artists who have mental health needs in contemporary culture, and to review these artists' perceptions of their opportunities to create a place for their creative expression to emerge in its own right, and not on the basis of their illness. We also comment on the specific issue of public perception of the ‘outsider artist’ and refer in parts to the apparent question of how such art is perceived and treated. This paper refers specifically to the experiences of eight visual artists with mental illnesses living in Queensland, Australia, who contributed to an exhibition titled Artist Citizen as part of a participatory action research programme. The topics of discussion by the eight artists explore familiar themes to mental health: stigma, exclusion and the integration of identity within limited membership groups. This paper details the expressed concerns of the artists around the value and connection of their creative output. It should be relevant and of interest to mental health service personnel for insight into integration and recovery for people with mental health needs into mainstream social and cultural environments.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Kerry Jacobs and Steve Evans

This paper aims to explore how accounting is entwined in the cultural practice of popular music. Particular attention is paid to how the accountant is constricted by…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how accounting is entwined in the cultural practice of popular music. Particular attention is paid to how the accountant is constricted by artists in art and the role(s) the accountant plays in the artistic narrative. In effect this explores the notion that there is a tension between the notion of the bourgeois world of “the accountant” and the world of “art for art's sake”.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the cultural theory of Pierre Bourdieu to understand how the character of the accountant is constructed and used by the artist. Particular attention is paid in this respect to the biography and lyrics of the Beatles.

Findings

Accounting and accountants play both the hero and the villain. By rejecting the “accountant villain”, the artist identifies with and reinforces artistic purity and credibility. However, in order to achieve the economic benefits and maintain the balance between the “art” and the “money”, the economic prudence of the bourgeois accountant is required (although it might be resented).

Research limitations/implications

The analysis focuses on a relatively small range of musicians and is dominated by the biography of the Beatles. A further range of musicians and artists would extend this work. Further research could also be constructed to more fully consider the consumption, rather than just the production, of art and cultural products and performances.

Originality/value

This paper is a novel consideration of how accounting stereotypes are constructed and used in the field of artistic creation

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 April 2019

Camelia Fawzy and Brenda Shore

Abstract

Details

The Inclusive Management Strategy: Engineering Culture Change for Employees with DisAbilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-195-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Martin Jackson and Andy Sloane

This paper aims to provide a review of information and communication technology (ICT) models and frameworks in the implementation of one communication technique namely…

Abstract

This paper aims to provide a review of information and communication technology (ICT) models and frameworks in the implementation of one communication technique namely electronic data interchange (EDI). The main body of this paper describes and explains the usage of these tools and any specific industries in which they are applied. The tools are then individually analysed and then compared for similarities, dissimilarities, and their associated attributes. The methodology used divides the models into two categories, electronic data interchange specific and more generic. A set of integrated questions based on conceptual, research, and practical issues are then applied. These answers are rated, using a Likert type scale system, and then compared. This analysis informs the construction of a generic model for inter‐organisational analysis, and conclusions concerning approaches are discussed. The analysis also forms the basis for the model selection process in specific scenarios.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Jessica Gale, Jane Clarbour and Kelly Rayner

Literature suggests that mentally disordered offenders are considerably more difficult to treat and slower to respond to psychological treatment. Less is known about the…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature suggests that mentally disordered offenders are considerably more difficult to treat and slower to respond to psychological treatment. Less is known about the particular factors that can contribute to this resistance. A more comprehensive understanding of the factors that treating psychologists feel can promote or inhibit progression through rehabilitative treatment may increase the likelihood of positive clinical outcomes. This paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Four practising psychologists employed within a male medium- and low-secure forensic unit in the North East of England took part in a semi-structured interview. Their views, opinions and experiences regarding patient progression through treatment pathways were recorded, transcribed and analysed.

Findings

This thematic analysis identified that numerous patient-specific parameters influenced perceived progression, and environmental and external factors had a significant impact on the patients’ expressed attitude towards treatment.

Practical implications

Alongside issues of motivation and engagement, participants identified external factors that influence perceived treatment success with their forensic patients.

Originality/value

Additional research is needed to identify the factors that are the most influential in promoting or inhibiting perceived and actual progress. This will hopefully optimise treatment engagement and the motivation to change problematic behaviours in mentally disordered offenders.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2021

Murray Smith

Abstract

Details

The Canterbury Sound in Popular Music: Scene, Identity and Myth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-490-3

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Martin L. Jackson and Andy Sloane

To provide an organisation or supply chain with the means to analyse their current business foundations prior to the adoption of a new technology for the assessment of…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide an organisation or supply chain with the means to analyse their current business foundations prior to the adoption of a new technology for the assessment of successful adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives were to analyse and aid the successful adoption of new technology. This was achieved by the construction of three models from previously conducted research focusing on electronic commerce for application research.

Findings

The research clearly identified a link between an organisation's structure and ease of new technology adoption. This link is the bind between the categories developed for the models and reflects “best fit” for generic organisational analysis.

Research limitations/implications

A questionnaire was used to fuel the models. It included evenly weighted questions. This led to the category results being based on mid‐point scaling. Both the weighing and model scaling are to be addressed in further research assisted by the results from the application of the questionnaire, models, results and organisation follow‐up analysis.

Practical implications

The models provide a pre‐adoption analysis that can produce a general view towards success, with relatively no expenditure.

Originality/value

The three models are new. The target model is the main construction that has been developed over a number of years. The construction comprises of human resources, processes, organisational culture, and management styles, these elements have not been brought together in this way before to analyse the adoption of new technology in an organisation or supply chain. The models are generic and can be applied to all industries and types of business.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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