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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Stefan Kwiatkowski and Andrzej K. Koźmiński

Management education in Poland is doing much better than the Polisheconomy. Centres of excellence are slowly being formed, and there aresigns of hope that the whole…

Abstract

Management education in Poland is doing much better than the Polish economy. Centres of excellence are slowly being formed, and there are signs of hope that the whole educational system might act as an important agent of managerial and entrepreneurial change. All existing and stillnewly forming Polish schools of business share some common characteristics: market orientation, use of non‐conventional methods of instruction, reliance on some forms of foreign assistance, a higher level of autonomy than in traditional academic institutions. Indisputable initial success should not be taken, however, as an indication of the maturityof the Polish management education system. The most severe obstacles it encounters are those imposed by a seriously ailing economy. Without a real transformation of the Polish economy a viable system of management education cannot exist, as its efficiency cannot be meaningfully verified.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Joseph L. Tropea

Interrelated conflict and transformation are associated with post World War II U.S. military. Conflicts within the command structure are depicted by military officers in…

Abstract

Interrelated conflict and transformation are associated with post World War II U.S. military. Conflicts within the command structure are depicted by military officers in their writings. Transformation, characterised by military sociologists as a process of “civilianisation,” has informed understanding over the past few decades. However, neither the officer‐writers‘ “close‐up” perspective nor, in retrospect, the sociologists’ sanguine formulations effectively interrelate structural transformation and conflicts in command. In this respect, these literatures suggest relevant analogies: officer‐writers reflect existential crisis not unlike many traditional peoples experiencing consequences of externally induced economic change; sociological characterisations of “civilianisation,” like those of “modernisation,” fail to account for adverse and conflictual consequences of such “development”. Both the “crisis in command” and sociological failures to explicate it may be related to political economy's transformation of the military. That is the argument entailed in this article.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Jerzy Kociatkiewicz and Monika Kostera

The purpose of this paper is to consider three types of stories: media, personal accounts and fiction, and look for plots depicting situations of fundamental shift in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider three types of stories: media, personal accounts and fiction, and look for plots depicting situations of fundamental shift in the framing and basic definitions of reality. The authors examine them from the point of view of their usefulness for developing creative responses to systemic change.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a narrative study in three stages, aimed at identifying strong plots pertaining to systemic change. The analyzed material came from three different sources of narratives (fiction, media and creative stories) and was approached by the use of two different narrative methods: symbolic interpretation and narrative collage.

Findings

Currently many voices are being raised that the authors are living in times of interregnum, a period in between working systems. There is also a mounting critique of the business school as an institution perpetuating dysfunctional ideologies, rather than enhancing critical and creative thinking. The authors propose that the humanities, and, in particular, learning from fiction (and science fiction) can offer a language to talk about major (systemic) change help and support learning about alternative organizational realities.

Research limitations/implications

The study pertains to discourse and narratives, not to material aspects of culture construction.

Practical implications

Today, there is a mounting critique of business schools and their role in society. Following Martin Parker’s call to transform them into schools of organizing, helping to develop and discuss different alternatives instead of reproducing the dominant model, the authors suggest that education should be based, to much larger extent than until now, on the humanities. The authors propose educational programmes including the study of fiction and film.

Social implications

The authors propose that the humanities (and the study of fiction) can equip society with a suitable language to discuss and problematize systemic change.

Originality/value

This paper adds to narrative social studies through providing an analysis of strong plots showing ways of coping with systemic collapse, and through an examination of these plots’ significance for organizational education, learning, and planning. The authors present an argument for the broader use of fiction as a sensemaking, teaching, and learning tool for managing organizations in volatile environments.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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