Search results

1 – 10 of 39
Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2002

Andries De Grip, Jasper Van Loo and Ken Mayhew

Abstract

Details

The Economics of Skills Obsolescence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-960-3

Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2002

Andries De Grip, Jasper Van Loo and Ken Mayhew

Abstract

Details

The Economics of Skills Obsolescence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-960-3

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2020

Ruud Gerards, Andries de Grip and Arnoud Weustink

The purpose of this paper is to provide a first investigation of how new ways of working (NWW) and their various facets relate to employee informal learning at work, while…

1191

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a first investigation of how new ways of working (NWW) and their various facets relate to employee informal learning at work, while accounting for a range of known antecedents of informal learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The job demand–control model and the job demands–resources model underpin our hypotheses on how NWW would relate to informal learning. The hypotheses are tested using the Preacher and Hayes (2008) bootstrap method for mediation analysis, accounting for the potential mediating effect of the frequency with which employees receive feedback.

Findings

The analyses show that NWW positively relate to informal learning at work. This relation is mediated by the frequency with which employees receive feedback. Further analysis shows that one particular NWW facet – access to organizational knowledge – is an independent driver of informal learning, hardly mediated by receiving feedback.

Practical implications

The results suggest that managers who seek new ways to stimulate informal learning can do so by giving their employees more access to organizational knowledge, for instance, by leveraging the potential of modern ICT.

Originality/value

This empirical paper is the first study on the impact of NWW on informal learning at work. Using data on the Dutch working population, it provides novel insights for several strands of literature as well as for practitioners.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2017

Maria Ferreira, Annemarie Künn-Nelen and Andries De Grip

This paper provides more insight into the assumption of human capital theory that the productivity of job-related training is driven by the improvement of workers’ skills…

Abstract

This paper provides more insight into the assumption of human capital theory that the productivity of job-related training is driven by the improvement of workers’ skills. We analyze the extent to which training and informal learning on the job are related to employee skill development and consider the heterogeneity of this relationship with respect to workers’ skill mismatch at job entry. Using data from the 2014 European Skills and Jobs Survey, we find – as assumed by human capital theory – that employees who participated in training or informal learning show greater improvement of their skills than those who did not. The contribution of informal learning to employee skill development appears to be larger than that of training participation. Nevertheless, both forms of learning are shown to be complementary. This complementarity between training and informal learning is related to a significant additional improvement of workers’ skills. The skill development of workers who were initially underskilled for their job seems to benefit the most from both training and informal learning, whereas the skill development of those who were initially overskilled benefits the least. Work-related learning investments in the latter group seem to be more functional in offsetting skill depreciation than in fostering skill accumulation.

Details

Skill Mismatch in Labor Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-377-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Ruud Gerards, Andries de Grip and Claudia Baudewijns

The purpose of this paper is to shed more light on the impact of the various facets of new ways of working (NWW) on employee work engagement, taking into account multiple…

8370

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed more light on the impact of the various facets of new ways of working (NWW) on employee work engagement, taking into account multiple sectors and occupational fields.

Design/methodology/approach

Insights from the literature and the job demands-resources model underpin the hypotheses on how NWW would affect work engagement. The hypotheses were tested using the Preacher and Hayes’ (2008) bootstrap method for multiple mediation and controls, taking into account two potential mediators between (facets of) NWW and work engagement: social interaction in the workplace and transformational leadership.

Findings

The analyses show that three facets of NWW – management of output, access to organizational knowledge, and a freely accessible open workplace – positively affect employees’ work engagement. The latter two facets appear to be fully mediated by social interaction and transformational leadership.

Practical implications

The results imply that firms should foster transformational leadership styles among their line managers, and social interaction in the workplaces, to maximize the positive impact of NWW on work engagement.

Originality/value

This empirical paper draws on a unique data set on the Dutch working population to provide novel insights with a substantial degree of generalizability into the relation between NWW and work engagement, whilst applying a more comprehensive definition of NWW than previously applied, while incorporating two potential mediators.

Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2002

Abstract

Details

The Economics of Skills Obsolescence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-960-3

Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2002

Andries De Grip and Jasper Van Loo

In this chapter we review the economic literature on the various causes of skills obsolescence and the ways in which skills obsolescence has been modelled or estimated…

Abstract

In this chapter we review the economic literature on the various causes of skills obsolescence and the ways in which skills obsolescence has been modelled or estimated. Most of the literature focuses on skills obsolescence due to atrophy and worker displacements. Skills obsolescence may, however, also be due to the wear of skills, technological and organizational developments, shifts in the structure of employment and organizational forgetting. In the second part of the chapter, we discuss measures for skills obsolescence. Skills obsolescence measures are related to both the cause of skills obsolescence and the way in which it manifests itself.

Details

The Economics of Skills Obsolescence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-960-3

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Thomas N. Garavan, John P. Wilson, Christine Cross, Ronan Carbery, Inga Sieben, Andries de Grip, Christer Strandberg, Claire Gubbins, Valerie Shanahan, Carole Hogan, Martin McCracken and Norma Heaton

Utilising data from 18 in‐depth case studies, this study seeks to explore training, development and human resource development (HRD) practices in European call centres. It…

8278

Abstract

Purpose

Utilising data from 18 in‐depth case studies, this study seeks to explore training, development and human resource development (HRD) practices in European call centres. It aims to argue that the complexity and diversity of training, development and HRD practices is best understood by studying the multilayered contexts within which call centres operate. Call centres operate as open systems and training, development and HRD practices are influenced by environmental, strategic, organisational and temporal conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised a range of research methods, including in‐depth interviews with multiple stakeholders, documentary analysis and observation. The study was conducted over a two‐year period.

Findings

The results indicate that normative models of HRD are not particularly valuable and that training, development and HRD in call centres is emergent and highly complex.

Originality/value

This study represents one of the first studies to investigate training and development and HRD practices and systems in European call centres.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Jos Sanders and Andries de Grip

This paper analyses whether low‐skilled workers' training participation and task flexibility contribute to their firm‐internal and firm‐external mobility, and find that…

4758

Abstract

This paper analyses whether low‐skilled workers' training participation and task flexibility contribute to their firm‐internal and firm‐external mobility, and find that both training participation and task flexibility contribute only to firm‐internal employability. However, the workers' participation in training plays a much more explicit role in their firm‐internal career than their task flexibility does, as the former appears to be an important means to increase their opportunities in the firm‐internal labour market. Neither the low‐skilled workers' participation in training nor their task flexibility contributes to their external employability. Task‐flexible, low‐skilled workers are less likely to expect to be externally employable than non‐task flexible workers are. The focus of the low‐skilled workers on their firm‐internal employability can be explained by the fact that such workers usually have more opportunities to improve their position in the firm‐internal labour market than in the external labour market.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Andries de Grip and Wendy Smits

The purpose of this paper is to enrich the discussion on the determinants of training participation and informal learning of scientists and engineers (S&Es).

827

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enrich the discussion on the determinants of training participation and informal learning of scientists and engineers (S&Es).

Design/methodology/approach

Tobit analyses on survey data.

Findings

The authors find that both formal training and informal learning are particularly related to job and firm characteristics instead of labour supply characteristics. S&Es employed in firms that apply innovative production processes more often participate in formal training, and also benefit from the informal learning potential of their jobs. However, lifelong learning is not triggered in firms with many product innovations. S&Es who are employed in firms that operate on highly competitive markets also participate in formal training less often. The same holds for S&Es employed in small firms, although the latter compensate this by more hours of self‐teaching. S&Es employed in jobs that require a high level of technical knowledge more often participate in formal training, whereas those employed in jobs that require more general skills are more involved in informal learning. Furthermore, older S&Es with long firm tenures participate in formal training less often, and have fewer opportunities for learning in their jobs. Therefore, their competence level is at risk.

Practical implications

Public policies that stimulate process innovation also appear to prevent skills obsolescence among S&Es. Public policies that aim to diminish labour market shortages of S&Es by discouraging early retirement should particularly take account of the necessity to keep the human capital of older S&Es with long firm tenures up to date.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature on the determinants of human capital development by including both formal training and different modes of informal learning; and employee characteristics as well as job and firm characteristics in its analyses.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

1 – 10 of 39