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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2019

Sajad Fayezi, Andrew O’Loughlin, Ambika Zutshi, Amrik Sohal and Ajay Das

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of behaviour-based and buffer-based management mechanisms on enterprise agility using the lens of the agency theory.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of behaviour-based and buffer-based management mechanisms on enterprise agility using the lens of the agency theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on data collected from 185 manufacturing enterprises using a survey instrument. The authors employ structural equation modelling for data analysis.

Findings

The results of this study show that buffer-based mechanisms used for dealing with agency uncertainty of supplier/buyer not only have a positive impact on agility of enterprises, but are also contingent on the behavioural interventions used in the relationship with a supplier/buyer. Behaviour-based mechanisms also positively impact enterprise agility through mitigating the likelihood of supplier/buyer opportunism.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates that buffer- and behaviour-based management mechanisms can be used as complementary approaches against agency uncertainties for enhancing enterprise agility. Therefore, for enterprises to boost their agility, it is vital that their resources and capabilities are fairly distributed across entities responsible for creating buffers through functional flexibility, as well as individuals and teams dealing with stakeholder engagement, in particular, suppliers and buyers.

Originality/value

The authors use the lens of the agency theory to assimilate and model characteristic agency uncertainties and management mechanisms that enhance enterprise agility.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Elizabeth Shaw, Andrew O'Loughlin and Elspeth McFadzean

To extend the discussion held in part 1, and develop a two‐tier fifth‐generation model of corporate entrepreneurship and innovation.

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7864

Abstract

Purpose

To extend the discussion held in part 1, and develop a two‐tier fifth‐generation model of corporate entrepreneurship and innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The components that have been synthesized from a review of the literature in Part 1 are extended using evidence from the literature. These components are used to construct a two‐tier model of corporate entrepreneurship and innovation; a macro model which presents the high‐level environmental drivers of innovation and a micro model that discusses the contextual factors that underpin the corporate entrepreneurship and innovation process.

Findings

From the analysis conducted in part 1 it is evident that there is a strong relationship between the role of the corporate entrepreneur and the innovation process. It is suggested that by separating the corporate entrepreneur from the innovation process previous models have been overly reductionist in their construction, and their utility has, as a consequence, been severely constrained. The study therefore combines the role and activities of the entrepreneur with the innovation process into a unified framework. In doing so the paper develops a two‐tier fifth‐generation model of corporate entrepreneurship and innovation. The final sections of the paper present the model's implications for management and suggestions for further research.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified gap in the literature, namely the development of a new holistic model of corporate entrepreneurship and innovation, which illustrates the environmental and contextual relationships between the corporate entrepreneur and the innovation process.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Sajad Fayezi, Andrew O'Loughlin and Ambika Zutshi

The paper aims to explain how agency theory can be used to inform our understanding of the dynamics surrounding supply chain behaviours and relationships.

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11159

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explain how agency theory can be used to inform our understanding of the dynamics surrounding supply chain behaviours and relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured review of the literature using a three‐stage refinement process is used. The articles were sourced through online databases and keyword classifications, such as “agency theory”, “principal‐agent relationships” and “supply chain management”. The search initially identified over 86 articles. After further screening these were reduced to 19 for final assessment and comparison.

Findings

Despite agency theory's prevailing descriptive and predictive qualities there is scarcity in its application to the SCM discipline. The authors posit that agency theory provides valuable insights for relationship engineering within supply chains where social, political, legal and behavioural dynamics dominate.

Practical implications

It is a critical task for managers to understand and mitigate abnormal behaviours across the supply chain. Agency theory serves this need by providing them with a useful tool to respond to transaction cost dilemmas through contractual and non‐contractual remedies.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies that examines the current state of agency theory application in the SCM literature and suggests potential avenues for future research.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Sajad Fayezi, Ambika Zutshi and Andrew O’Loughlin

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how decisions regarding organisational flexibility can be improved through targeted resource allocation, by focusing on the supply…

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1464

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how decisions regarding organisational flexibility can be improved through targeted resource allocation, by focusing on the supply chain's level of uncertainty exposure. Specifically, the issue of where and in what ways flexibility has been incorporated across the organisation's supply chain is addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-phase methodology design based on literature review and case study was used. Using 83 journal articles in the areas of uncertainty and flexibility an analytical process for assessing uncertainty-flexibility mismatches was developed. Furthermore, results from ten interviews with senior/middle managers within the Australian manufacturing sector were used to provide preliminary insights on the usefulness and importance of the analytical process and its relationship with organisational practice.

Findings

The paper emphasises the importance of having a systematic and encompassing view of uncertainty-flexibility mismatches across the supply chain, as well as the significance of socio-technical engagement. The paper both conceptually and empirically illustrates how, using a structured analytical process, flexibility requirements across the supply, process, control and demand segments of a supply chain might be assessed. A four-step analytical process was accordingly developed and, its application, usefulness and importance discussed using empirical data.

Practical implications

The analytical process presented in this paper can assist managers to obtain a comprehensive overview of supply chain flexibility when dealing with situations involving uncertainty. This can facilitate and improve their decision-making with respect to prioritising attention on identified flexibility gaps in order to ensure stability of their performance.

