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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2007

Tolib N. Mirzoev, Andrew T. Green and James N. Newell

The purpose of this paper is to provide an up‐to‐date overview of Tajikistan's health system, focusing on the main factors affecting health systems development. The wider…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an up‐to‐date overview of Tajikistan's health system, focusing on the main factors affecting health systems development. The wider contextual environment is to be explored, focusing on political, social and economic issues. Different elements of the health system including health policy, governance, service delivery, human resources and health financing are reviewed in the light of their development over the past decade.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper shows that the Republic of Tajikistan is in transition. Formerly one of the most neglected republics within the USSR, the country became independent in 1990 and faced the civil conflict shortly thereafter. In the last few years there have been major public sector reforms with health reforms formally launched in the late 1990s. Little information about current Tajikistan is widely available.

Findings

The paper finds that the progress of health reforms in Tajikistan has been relatively slow compared with neighbouring Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. This is largely due to the effects of civil war in the mid‐1990s and significant out‐migration of qualified experts, but it can also be attributed to an inability of central government to adequately adapt to the requirements of transition.

Originality/value

The paper shows that many problems are still to be overcome by the health system, ranging from operational issues related to service delivery to strategic issues such as formulating an explicit privatisation policy, reducing fragmentation of, and aligning, external aid. However, some recent developments, such as adoption of a country health reform conception, a health financing strategy, and willingness of central government to improve coordination, suggest that improvements are possible.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Andrew N. Green and Andrew Jack

A business organization should consistently meet the needs of its stakeholders. Any sub‐optimal position suggests that enhancement of business performance is possible in…

Abstract

A business organization should consistently meet the needs of its stakeholders. Any sub‐optimal position suggests that enhancement of business performance is possible in at least two areas: the effectiveness of the routes to achieving those stakeholder needs, and the efficiency of those routes. The support activities constitute an environment created by the integration and co‐ordination of people, processes and places. The challenge is to create the support environment that consistently meets the needs of the business, and then to manage it through the optimum use of resources. An organization that has created, sustained and managed a business‐aligned support environment is likely to have a competitive advantage over those that have not done so. If the author is able to confirm this assertion through his research, then the desired outcome would be a framework for achieving such alignment. This paper briefly describes the concept of Business Support Optimisation as an approach to improving such alignment at a moment in time, and suggests how it can be operationalised using value mapping to realise stakeholder expectations.

Details

Facilities, vol. 22 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Caroline V. Plane and Andrew N. Green

The purpose of this study is to explore the causal link between procurement route and ongoing buyer‐supplier relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the causal link between procurement route and ongoing buyer‐supplier relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws on literature in the areas of: facilities management (FM) outsourcing; purchasing and supply chain strategy; and collaborative business relationship management. The research methodology is qualitative, and comprised semi‐structured interviews with buyers and suppliers of FM services.

Findings

Findings suggest that in general clients are seeking more collaborative relationships and this may determine a more relational procurement process. Some organisations appear more practiced than others in defining the level of collaboration and business benefits sought. Results support the view that a relational procurement process provides greater clarity of service requirements and facilitates cultural alignment between the buyer and supplier. However, additional time, effort, and cost are incurred, and concerns arise regarding the maturity of the supplier‐market and the sincerity of client intentions to collaborate.

Practical implications

A major practical implication is that facilities managers should recognise the importance of determining relationship objectives and the benefits sought within the context of FM procurement activity and select a purchasing route which supports the achievement of those objectives.

Originality/value

Originality exists in the qualitative approach used to inquire into the causality between relationships and procurement routes. The study offers potential value to both buyers and suppliers of FM services through describing the attributes of a successful collaborative relationship and how they link to a given procurement process, and identifying the potential risks and rewards involved.

Details

Facilities, vol. 30 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2019

Laura Brianna Cole, Jerod Quinn, Aysegul Akturk and Briana Johnson

This study examines a general education, hands-on and 100 per cent online laboratory course to better understand the prospects for fostering green building literacy…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines a general education, hands-on and 100 per cent online laboratory course to better understand the prospects for fostering green building literacy through experiential online education.

Design/methodology/approach

The mixed-methods research design included pre- and post-course surveys (n = 42) together with semi-structured interviews mid-semester (n = 10) and four to six months post-course (n = 5). Data were collected for two semesters.

