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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Ian R. Hodgkinson, Thomas W. Jackson and Andrew A. West

Customer experience is more critical than ever to firms’ successes and future growth opportunities. Typically measured through aggregate satisfaction scores, businesses…

Abstract

Purpose

Customer experience is more critical than ever to firms’ successes and future growth opportunities. Typically measured through aggregate satisfaction scores, businesses have been criticized for oversimplifying what experience means. The purpose of this study is to provide a new perspective on experience management and offers a novel way forward for customer-centric strategizing.

Design/methodology/approach

Mapping the current digital technologies being used across businesses in all sectors to engage and connect with customers more effectively, this paper outlines some of the fundamental challenges of experience management and future opportunities to enhance business practice.

Findings

Businesses are capturing what they know about customers, rather than what a customer thinks and feels about the firm. Many experience management initiatives create customer pains (not gains), while for businesses, decision-making can be jeopardized by fake customer data. A framework based upon the five experience dimensions is presented for optimal customer-driven decision-making.

Practical implications

Going beyond aggregate satisfaction scores that serve as an output rather than an input into businesses strategizing, the paper presents an actionable framework for targeted investments and enhanced experience management practices.

Originality/value

Businesses are seeking to grow intelligent customer experience analysis capabilities to disrupt traditional business models toward greater customer-centricity and to track the digital spread of positive and negative experiences. Examining how this is being done and where the weaknesses lie by bridging management practice and the scientific literature, this paper provides new knowledge to advance customer-centric strategies for growth and profitability.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2017

Andrew West

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Aristotle’s ethics can be applied to the ethics of professional accountants (PAs), in relation to the approach adopted by the…

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2811

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Aristotle’s ethics can be applied to the ethics of professional accountants (PAs), in relation to the approach adopted by the International Federation of Accountants (IFAC), and to consider the reasons that justify the Aristotelian approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines IFAC’s approach and identifies several weaknesses. Three themes of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics are applied to the work of PAs. Reasons why this perspective is more suitable for PAs are then articulated.

Findings

Several aspects of Aristotle’s ethics can be fruitfully applied to the ethics of PAs. These include the relationship between function, goals and the good, an awareness of the human goal to achieve eudaimonia, the development of both excellences of character and of intelligence, and the significance of non-rational aspects of morality, including emotions, will, responsibility and choice.

Research limitations/implications

This perspective provides an alternative conceptualisation of the ethics of PAs. Although it does not provide concrete guidance regarding what the ethical approach to specific situations may be, it presents a useful counterpoint to existing approaches that are largely deontological and utilitarian.

Practical implications

This paper provides accountants in practice with a more comprehensive and adequate perspective on what it means for a PA to be ethical, and raises several issues related to how ethics is included in the education and training of accountants.

Originality/value

Investigating the philosophical basis for professional ethics approaches professional codes of ethics in a way that it is not typically considered. The paper also provides a more comprehensive application of Aristotelian ethics than previous work.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Caroline Shenaz Hossein

Academics examining the global South who engage in informal politics to understand social and political issues should be prepared to diversify their methods toolkit…

Abstract

Purpose

Academics examining the global South who engage in informal politics to understand social and political issues should be prepared to diversify their methods toolkit. Informal ties and politics are where one learns about social and economic exclusion. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed qualitative methods – such as individual interviews, surveys, and focus groups – provide an understanding of the people’s perspective, enabling the researcher to truly know what is going on.

Findings

Fieldwork in the downtown communities of Kingston, Jamaica, has an element of danger because violence and politics are very much a part of the daily reality of the people being interviewed. In this paper, the author argues that studying how financial resources are allocated to low-income people and understanding why some groups purposefully self-exclude themselves from economic development programs require unorthodox field methods. The author thus uses political ethnography to understand the experience of marginalized Jamaican people.

Originality/value

Mixed qualitative methods and political ethnography assisted the author to understand the actual experience of marginalized people and politicized financial programs.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Andrew Tyson and Alicia Wood

Valuing People presents a range of challenges for managers and other stakeholders. Partnership boards are charged with leading the change process. The paper sets out the…

Abstract

Valuing People presents a range of challenges for managers and other stakeholders. Partnership boards are charged with leading the change process. The paper sets out the steps that the West Sussex Board has taken to meet these challenges and describes in particular a ‘framework for frameworks’ that the Board has adopted to produce truly person‐centred and inclusive plans. The paper concludes that stakeholders can be empowered to find their voice where planners commit to an inclusive process.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Susan Hamilton, Richard Wilson and Andrew Butcher

The debate on reorganisation of hospital services is fertile ground for expert opinion. The Joint Consultants Committee (JCC) have produced the most recent view on the…

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566

Abstract

The debate on reorganisation of hospital services is fertile ground for expert opinion. The Joint Consultants Committee (JCC) have produced the most recent view on the ideal acute hospital size and consultant staffing; however, their ideal is far removed from reality. A survey of trusts across the West Midlands found that many are falling short of the recommendations, such as meeting a one‐in‐five consultant on‐call rota for the major admitting specialties and providing adequate cover in the core sub‐specialties of general medicine and general surgery. While the JCC recommendations give a welcome direction and focus to workforce planning, reaching some of these will require a large financial investment and an increase in the number of trainees. Prioritising the recommendations may help to facilitate implementation by health‐care providers.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2007

