Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2020

Andrew Martin, Geoff Watson, Jan Neuman, Ivana Turčová and Lucie Kalkusová

The purpose of this paper is to examine Czech traditions of outdoor games and sports, turistika activities and education in nature programmes, which have continued to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine Czech traditions of outdoor games and sports, turistika activities and education in nature programmes, which have continued to develop during periods of oppression and provided opportunities to preserve the Czech culture.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the historical, cultural and political context of education in nature traditions in Czech was proposed.

Findings

Late 19th century organisations such as the Turistický klub and Sokol were instrumental in developing a range of indigenous turistika activities involving active movement. The early 20th century influences were the Czech scouting movement, summer camps and Woodcraft. Charles University provided the first tertiary outdoor educational programmes in Prague in the 1950s. Their foundation course “Turistika and Outdoor Sports” is still compulsory for all students studying physical education and sport. Turistika activities and outdoor sports and games continued to be developed throughout the liberalization of the socialist regime in the 1960s.

Practical implications

Following the Prague Spring in 1968, and under the guise of the Socialist Youth Union organization, new experimental forms of outdoor education emerged.

Social implications

Since the Velvet Revolution in 1989 organisations have reconnected with Czech outdoor traditions that flourished before 1948 and other organisations have developed education in nature programs. The commercial sphere, which did not exist before 1989, has now been established in the outdoor area. However, traditional participation in turistika activities has been impacted by other external motivations as a broader range of opportunities have become available and accepted, and tourism outside of Czech and Europe has become increasingly popular and accessible.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper is to provide an overview of Czech political and cultural history and how it has shaped people's relationship, particularly children and youth, with the outdoors.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Martin Andrew Green

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Downloads
148

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

This research paper demonstrates that learning through tensions is a catalyst for learning and proposes framework tools for managing cross-organizational projects to an efficient and more culturally aligned conclusion.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Martin Andrew Green

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Downloads
226

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

This research paper explores the impact on work performance that an employee’s goal orientation type has. Intrinsically, goal-orientated employees perform well across the board, but having both intrinsic and extrinsic goals simultaneously turbocharges an employee’s work performance.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives’ and researchers’ hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Rebecca J. Collie, Helena Granziera and Andrew J. Martin

The aim of this study was to examine the extent to which several workplace factors are implicated in school principals' well-being. Two job resources (i.e. participatory…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to examine the extent to which several workplace factors are implicated in school principals' well-being. Two job resources (i.e. participatory climate and collegial climate) and two job demands (i.e. barriers to professional learning and staff shortages) were investigated, along with two well-being outcomes (i.e. job satisfaction and occupational commitment). Interaction effects between the job resource and job demand variables were also tested.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were from 5,951 principals in 22 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries that participated in the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) 2013. Path analysis of direct and interaction effects was tested, along with multigroup path analysis to determine any differences in results across nations.

Findings

The results showed that staff shortages and collegial climate predicted job satisfaction. All of the job resources and demands predicted occupational commitment. In addition, one interaction effect was significant showing that a participatory climate was especially important for occupational commitment under conditions of high staff shortages. The findings were similar across the 22 countries.

Originality/value

The study yields important knowledge about the cross-national salience of four job resources and demands that are associated with principals' well-being at work.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 58 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2018

Ashleigh-Jane Thompson, Andrew J. Martin, Sarah Gee and Andrea N. Geurin

As the popularity of social media increases, sports brands must develop specific strategies to use them to enhance fan loyalty and build brand equity. The purpose of this…

Downloads
5264

Abstract

Purpose

As the popularity of social media increases, sports brands must develop specific strategies to use them to enhance fan loyalty and build brand equity. The purpose of this paper is to explore how two social media platforms were utilised by the Grand Slam tennis events to achieve branding and relationship marketing goals.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analytic design was employed to examine Twitter and Facebook posts from the official accounts during, and post-, each respective event.

Findings

Both sites were utilised to cultivate long-term relationships with fans and develop brand loyalty, rather than to undertake short-term marketing activations. However, these sites appear to serve a different purpose, and therefore unique strategies are required to leverage opportunities afforded by each. Interestingly, brand associations were utilised more frequently during the post-event time period.

Practical implications

This study offers practitioners with useful insight on branding and relationship-building strategies across two social platforms. These results suggest that strategies appear dependent on the event, timeframe and specific platform. Moreover, the events’ differences in post use and focus may also indicate some differences related to event branding in an international context. Furthermore, sport organisations should look to leverage creative strategies to overcome limitations that platform-specific functionality may impose.

Originality/value

This study offers unique insights brand-building efforts in an international event setting, which differ in a range of contextual factors that impact on social media utilisation.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Andrew Martin Cox, Pamela McKinney and Paula Goodale

The purpose of this paper is to explore the meaning of information literacy (IL) in food logging, the activity of recording food intake and monitoring weight and other…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the meaning of information literacy (IL) in food logging, the activity of recording food intake and monitoring weight and other health conditions that may be affected by diet, using applications (apps) accessed through mobile devices and personal computers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from a small group of food logging app users through a focus group and interviews. Analysis was informed by practice theory and the growing interest in IL outside educational settings.

Findings

Food logging revolves around the epistemic modality of information, but it is the user who creates information and it is not textual. Food logging is associated with a discourse of focussing on data and downplaying the corporeal information associated with eating and its effect on the body. Social information was an important source for choosing an app, but data were rarely shared with others. Food loggers are very concerned with data quality at the point of data entry. They have a strong sense of learning about healthy eating. They were not well informed about the data privacy and access issues.