Findings

Students experienced significant increases in green building knowledge and skills, environmental sensitivity and pro-environmental behaviors from the beginning to the end of the course. Qualitative results indicate that the hands-on laboratory assignments were the primary pedagogical interventions affecting change. Interviews four to six months after the course revealed that motivation, convenience and supportiveness of the context were key factors impacting the pro-environmental behaviors that were maintained versus those that were discontinued by students when the course was over.

Practical implications

This paper shares effective approaches used to deliver an online course with hands-on laboratories that lead to positive increases in sustainability knowledge and behaviors stretching beyond the semester.

Originality/value

While online and experiential learning are both well-studied themes in higher education, very little empirical work examines experiential online learning, and this is particularly the case for online laboratory courses. The work here contributes to the understanding of general education online laboratories that are designed to increase knowledge and behavior change through hands-on experiential learning techniques.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Douglas Warner, John Tzilivakis, Andrew Green and Kathleen Lewis

This paper aims to assess agri-environment (AE) scheme options on cultivated agricultural land in England for their impact on agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess agri-environment (AE) scheme options on cultivated agricultural land in England for their impact on agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It considers both absolute emissions reduction and reduction incorporating yield decrease and potential production displacement. Similarities with Ecological Focus Areas (EFAs) introduced in 2015 as part of the post-2014 Common Agricultural Policy reform, and their potential impact, are considered.

Design/methodology/approach

A life-cycle analysis approach derives GHG emissions for 18 key representative options. Meta-modelling is used to account for spatial environmental variables (annual precipitation, soil type and erosion risk), supplementing the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change methodology.

Findings

Most options achieve an absolute reduction in GHG emissions compared to an existing arable crop baseline but at the expense of removing land from production, risking production displacement. Soil and water protection options designed to reduce soil erosion and nitrate leaching decrease GHG emissions without loss of crop yield. Undersown spring cereals support decreased inputs and emissions per unit of crop yield. The most valuable AE options identified are included in the proposed EFAs, although lower priority is afforded to some.

Practical implications

Recommendations are made where applicable to modify option management prescriptions and to further reduce GHG emissions.

Originality/value

This research is relevant and of value to land managers and policy makers. A dichotomous key summarises AE option prioritisation and supports GHG mitigation on cultivated land in England. The results are also applicable to other European countries.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Brandon Randolph-Seng, John Humphreys, Milorad Novicevic, Kendra Ingram and Foster Roberts

Scholars have begun calling for broader conceptualisations of moral disengagement processes that reflect the interaction of dispositional and situational antecedents to a

Abstract

Scholars have begun calling for broader conceptualisations of moral disengagement processes that reflect the interaction of dispositional and situational antecedents to a predilection to morally disengage. The authors argue that collective leadership may be one such contingent antecedent. While researching leaders from the Gilded Age of American business history, the authors encountered a compelling historical case that facilitates theory elaboration within these intersecting domains. Interpreting evidence from the embittered leader dyad of Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick, the authors show how leader egoism can permeate moral identity to promote symbolic moral self-regard and moral licensing, which augment a propensity to morally disengage. The authors use insights developed from our analysis to illustrate a process conceptualisation that reflects a dispositional and situational interaction as a precursor to moral disengagement and explains how collective leadership can function as a moral disengagement trigger/tool to reduce cognitive dissonance and support the cognitive, behavioural, and rhetorical processes utilised to justify unethical behaviour.

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Andrew Ebekozien, Matthew Ikuabe, Andrew Igiebor Awo-Osagie, Clinton Aigbavboa and Solomon Oisasoje Ayo-Odifiri

Several studies have shown that climate change is a threat to sustainable human living and high consumption of energy by buildings is a contributory factor. However, green

Abstract

Purpose

Several studies have shown that climate change is a threat to sustainable human living and high consumption of energy by buildings is a contributory factor. However, green practices in buildings have been proved as one of the successful technologies to mitigate global warming. Previous studies have shown lax green practices in developing countries’ buildings, but how far concerning green certification of buildings in Nigeria is yet to be explored. Therefore, this paper investigated the barriers to green certification of buildings (GCB). Also, the paper proposed a model for promoting GCB in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Eighteen experts with green building certification knowledge were engaged across three of Nigeria’s cities (Benin City, Abuja and Lagos) via scheduled WhatsApp video and teams calls. Collated interview data were analysed and presented in themes.