Alan Barcan

The student revolt of 1967 to 1974, which finally expired about 1978, retains its fascination and much of its significance in the twenty‐first century. But the seven or so…

Abstract

The student revolt of 1967 to 1974, which finally expired about 1978, retains its fascination and much of its significance in the twenty‐first century. But the seven or so years which preceded it are often passed over as simply a precursor, the incubation of a subsequent explosion; they deserve a higher status. The concentration of interest on the late 1960s and early 1970s arises from the driving role of students in the cultural revolution whose traumatic impact still echoes with us. As late as 2005 some commentators saw federal legislation introducing Voluntary Student Unionism as the culmination of struggles in the 1970s when Deputy Prime Minister Costello and Health Minister Abbott battled their radical enemies. Interest in these turbulent years at a popular, non‐academic level has produced a succession of nostalgic reminiscences. In the Sydney Morning Herald’s ‘Good Weekend’ for 13 December 2003 Mark Dapin pondered whether the Melbourne Maoists had changed their world views (‘Living by the Little Red book’.) In the Sydney University Gazette of October 1995 Andrew West asserted that the campus radicals of the 1960s and ‘70s had remained true to their basic beliefs (‘Not finished fighting’.) Some years later, in April 2003, the editor of that journal invited me to discuss ‘Where have all the rebels gone?’ My answer treated this as a twofold question: What has happened to the former rebels? Why have the students of today abandoned radicalism?

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2011

Chong W. Kim, Harlan M. Smith, Andrew Sikula and Lorraine P. Anderson

The purpose of this paper is, first, to summarize six studies which analyze the key characteristics of different types of employees. Three types of employees found in…

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4741

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is, first, to summarize six studies which analyze the key characteristics of different types of employees. Three types of employees found in workplaces all over the world are identified as “Necessities,” “Commoners,” and “Parasites” and, second, to combine the results of these studies in order to identify the key traits and behaviors that characterize each type of worker across a variety of social and cultural settings.

Design/methodology/approach

For starters, three types of employees are defined. First, a person is a Necessity if s/he is irreplaceable and critical to the functioning of an organization. Second, a Commoner is a person of normal ability and talent who has no significant impact on organizational processes. Last, Parasites are detrimental freeloaders who damage the functioning of an organization. To identify the principal characteristics of these three types of workers, a group of researchers led by the first author conducted six studies in which they collected survey data from undergraduate and graduate business students in the USA, India, Korea, Chile, and Japan.

Findings

The authors note the points of commonality and difference across the data sets, and offer their thoughts on future research in the area. The perceptions of what characterizes really good workers (people of Necessity) and very bad workers (Parasites) appear to be the same in all five countries. The picture painted for the Commoner across all data sets, however, is not as clear‐cut.

Originality/value

The study described in this paper helps to explain both similarities and differences in employee characteristics between and among workers in different countries and cultures.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Book part
Publication date: 27 September 1999

Andrew McDonald

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-876-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1978

FRANK EAGLE and ANDREW WEST

The National Ports Council has been developing a concept of progress meetings based on working groups, over a period of ten years. The original ideas were refined from…

Abstract

The National Ports Council has been developing a concept of progress meetings based on working groups, over a period of ten years. The original ideas were refined from experience with a Fred Olsen Lines cargo handling subsidiary in the London Millwall Docks and extended to the local Port Authority as well as a number of other British ports. In Olsens the project began in 1967 when the NPC was called in to assist with problems encountered in operating a new labour agreement. The new mechanised system of loading and unloading ships with palletised cargo handled by fork lift trucks was a complete contrast to traditional methods of handling the Canary fruit trade. In particular the management of the new system put great strains on the cargo superintendents and supervisory group who were coping with the new technology. The approach used was essentially to create an atmosphere of mutual trust and support between individuals and between related levels of management. People were encouraged to discuss: • What their job objectives were and how these related to their concept of overall efficiency for the organisation. • What problems existed and possible means of overcoming them. The role that we played was to listen, to summarise and to help the various levels of management and managed to diagnose the work problems they encountered. As we had no axe to grind we could put a point of view to people and at the same time show them how they might be perceived by others.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Jane Andrew

millennium, n. Period of a thousand years, esp. that of Christ's reign on person on earth (Rev. xx.1–5); (fig.) period of good government, great happiness & prosperity…

Abstract

millennium, n. Period of a thousand years, esp. that of Christ's reign on person on earth (Rev. xx.1–5); (fig.) period of good government, great happiness & prosperity. Hence ∼AL a. [f. L mille thousand + annus year, on anal. Of biennium two years' space] (Oxford Dictionary 1964, p. 768). The Millennium is not a foreign fad. It is a cultural metaphor — admittedly an arbitrary one (Jull 1998, p. 20). (I)mperialism, as we shall see, lingers where it has always been, in a kind of general cultural sphere as well as in specific political, ideological, economic, and social practices (Said 1994, p. 4).

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 11 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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