Practical implications

Food loggers need to be better informed about data risks around food logging.

Originality/value

This is the first study of food logging from an IL perspective.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Andrew Martin Cox, Stephen Pinfield and Sophie Rutter

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise the issues of alignment for changing academic libraries by using and extending McKinsey’s 7S model.

Downloads
3358

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise the issues of alignment for changing academic libraries by using and extending McKinsey’s 7S model.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical work was conducted to consider and extend the 7S model for the situation of academic libraries. Empirical data were then used to confirm the value of these extensions and suggest further changes. The data to support the analysis were drawn from 33 interviews with librarians, library and non-library academics and experts, and a survey of UK library staff.

Findings

In the academic library context, the 7S model can be usefully extended to include three library functions (stuff, space and services) and users. It can also include institutional influences and stakeholders, and aspects of the external environment or situation, including suppliers and allies. The revised model then provides a useful framework within which data about library change can be analysed. Perceived barriers to successful performance fit the model and enable the identification of seven challenges of alignment.

Research limitations/implications

The resulting model has potential applications such as in the structuring analysis of academic library performance, mapping future directions of development and for exploring variations across the sector and internationally.

Practical implications

The revised model can be used by practitioners to think through their own strategic position and to act to shape their future, in the light of seven major areas of alignment.

Originality/value

The paper extends a well-known model used in strategy, to produce a more comprehensive, sector-specific analytic tool.

Details

Library Management, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Andrew Martin Cox and Winnie Wan Ting Tam

Visualisations of research and research-related activities including research data management (RDM) as a lifecycle have proliferated in the last decade. The purpose of…

Downloads
1761

Abstract

Purpose

Visualisations of research and research-related activities including research data management (RDM) as a lifecycle have proliferated in the last decade. The purpose of this paper is to offer a systematic analysis and critique of such models.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework for analysis synthesised from the literature presented and applied to nine examples.

Findings

The strengths of the lifecycle representation are to clarify stages in research and to capture key features of project-based research. Nevertheless, their weakness is that they typically mask various aspects of the complexity of research, constructing it as highly purposive, serial, uni-directional and occurring in a somewhat closed system. Other types of models such as spiral of knowledge creation or the data journey reveal other stories about research. It is suggested that we need to develop other metaphors and visualisations around research.

Research limitations/implications

The paper explores the strengths and weaknesses of the popular lifecycle model for research and RDM, and also considers alternative ways of representing them.

Practical implications

Librarians use lifecycle models to explain service offerings to users so the analysis will help them identify clearly the best type of representation for particular cases. The critique offered by the paper also reveals that because researchers do not necessarily identify with a lifecycle representation, alternative ways of representing research need to be developed.

Originality/value

The paper offers a systematic analysis of visualisations of research and RDM current in the Library and Information Studies literature revealing the strengths and weaknesses of the lifecycle metaphor.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 70 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2013

Andrew J. Martin, Paul Ginns, Brad Papworth and Harry Nejad

Aboriginal students experience disproportionate academic disadvantage at school. It may be that a capacity to effectively deal with academic setback and challenge…

Abstract

Purpose

Aboriginal students experience disproportionate academic disadvantage at school. It may be that a capacity to effectively deal with academic setback and challenge (academic buoyancy) can reduce the incidence of academic adversity. To the extent that this is the case, academic buoyancy may also be associated with positive educational intentions. This study explores the role of academic buoyancy in Aboriginal students’ post-school educational intentions.

Methodology/approach

The survey-based study comprises Aboriginal (N = 350) and non-Aboriginal (N = 592) high school students in Australia.

Findings

Academic buoyancy yielded larger effect sizes for Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal students’ educational intentions – particularly in senior high school when educational intentions are most likely to translate into post-school educational behaviour.

Social and practical implications

Post-school education is one pathway providing access to social opportunity. Any thorough consideration of students’ passage into and through post-school education must first consider the bases of students’ academic plans and, by implication, their decision to pursue further study. Identifying factors such as academic buoyancy in this process provides some specific direction for practice and policy aimed at optimizing Aboriginal students’ academic and non-academic development.

Originality/value of chapter

Academic buoyancy is a recently proposed construct in the psycho-educational literature and has not been investigated among Aboriginal student populations. Its role in relation to post-school educational intentions is also a novel empirical contribution for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students alike.

Details

Seeding Success in Indigenous Australian Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-686-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Martin Farncombe and Andrew Waller

Outsourcing is a mechanism which has transformed the delivery of facilities management, logistics, IT and other services to today's corporations. This paper looks at the…

Downloads
1183

Abstract

Outsourcing is a mechanism which has transformed the delivery of facilities management, logistics, IT and other services to today's corporations. This paper looks at the reasons behind the rise and rise of outsourcing and its applicability to Real Estate services and concludes that much remains to be done, both by customers and suppliers, before the market will work efficiently. In particular, poor processes, inadequate measurement and inappropriate reward structures need to be addressed. However, there have been some successful case studies in Real Estate, and the market is sure to grow. Triggers for outsourcing are discussed, and lessons are drawn from more mature outsourcing markets (IT, logistics etc) that should help those contemplating Real Estate outsourcing to overcome most of the major risks.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000