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Article

Andy Betts, Ian McGonagle, Ian Baguley, Christine Jackson and Carol Callinan

The Care Programme Approach (CPA) is the fundamental framework for supporting the care and treatment of individuals with severe and complex mental health needs. National…

Abstract

The Care Programme Approach (CPA) is the fundamental framework for supporting the care and treatment of individuals with severe and complex mental health needs. National consultations with stakeholders (Department of Health, 2006) identified a lack of consistency in the implementation of the CPA across England, informed fresh guidance (Department of Health, 2008a) and highlighted the need for a valid and flexible training initiative to support the workforce in this important aspect of their practice. In response, a partnership team was commissioned by the Department of Health to design and disseminate such a learning resource. This paper details the first impressions of this resource from those who requested the materials and subsequently responded with an online evaluation questionnaire (n=27).These early responses demonstrate that the CPA learning resource is viewed by respondents as flexible, easy‐to‐use and comprehensive. In addition, DVD narratives of professionals, service users and carers' experiences of CPA in adult mental health services were identified as valuable elements of the resource as they assist trainers in the illustration of critical themes. Further results explore its utility in the training environment and highlight flexibility of delivery as an important feature. This enables the resource to be integrated with existing training materials or to guide the development of new training initiatives. As further evaluations are collected and analysed, they will feed into a process of incremental improvement of the learning package to ensure that it meets the requirements of the multidisciplinary workforce.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Abstract

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The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article

Michele Hilton Boon and Vivian Howard

Analyzes selected Canadian public libraries' holdings of young adult fiction with gay, lesbian, bisexual and/or transgender content published between 1998 and 2002 in…

Abstract

Analyzes selected Canadian public libraries' holdings of young adult fiction with gay, lesbian, bisexual and/or transgender content published between 1998 and 2002 in order to measure access to such fiction and to determine whether any evidence of bias on the part of selectors exists. Identifies 35 titles published between 1998 and 2002, a slight decrease from the previous five‐year period. These titles attracted 34 percent fewer reviews per title as compared to a randomly selected control group of non‐lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender fiction for teens (LGBT) titles. On average, in the nine Canadian public libraries studied, significantly fewer copies of each LGBT title were held, as compared to the list of control titles. Without further investigation, the paper could not conclude whether this difference constitutes evidence of significant bias on the part of selectors. However, the data do show that certain libraries are significantly more likely to purchase the control titles that the LGBT titles, and that access to these titles varies according to one's location in Canada.

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Collection Building, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Abstract

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Sport Business in Leading Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-564-3

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Library Hi Tech News, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article

Alistair Brandon‐Jones, Niall Piercy and Nigel Slack

The aim of this review and of the papers in this special issue is to critically examine different approaches to teaching operations management (OM) in order to provoke and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this review and of the papers in this special issue is to critically examine different approaches to teaching operations management (OM) in order to provoke and stimulate educators within the discipline.

Design/methodology/approach

The papers within this special issue include empirical assessments of a problem‐based learning enterprise resource planning (ERP) simulation; a computer‐based learning tool for material requirements planning (MRP); a simulation of assembly operations; an operations strategy innovation game; an extension of the production dice game; an experiential teaching method in different class settings; and problem‐based assessment methods in OM. A variety of data are used to support these empirical studies, including survey, interview, and observational data.

Findings

The papers within the special issue support the argument that OM is well‐suited to more applied methods of teaching focusing on the application of subject knowledge to real‐life situations through a variety of techniques.

Practical implications

It is hoped that this review and the papers within this special issue act to stimulate educators to re‐evaluate their approaches to teaching OM and encourage them to consider adopting experiential teaching methods, business simulations, role‐plays, group exercises, live cases, and virtual learning environments, instead of, or in addition to, the more conventional lectures that typically dominate many OM modules around the world.

Originality/value

A special issue on teaching OM appears timely given the significant changes to both the university landscape and to the nature of the discipline that we have witnessed over the last quarter of a century.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 32 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article

M. Nosratollahi, M. Mortazavi, A. Adami and M. Hosseini

The purpose of this paper is the optimal design of a reentry vehicle configuration to minimize the mission cost which is equal to minimize the heat absorbed (thermal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is the optimal design of a reentry vehicle configuration to minimize the mission cost which is equal to minimize the heat absorbed (thermal protection system mass) and structural mass and to maximize the drag coefficient (trajectory errors and minimum final velocity).

