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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2021

Andrew Martel, Kirsten Day, Mary Ann Jackson and Saumya Kaushik

The COVID-19 pandemic has engendered changes in previously unimaginable timeframes, leading to new ways of working, which can quickly become the “ordinary” way of working…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has engendered changes in previously unimaginable timeframes, leading to new ways of working, which can quickly become the “ordinary” way of working. Many traditional workplace and educational practices and environments, however, are disadvantageous to people with disability and consequently are under-represented in the workforce and higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

Contributing factors include exclusionary societal and employer attitudes and inaccessible built environments including lack of attention to paths of travel, amenities, acoustics, lighting and temperature. Social exclusion resulting from lack of access to meaningful work is also problematic. COVID-19 has accelerated the incidence of working and studying from home, but the home environment of many people with disability may not be suitable in terms of space, privacy, technology access and connection to the wider community.

Findings

However, remote and flexible working arrangements may hold opportunities for enhancing work participation of people with disabilities. Instigating systemic conditions that will empower people with disability to take full advantage of ordinary working trajectories is key. As the current global experiment in modified work and study practices has shown, structural, organisational and design norms need to change. The future of work and study is almost certainly more work and study from home. An expanded understanding of people with disabilities lived experience of the built environment encompassing opportunities for work, study and socialisation from home and the neighbourhood would more closely align with the UNCRPD's emphasis on full citizenship.

Originality/value

This paper examines what is currently missing in the development of a distributed work and study place continuum that includes traditional workplaces and campuses, local neighbourhood hubs and homes.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

Thomas B. Hickey and Andrew M. Calabrese

OCLC has developed a CD‐ROM‐based system for the storage, distribution, and retrieval of documents. The system stores an ASCII copy of the text of the original document…

Abstract

OCLC has developed a CD‐ROM‐based system for the storage, distribution, and retrieval of documents. The system stores an ASCII copy of the text of the original document. It also stores page make‐up and font definition codes. These codes are used to control an inexpensive laser printer in the production of copies that closely resemble the original document. The authors discuss trends in the information equipment and printing industries that will govern the future application of this technology.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Adrian William Coxell, Danielle Hett and Rachel Chapman

The purpose of this paper is to describe the lack of literature and research on command hallucinations (CHs) in D/deaf persons and make suggestions for assessment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the lack of literature and research on command hallucinations (CHs) in D/deaf persons and make suggestions for assessment, instrument development and research into CHs in D/deaf persons. This is important since it is known that hallucinations are more common in persons with hearing impairment and because CHs are known to be associated not only with distress, but also suicide and homicide.

Design/methodology/approach

Articles on hallucinations and CHs in D/deaf persons are discussed in the context of existing literature on CHs in hearing persons.

Findings

When compared with the literature on hearing persons it is clear that very little is known about the prevalence of CHs in D/deaf persons and that there is a significant lack of research into emotional and behavioural responses to CHs in D/deaf persons. There is no knowledge about the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for D/deaf persons who experience CHs. This is important since a CBT approach has been found to reduce risky compliance.

Practical implications

This paper makes recommendations for informed and evidence-based assessments of CHs in D/deaf persons; such assessments may have an important role in reducing risk and distress.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to review and consider CHs in D/deaf persons as a distinct clinical phenomenon. This paper makes recommendations for the assessment of D/deaf persons who experience CHs.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2014

This chapter is about the modern (Western) educational regime, educational industry paradigm and schooling process, while focussing on statutorily imposed and legally…

Abstract

This chapter is about the modern (Western) educational regime, educational industry paradigm and schooling process, while focussing on statutorily imposed and legally enforced schooling as the main aspect of the hidden curriculum within a globalizing world.

It is about children's productive labour through schooling, whereby children's labour power is consumed, produced and reproduced on behalf of social formations under the capitalist mode of production (CMP).

The claim that a well-educated population is essential for development so that all societies share an interest in having children participate in schooling as much as possible is the central element of the Western education industry paradigm, the global appeal of which is reflected in how compulsory schooling has been embraced almost everywhere in conjunction with being heavily promoted within the ‘international community’ and widely endorsed by researchers, scholars and similar observers.

