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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/03090599210008437. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/03090599210008437. When citing the article, please cite: Andrew Myers, Mairi Bryce, Andrew Kakabadse, (1992), “Business Success and 1992: The Need for Effective Top Teams”, Journal of European Industrial Training, Vol. 16 Iss: 2.

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Management Decision, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Andrew Myers, Mairi Bryce and Andrew Kakabadse

That competitiveness in the single European market is recognized bysome companies as a challenge providing opportunities, that it is seenby others to be a threat, has been…

Abstract

That competitiveness in the single European market is recognized by some companies as a challenge providing opportunities, that it is seen by others to be a threat, has been the message communicated in numerous publications. Contributes further knowledge by identifying the various active pursuits of companies in making their visions of successfully competing in Europe a reality, and by highlighting the requirements for a company to become successful post‐1992. Successful management is required to establish a long‐term strategic intent for Europe in order to be competitive and for a company to be a “winner” post‐1992. The “winners” so far are the companies which have pan‐European organizational infrastructure, and can manage manufacturing, brands and distribution, on a European‐wide basis.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Sensor Review, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Terry Lockhart and Andrew Myers

States that there has been much debate about the EC’s SocialCharter but very little research on the implications for personnelmanagers. Personnel managers will be…

Abstract

States that there has been much debate about the EC’s Social Charter but very little research on the implications for personnel managers. Personnel managers will be responsible for implementing the majority of Social Charter initiatives within their organizations. Based on the results from a postal survey of over 5,000 personnel managers across ten European countries, highlights the impact of the Social Charter on their organizations. Results show that: personnel managers are not as solely positive towards the Social Charter as expected; there appears to be a great deal of uncertainty among managers from a number of European countries – there is no pan‐European perspective at present – and; the perception that the UK is “dragging its feet” seems to be a misconception.

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Personnel Review, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Andrew Myers, Andrew Kakabadse and Colin Gordon

Bases its findings on the results of a survey of 168 top levelmanagers in French organizations. Demographic variables, behaviouralcharacteristics and measures of business…

Abstract

Bases its findings on the results of a survey of 168 top level managers in French organizations. Demographic variables, behavioural characteristics and measures of business impact have been linked in order to discover whether organizational infrastructure concerns, educational achievements of top management, or the behaviour of top management, or a combination of these, influence the business performance of French private sector organizations. The results show that the level of qualification attained does not indicate whether French senior managers will perform effectively, nor is the configuration of organization structure significant for effective management. Crucial, however, are the attitudes and behaviour of senior managers, who are identified as significantly impacting on group and organizational performance. Considers that four areas of management development are pertinent to the continued growth and development of French senior managers, namely enhancing the ability to respond positively to feedback, enhancing interfacing skills, effective use of consultants and assisting managers to be high achievers.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1995

Andrew Kakabadse, J. Timothy McMaho and Andrew Myers

Presents a study of correlates of divergent vision within, andsensitivity to internal issues by, top management teams across aneight‐country sample of 2,514 top managers…

Abstract

Presents a study of correlates of divergent vision within, and sensitivity to internal issues by, top management teams across an eight‐country sample of 2,514 top managers. The outcome reveals their importance as well as remarkable similarities. Findings relate, among others, to organizational issues ignored, business consequences, and satisfaction. These highlight the “culture‐free” importance of both the internal and external roles of top management.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Andrew Kakabadse, Andrew Myers and Lola Okazaki‐Ward

Japan’s advance into Europe over the last ten years or so has been well documented. Through localization, gaining a competitive advantage has been the strategic response…

Abstract

Japan’s advance into Europe over the last ten years or so has been well documented. Through localization, gaining a competitive advantage has been the strategic response of Japanese organizations towards Europeanization. Reports on a survey of some 3,350 executives operating within Europe and Japan. Elicits three types of Japanese management style and describes these as: the policy makers; the business drivers; and the implementors. Analyses and compares with the European responses, the responses from these three groups. Discusses the implications of these management styles for international management. Also considers training and development implications for Japanese secondees which centre on: effective communication; developing quality relationships; problem solving at local level; and preparation for the selected secondee.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Andrew Kakabadse and Andrew Myers

A European‐wide survey of 957 top managers of manufacturingcompanies spread across eight countries identifies considerabledifferences on five key dimensions: job…

Abstract

A European‐wide survey of 957 top managers of manufacturing companies spread across eight countries identifies considerable differences on five key dimensions: job satisfaction, orientation to discipline, general management orientation, team orientation and organizational orientation. Further identifies that French, Australian, Finnish and Irish manufacturers report the greatest number of concerns requiring attention. British, German and Swedish manufacturers report the least number of concerns needing improvement. Particular management and organizational development initiatives are identified as vehicles for improvement. Attention is paid as to which developmental approaches are better suited to meet the needs of manufacturers from particular countries.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1998

Andrew Korac‐Kakabadse, Nada Korac‐Kakabadse and Andrew Myers

Leadership philosophy is explored through gender and other demographic characteristics in the Australian Public Service (APS), at the federal government level. Leadership…

Abstract

Leadership philosophy is explored through gender and other demographic characteristics in the Australian Public Service (APS), at the federal government level. Leadership philosophy is conceptualised as the leader’s attitudes, values and behaviour. Gender differences in characteristics of leaders (executives and middle managers) are examined in terms of strategic behaviour, management style, work‐related values, adoption of information technology, perceived organisational morale, family/work conflict and personal, work and family satisfaction. The gender differences are investigated using questionnaire responses from a sample of 750 respondents, of which 569 were male and 145 female. The APS findings are compared with a Cranfield study conducted in the UK’s National Health Service (NHS), where gender differences are explored in terms of management and strategic orientation. A sample of 515 chief executives, medical, clinical, HR and financial directors, chairpersons and other non‐executive directors, consists of 406 male and 108 female respondents. The APS study reveals that there are no significant gender differences in the majority of measured characteristics. Similarly in the NHS Trusts study, no significant gender differences are found in terms of management and strategic orientation. The conclusion reached is that other demographic characteristics are influential in forming leadership philosophies, namely job and organisational tenure and experience of senior management responsibilities, thus highlighting the importance of organisational demographics and their impact on leadership attitudes and practice.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Collin Randlesome and Andrew Myers

The importance of being fluent in another language for success inforeign business has been well documented and highlighted in academicliterature. However, so has being…

Abstract

The importance of being fluent in another language for success in foreign business has been well documented and highlighted in academic literature. However, so has being fluent in another culture, as far back as the 1950s. What is the current response of organizations operating in the UK to such exigencies? Presents the results of a survey, based on responses from 35 members of the Association of Language Excellence Centres (ALECS) in the UK from both the private and public sector and assesses the level of language and cultural fluency. Indicates that the percentage of British companies carrying out an internal foreign language audit in order to attain fluency in another country′s language is disturbingly low. In addition, those wishing to become culturally fluent are even lower. Concludes by stating that a number of business opportunities are being overlooked, not just for companies but also for training organizations.

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