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Article

Andrew Newton

This paper will reflect on the impact of the Licensing Act 2003 (LA03). It will focus primarily on how the LA03 has been introduced to, and has influenced, the night‐time…

Abstract

This paper will reflect on the impact of the Licensing Act 2003 (LA03). It will focus primarily on how the LA03 has been introduced to, and has influenced, the night‐time economy (NTE). More specifically, it will examine the impact of the LA03 on alcohol‐related crime, disorder and harm to health, within an urban context. It will review the evidence base for the impact of the LA03, suggesting reasons why the UK experience of extended trading hours is not consistent with international evidence. It will examine the mixed findings from evaluations as to its success/failures/limited influence, and discuss its impact on a number of organisations involved in the promotion and safety of the NTE. It will highlight the continued struggles encountered within the NTE, between the promotion of an enjoyable and profitable NTE, and those who have responsibility for maintaining a safe NTE environment. It will also discuss potential extraneous factors that have superseded the LA03, before concluding by offering and discussing some possible avenues for future direction.

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Safer Communities, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article

Andrew D. Newton, Shane D. Johnson and Kate J. Bowers

This paper reports the main findings of an evaluation of an intensive four‐week policing operation along a single bus corridor, aimed at reducing the extent of crime along…

Abstract

This paper reports the main findings of an evaluation of an intensive four‐week policing operation along a single bus corridor, aimed at reducing the extent of crime along the bus route. The evaluation, which adopts a mixture of quantitative evaluation techniques, demonstrates that the operation was successful both in increasing officer arrest rates (up to four times for the officers who worked on the scheme), and also in reducing crime levels for particular crime types, namely assault and theft from vehicle, up to 400m from the route. A conceptual discussion is provided as to how to measure the effectiveness of an operation with no geographically predefined action area and to define the relationship between action areas and displacement or diffusion zones. Consequently, this evaluation examines both the influence of the scheme within a predefined distance from the route, and also proposes a method for determining the likely range of influence of the scheme in terms of physical distance.

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Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Abstract

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Safer Communities, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article

The British Medical Journal observes that there is overwhelming evidence that the digestive disorders to which many young children are subject have resulted from the…

Abstract

The British Medical Journal observes that there is overwhelming evidence that the digestive disorders to which many young children are subject have resulted from the practice of feeding them upon certain foods largely composed of starch. Hitherto no very great effort has been made to prevent these foods being sold, beyond the general advice which is given to mothers and nurses by doctors and health visitors as to the harmfulness of them. Our contemporary points out that the County Council of Rutland have, however, succeeded in obtaining a conviction before the local justices against a druggist for selling an infants' food which was found by the Public Analyst for the County to contain upwards of 70 per cent. of practically unaltered starch, and which was therefore held to be not of the nature, substance, and quality demanded by the purchaser. It appears that the preparation was described as being suitable for an infant only a few days old. A dessertspoonful of the mixture was directed to be put into a basin to be mixed to the thickness of a smooth cream with cold milk or water; to this was to be added half a pint of milk and water in equal parts, and it was then to be brought to the boil. It was contended by the vendor that the boiling would convert the starch into sugar, and this view was supported by a member of the “Society of Public Analysts and other Analytical Chemists.” The British Medical Journal further observes that there are some artificially prepared infants' foods, not containing 70 per cent of starch, in which the conversion of the starch into saccharine bodies may become complete, but considers that it is not very satisfactory that the harmfulness or otherwise of such preparations should be left to the decision of a local bench of magistrates—a course which may well be compared to our disadvantage with that which it is now possible to adopt in Queensland under the provisions of the Health Act of 1911. Section 17 of the Act enables the Health Commissioner to cause to be examined any food which is advertised, for the purpose of ascertaining its composition, properties, or efficiency. He may then report the result of the examination to the Government and publish his report in any newspaper which circulates in the colony. Moreover, the Governor in Council may, on the recommendation of the Health Commissioner, prohibit the advertising or sale of any food which, in the opinion of the Commissioner, is injurious to life or health. Until such an enactment is in force in this country it must be left to other public authorities to follow the example of the Rutland County Council.,

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British Food Journal, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Sue Newton

Discusses the Total Quality culture of Harvester restaurants, concentrating on training to achieve the company′s mission of delivering a high quality service to its…

Abstract

Discusses the Total Quality culture of Harvester restaurants, concentrating on training to achieve the company′s mission of delivering a high quality service to its guests. Outlines the importance of teamwork in the programme, and provides a case study of the executive team, showing how the system works in practice.

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Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Book part

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business…

Abstract

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business activities in which the firms are engaged are outlined to provide background information for the reader.

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Reputation Building, Website Disclosure and the Case of Intellectual Capital
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-506-9

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Article

Alex M. Andrew

The attempt to understand the working of the brain suffers from difficulties of definition, since it is not clear that brains can understand brains, and the nature of…

Abstract

The attempt to understand the working of the brain suffers from difficulties of definition, since it is not clear that brains can understand brains, and the nature of “understanding” is essentially subjective. If it is accepted that our thought processes are products of evolution, the principles of rational discourse and science are reflections of the environment rather than inherent in us. Nevertheless they are strongly ingrained and well‐founded, but since their implications are essentially subjective they cannot be distinguished from other assertions that would be classed as “mystical”.

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Kybernetes, vol. 23 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article

Edmond V. Nicolau

Considers the central nervous system as a data‐processing system, in which one can model (simulate) an operating system, a knowledge processor, a monitor, a model of the…

Abstract

Considers the central nervous system as a data‐processing system, in which one can model (simulate) an operating system, a knowledge processor, a monitor, a model of the Universe and a linguistic model. Artistic creativity is compared with scientific activity and it is stressed that scientific creativity can also mean small advances in given areas. Considers it essential not to propose new paradigms, but to elaborate efficient imaginary ideas, to create new concepts and to propose new areas of research. In these directions, some simple methods are suggested.

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Kybernetes, vol. 23 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article

Vicki A. Hosek and Lara J. Handsfield

The purpose of this study was to examine teacher decisions surrounding opportunities for student voice, experiences and beliefs in digital classroom communities. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine teacher decisions surrounding opportunities for student voice, experiences and beliefs in digital classroom communities. The teachers’ decisions reflect monologic rather than dialogic teacher pedagogies which prompted the authors to ask the following question: What led to these teacher-centered practices in digital environments?

Design/methodology/approach

Authoritative discourses in school policies and a missing connection between critical pedagogies and teachers’ technology practices are examined in light of teachers’ decisions to engage in monologic and/or dialogic teaching practices. The authors propose professional development and research that emphasize pedagogy that supports student voice as foundational to practices involving digital literacies.

Findings

Examination of the teachers’ decisions showed monologic practices void of student opportunities to critically engage in digital environments. Dominant discourses imposed through protectionist and digital citizenship policies of schools as well as lack of opportunity through professional development to connect critical pedagogy to technology impacted the teachers’ decisions.

Originality/value

Current research surrounding teachers’ digital literacies uses the TPACK framework to examine technology integration practices. Missing is a critical component that addresses and works to dismantle the dominant discourses and power structures in digital communities (Author, 2018). The authors build on research in critical digital literacies to argue for adding the critical missing “C” into the TPACK framework (C-TPACK) to move researchers and educators to consider pedagogies that examine ideologies at work in digital communities to provide opportunities for student voice.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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