Findings

Findings show that there is an absence of a framework to promote GCB in Nigeria. Hence, GCB is low across the states. Twelve main sub-themes emerged as the barriers to GCB in Nigeria. Also, eight key sub-themes emerged as the possible concepts that can be used to improve GCB in Nigeria and formulated into a proposed framework to promote GCB in Nigeria.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to GCB in Nigeria and only 18 participants were engaged. Thus, this paper suggests that a mixed-methods approach should be conducted in future studies with wider coverage. This may assist to validate the paper’s findings.

Practical implications

Findings from this paper will stir up practitioners in green building and influence the promotion of GCB in the sector. As part of this study’s implications, suggestions through the paper’s proposed framework will benefit Nigeria’s policymakers to make decisions towards achieving GCB. This can be achieved via the proposed framework to promote the concept across Nigeria.

Originality/value

This paper is probably the first that attempted to investigate the barriers and proffer policy solutions via a framework to promote GCB in Nigeria and by extension in other developing countries.

Details

Property Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Nina C. Cooper, Deepa Balachandran Nair, Sile Egan, Andrew Barrie and Bhathika Perera

Intellectual disability (ID) is prevalent in 1 per cent of the population. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) affects up to 5 per cent of the general population of adult women…

Abstract

Purpose

Intellectual disability (ID) is prevalent in 1 per cent of the population. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) affects up to 5 per cent of the general population of adult women. Identification of PMS is challenging in women with ID due to differences in communication. Management of PMS in the ID population requires careful consideration of baseline function, co-existing mental and physical health problems, drug interactions as well as complex ethical considerations. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Prospero-registered systematic review (CRD42019119398) of papers exploring the diagnosis and management of patients with PMS and ID (n=414). In total, 35 relevant titles were identified and 27 full text papers were assessed for eligibility, resulting in 10 studies for final qualitative analysis.

Findings

Ten original research papers were included. There are no standardised symptom criteria for diagnosis of PMS in women with ID. Studies relied on observer-reported data. All papers demonstrated higher rates of PMS in women with ID compared with the general adult population. Management was not standardised and varied between centres. Mainstays of treatment included non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, combined oral contraceptive pills and intramuscular progesterone. Newer evidence suggests levonorgestrel intrauterine systems may be appropriate. There was no quantitative method of establishing success of management.

Practical implications

A modified symptom diary should be used for diagnosis in this population. Differentiation between cyclical behavioural change due to pain vs mood disturbance remains challenging. Conservative, psychological and medical management should be the mainstay of treatment, with surgery considered in exceptional cases.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates the current limited evidence for the management of PMS in women with a diagnosis of ID and offers an overview of the current options for managing these patients’ symptoms.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2021

Andrew Ebekozien, Solomon Oisasoje Ayo-Odifiri, Angeline Ngozika Chibuike Nwaole, Aginah Lawrence Ibeabuchi and Felix Ebholo Uwadia

The high consumption of energy by buildings may have enhanced land degradation, flooding, air pollution and many other hazardous environmental issues. However, green

Abstract

Purpose

The high consumption of energy by buildings may have enhanced land degradation, flooding, air pollution and many other hazardous environmental issues. However, green practices in buildings have been proved as one of the successful technologies to mitigate these issues. Past studies have shown lax green practices in Nigerian buildings. Concerning public hospital buildings, this is yet to be explored. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the barriers to green practices and proffer possible policy solutions to promote hospital green buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

In attaining these objectives, the view of hospital building contractors, design team, hospital management and policymakers in the relevant ministries/agencies was engaged via virtual interviews. The collated data were analysed and presented in the thematic pattern.

Findings

Findings show that green building construction is extremely low in Nigeria, but the worst hit is the health-care buildings across the states. Government/policy-related, organisational/leadership-related, financial-related, technical-related, design team-related and stakeholders’ behaviour-related barriers emerged as the main six themes of barriers affecting public hospital green buildings implementation initiatives. Findings show that proffering possible policies to addressing these barriers may improve public hospital green construction across the states.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to barriers to green buildings implementation in public hospitals in Nigeria, and data collection was through virtual interviews but does not affect the strength of the findings. Thus, this paper suggests that the sub-themes and variables/items that emerged from the collated data as presented in Figure 1 can be further developed quantitatively via questionnaire survey to validate and improve the reliability of results from this paper.

Practical implications

As part of this study’s implications, suggestions from this paper will stir up policymakers’ decisions, to be tailored towards achieving green buildings implementation initiatives in Nigerian public hospitals.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is probably the first that attempted to investigate the barriers to green buildings implementation in public hospitals in Nigeria.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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