Originality/value

The paper presents a supply chain-wide discussion on the difficulties that uncertainty brings to organisations, and how organisational flexibility might serve to moderate those challenges for supply chain management. It discusses how to identify the flexibility gap and proposes an original analytical process for systematic assessment of uncertainty-flexibility mismatches.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Andrew O’Loughlin and Elspeth McFadzean

To date, many of the models and theories that seek to explain problem solving and decision making, have tended to adopt an overly reductionist view of the processes…

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4147

Abstract

To date, many of the models and theories that seek to explain problem solving and decision making, have tended to adopt an overly reductionist view of the processes involved. As a consequence, most theories and models have proved unsuitable in providing managers with a practical explanation of the dynamics that underpin problem solving. A substantial part of a manager’s time is taken up with problem solving and decision making issues. The question of whether managers possess the necessary problem solving skills, or have access to “tools”, which can be used to manage different types of problems, has become an issue of some importance for managers and organisations alike. This paper seeks to contribute to the current literature on problem solving and decision making, by presenting a conceptual model of problem solving, which is intended to assist managers in developing a more holistic framework for managing problem solving issues.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Sajad Fayezi, Ambika Zutshi and Andrew O'Loughlin

The purpose of this paper is to address an important question which centres on investigating how do manufacturing businesses perceive and understand the concepts of…

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2189

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address an important question which centres on investigating how do manufacturing businesses perceive and understand the concepts of agility and flexibility in their supply chains (SCs).

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was utilised and data were gathered from semi-structured interviews with ten organisations in the Australian manufacturing sector. Data analysis was conducted using analytic techniques based on, for example, pattern matching and cross-case synthesis.

Findings

Findings confirmed that there is some ambiguity concerning the understanding of the terms agile and flexible, both within and between organisations. The implications are that there is often little consistency in the way the terms are operationalised and then applied. In this regard, and to inform future research, the paper offers empirically grounded definitions for SC agility and flexibility. Moreover, four propositions are developed and discussed which shed light on the dynamics of agility and flexibility in the SC.

Originality/value

This is one of the first empirical studies to address some of the apparent inconsistencies between organisational applications of agility and flexibility, and their impact on SC operations.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Andrew O’Loughlin

Understanding student’s intentions with regard to entrepreneurship as a possible career pathway is important for the development of the formal economy. Presented here are…

Abstract

Understanding student’s intentions with regard to entrepreneurship as a possible career pathway is important for the development of the formal economy. Presented here are the results from a longitudinal study conducted between 2010 and 2014 involving a sample of 1,513 undergraduate students, of which 54 agreed to be interviewed. The research is qualitative and has combined the Opportunity Structure with the Theory of Planned Behavior to understand the reasons why students chose to start a business either just prior to or within one year of entering university, and their intentions upon graduating. The results show that many of these businesses sit within the informal economy, and may be categorized as low growth businesses with few skill requirements. Importantly, the research has discovered that these students are also highly strategic with regard to educational pathways, and many of these businesses are focused on delivering and/or sustaining a particular lifestyle while at university.

Details

Societal Entrepreneurship and Competitiveness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-471-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Elspeth McFadzean, Andrew O'Loughlin and Elizabeth Shaw

To examine the literature on corporate entrepreneurship and innovation and to develop a combined definition of these two terms. Moreover, the literature is used to…

Downloads
15287

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the literature on corporate entrepreneurship and innovation and to develop a combined definition of these two terms. Moreover, the literature is used to construct a holistic model that seeks to explain the links between corporate entrepreneurial activity and the innovation process.

Design/methodology/approach

A number of published works on entrepreneurship and innovation are critiqued. The findings from this literature review are used to develop a framework illustrating the relationships between the corporate entrepreneur and the innovation process.

Findings

The paper presents a combined definition of corporate entrepreneurship and innovation and, from the literature review, concludes that previous models on entrepreneurship and innovation are fragmented because there is little exploration on the relationships and dynamics between these two factors. A framework of corporate entrepreneurship and innovation is constructed by synthesising the information gathered from previous literature. This model shows that there are missing links between the entrepreneur and the innovation process. The paper discusses three factors that may explain both the dynamics and the relationships between the entrepreneur and the innovation process. These are entrepreneurial attitudes, vision and actions.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified gap in the literature, namely the lack of investigation into the links between the corporate entrepreneur and the innovation process, and suggests three factors that could be used to explain this gap. Part 2 of this paper will present a new holistic model of corporate entrepreneurship and innovation that illustrates the relationships between these two areas in more detail.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Vanessa Ratten and Leo-Paul Dana

This book provides an opportunity to explore the societal effects of entrepreneurship and its result on competitiveness. Over the last decade society has changed as the…

Abstract

This book provides an opportunity to explore the societal effects of entrepreneurship and its result on competitiveness. Over the last decade society has changed as the consequence of demographic shifts and increased usage of information communications technology. This has influenced the type of entrepreneurship individuals and firms to engage in and the focus of their businesses. Despite the importance of society to the speed and rate of entrepreneurship, little research exists that specifically examines societal entrepreneurship and competitiveness. This book aims at narrowing this research gap by discussing the interface between society and entrepreneurship. The core theme emerging from the chapters in this book is that the context of entrepreneurship is dependent on societal perceptions.

Details

Societal Entrepreneurship and Competitiveness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-471-7

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 December 2017

Faïz Gallouj

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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