Contrary to Bowles and Gintis's correspondence principle, the structure of schooling is not an identical to the structure of the workplace in that it entails compulsion, whereby schooling is as efficient and effective as possible in meeting the needs of the CMP.

The CMP benefits from the state having shifted confinement as a mechanism to force people to work onto schooling; or, from compulsory social enclosure, whereby schools increasingly resemble military and prison systems.

Compulsory social enclosure helps to ensure that children's productive capacity – or labour power – is enhanced to the benefit of the CMP, this being the major factor in accounting for its appeal and advance on the world stage, globally.

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Jonathan Hunter and Andrew Cox

The purpose of this paper is to offer an exploratory investigation of students' use of informal learning spaces for their studies at the University of Sheffield. Previous…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer an exploratory investigation of students' use of informal learning spaces for their studies at the University of Sheffield. Previous research has mainly focused on formal learning spaces such as libraries and lecture theatres, but there is an increasing recognition of the value of informal learning spaces such as coffee bars.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires, observations and interviews were the sources of data for the study. The research approach particularly looked at how students used informal learning spaces and what their perceptions of the spaces were.

Findings

Analysis showed that students found that the background atmosphere greatly influenced their choice of study location and that technological devices were only used sparingly. Students adapted their study habits to fit the learning spaces that they liked.

Originality/value

Although, attention is often paid to the furniture and colour schemes in libraries, this article makes librarians consider the importance of all sensual stimuli in making libraries warm, friendly and homely spaces. The “Model of Zengagement” was developed to show how stimuli from the background atmosphere influences' students' study experience.

Details

New Library World, vol. 115 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

John F. Sacco and Gerard R. Busheé

This paper analyzes the impact of economic downturns on the revenue and expense sides of city financing for the period 2003 to 2009 using a convenience sample of the…

Abstract

This paper analyzes the impact of economic downturns on the revenue and expense sides of city financing for the period 2003 to 2009 using a convenience sample of the audited end of year financial reports for thirty midsized US cities. The analysis focuses on whether and how quickly and how extensively revenue and spending directions from past years are altered by recessions. A seven year series of Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) data serves to explore whether citiesʼ revenues and spending, especially the traditional property tax and core functions such as public safety and infrastructure withstood the brief 2001 and the persistent 2007 recessions? The findings point to consumption (spending) over stability (revenue minus expense) for the recession of 2007, particularly in 2008 and 2009.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-618-2

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Abstract

Details

Hybrid Media Events
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-852-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Frank Mueller and Chris Carter

This paper aims to present a detailed examination of the relationship and debate between realist understandings of HRM, on the one hand, and discourse‐based notions of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a detailed examination of the relationship and debate between realist understandings of HRM, on the one hand, and discourse‐based notions of HRM, on the other. The objective is to provide a basis for a possible debate between these, seemingly contradictory, perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper argues that these perspectives can be integrated if one adopts a perspective that overcomes this dualism by thinking of HRM as a “project” where speech acts and non‐linguistic forms of action are seen as interdependent. The paper uses interview extracts in order to illustrate how the HRM Project gets constituted but also resisted in the context of a post‐privatisation electricity company.

Findings

This paper is predicated on the notion that the discourse of HRM is closely intertwined with the shift in power relations between employers, managers, employees and trade unions from the early 1980s onwards. In order to capture the broader context of the discourse it is suggested that the notion of an “HRM Project” includes not only language but also practices, boundary‐spanning linkages, and external agents such as regulators and financial institutions.

Originality/value

Builds on the notion of discourse as a strategic resource.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2007

Alex Frino, Jennifer Kruk and Andrew Lepone

This chapter examines the price impact of large trades in futures markets across 14 stock index futures contracts in 11 different international markets. On the balance, we…

Abstract

This chapter examines the price impact of large trades in futures markets across 14 stock index futures contracts in 11 different international markets. On the balance, we find that part of the initial price effect of futures trades is temporary. These initial price effects are partially reversed, implying that they incur a liquidity premium; though there is some variation in this finding across markets. We also find strong evidence that large buyer- and seller-initiated trades have positive and negative permanent effects on prices, implying they convey information. We conclude, similar to research based on equities markets, that traders in futures markets are informed.

Details

Asia-Pacific Financial Markets: Integration, Innovation and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1471-3

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