Design/methodology/approach

There are two optimization approaches for solving this problem: multiobjective optimization (lead to Pareto optimal solutions); and single‐objective optimization (lead to one optimal solution). Single‐objective genetic algorithms (GA) and multiobjective Genetic Algorithms (MOGA) are employed for optimization. In second approach, if there are n objectives (n+1) GA run is needed to find nearest point (optimum point), which leads to increase the time processing. Thus, a modified GA called single run GA (SRGA) is presented as third approach to avoid increasing design time. It means if there are n objectives, just one GA run is enough.

Findings

Two multi module function – Ackley and bump function – are selected for examination the third approach. Results of MOGA, GA and SRGA are presented which show SRGA approach can find the nearest point in much shorter time with acceptable accuracy.

Originality/value

GA, MOGA and SRGA approaches are applied to multidisciplinary design optimization of a reentry vehicle configuration and results show the efficiency of SRGA in complex design optimization problem.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 82 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article

Peter Joyce

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the 2016 elections for Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) and to compare them with those that took place in 2012. It seeks to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the 2016 elections for Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) and to compare them with those that took place in 2012. It seeks to evaluate the background of the candidates who stood for office in 2016, the policies that they put forward, the results of the contests and the implications of the 2016 experience for future PCC elections.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based around several key themes – the profile of candidates who stood for election, preparations conducted prior to the contests taking place, the election campaign and issues raised during the contests, the results and the profile of elected candidates. The paper is based upon documentary research, making particular use of primary source material.

Findings

The research establishes that affiliation to a political party became the main route for successful candidates in 2016 and that local issues related to low-level criminality will dominate the future policing agenda. It establishes that although turnout was higher than in 2012, it remains low and that further consideration needs to be devoted to initiatives to address this for future PCC election contests.

Research limitations/implications

The research focusses on the 2016 elections and identifies a number of key issues that emerged during the campaign affecting the conduct of the contests which have a bearing on future PCC elections. It treats these elections as a bespoke topic and does not seek to place them within the broader context of the development of the office of PCC.

Practical implications

The research suggests that in order to boost voter participation in future PCC election contests, PCCs need to consider further means to advertise the importance of the role they perform and that the government should play a larger financial role in funding publicity for these elections and consider changing the method of election.

Social implications

The rationale for introducing PCCs was to empower the public in each police force area. However, issues that include the enhanced importance of political affiliation as a criteria for election in 2016 and the social unrepresentative nature of those who stood for election and those who secured election to this office in these contests coupled with shortcomings related to public awareness of both the role of PCCs and the timing of election contests threaten to undermine this objective.

Originality/value

The extensive use of primary source material ensures that the subject matter is original and its interpretation is informed by an academic perspective.

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Article

Roland Burgman and Göran Roos

This paper has two purposes: to identify and explain the major forces that are causing the increasing need for operational reporting and intellectual capital (IC…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper has two purposes: to identify and explain the major forces that are causing the increasing need for operational reporting and intellectual capital (IC) reporting for European companies; and to identify the necessary and sufficient conditions for operational and intellectual capital reporting if such reporting is to be meaningful for information users.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach for this paper has been to examine relevant papers, reports, guidelines, compendiums, annual reports, opinions, submissions and legislation.

Findings

Eight determining forces are identified that make the basis of the case for the provision of operating and IC information: the long‐standing global dominance and growth of the US economy; the emergence of business models other than the value chain (especially the emergence of network businesses); the changing nature of stock exchanges; the influence of different investment fund types (mutual, pension and hedge funds); the roles of buy‐side and sell‐side analysts; global and European investment index development; rating agency activity; and financial reporting and corporate governance regime development.

Practical implications

The eight forces are interdependent and immutable. Comprehensive operational and IC reporting are unavoidable. Accordingly, the authors propose that the necessary and sufficient conditions for adequate enterprise information reporting are: a legal requirement for mandatory operational and IC reporting and attendant regulatory framework(s) where the legal framework is based on the concept of neglect; key operating and IC resource status and activity performance definitions and metrics that reflect the enterprise's underlying business model(s); and (3) a mapping of the capitalized operational and IC investments that are by definition normally expensed to the financial report accounts.

Originality/value

The authors believe that no one has previously formally proposed a mandatory operational and IC reporting requirement; a legal reference frame of reference based on the legal concept of neglect; standard definitions for operational and IC performance metrics; a reference framework for information quality that is, inter alia, based on the consistency, comparability and comprehensiveness of reported metrics; and the requirement to map all capitalized IC resources back to the financial reports of the company.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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