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Publication date: 10 April 2019

Santina Bertone and Sanjeev Abeynayake

(1) Critically analyze the role of diversity and inclusion practitioners and the legal/policy framework for managing diversity and inclusion in Australia. (2) Propose…

Abstract

Aims

(1) Critically analyze the role of diversity and inclusion practitioners and the legal/policy framework for managing diversity and inclusion in Australia. (2) Propose enhanced framework to improve outcomes for disadvantaged groups in the workforce.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Review of international and Australian literature, overview of gains and continuing gaps for disadvantaged groups, and consideration of the features of work health and safety (Robens-style) legislation that could be adapted to the diversity and inclusion jurisdiction.

Findings

The role of diversity and inclusion practitioner is often transient and fragmented, offering a limited base to advance the diversity and inclusion cause. Based on indicators, much more work is required to achieve full diversity and inclusion. A stronger legislative/policy framework is needed to increase the effectiveness and longevity of the diversity and inclusion practitioner role, spread responsibility, and achieve improved outcomes.

Research Limitations

A lack of qualitative data from workplaces to augment our understanding of the challenges encountered by diversity and inclusion practitioners. To date, there has been no opportunity to test the feasibility of Robens-style legislation/policy in this area.

Practical Implications

Opportunity to develop a fully worked proposal for legislative/policy reform to present to the government, employers, professional associations, trade unions, and representatives of disadvantaged groups.

Social Implications

Reforms could have far-reaching implications for the regulation and administration of diversity and inclusion practice in Australia

Originality

Critical review of the diversity and inclusion practitioner role and associated legislation/policy in Australia and consideration of an alternative framework for diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Mona Nikidehaghani and Corinne Cortese

The purpose of this paper is to critique the Australian Government's JobKeeper scheme and demonstrate how accounting rationalities were intertwined with the process of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critique the Australian Government's JobKeeper scheme and demonstrate how accounting rationalities were intertwined with the process of governing the nation during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a Foucauldian perspective, the authors make use of public discourse to draw attention to the centrality of accounting and quantitative techniques that were used to support government interventions during the pandemic.

Findings

The authors show that accounting numbers, techniques and quantitative information were mobilised by the government as a way of formulating and implementing the JobKeeper scheme, a program designed to minimise the economic impacts of COVID-19.

Originality/value

The authors demonstrate the centrality of accounting concepts as a rhetorical device and their use by government in times of crisis.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Andrew Leigh and Michael Maynard

Describes an approach to maximizing team performance which integratestraditional business methods with those of the performing arts. Definesthe ACE team as aligned…

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314

Abstract

Describes an approach to maximizing team performance which integrates traditional business methods with those of the performing arts. Defines the ACE team as aligned, creative and exploring, and explains how the ACE Team Star Profile can be used to create a visual profile of a team′s strengths and development needs.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Andrew Leigh

The purpose of this paper is to examine what is meant by integrity and attempts to translate the concept into specific behaviors that can be taught and learned.

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1959

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine what is meant by integrity and attempts to translate the concept into specific behaviors that can be taught and learned.

Design/methodology/approach

Highlights the topicality of integrity and shows why it is likely to become increasingly important in organizations.

Findings

Presents four basic leadership‐integrity behaviors – moral purpose, lawful and ethical, consistency and standing for something. Highlights the importance of discerning what is right and wrong, acting on what one has discerned, even at personal cost, and saying openly that one is acting on what one understands to be right or wrong.

Practical implications

Advances commercial arguments for developers to espouse and promote integrity and the importance of learning about it in their organizations. Shows that integrity underpins an organization's ultimate profitability and competitiveness, as well as increasing employees' pride, engagement with their jobs and customer loyalty. Claims that integrity has also been revealed to enhance company brand or reputation, improve efficiency, attract staff, conserve and sustain resources and mitigate business risk.

Originality/value

Emphasizes that, in communicating the need to focus on integrity and offering ways to help leaders to develop their performance in this area, it makes sense to focus on what is productive for both the individual and the organization.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Change and the information‐technology (IT) industry are now almost synonymous. From Moore’s law, which predicts that computing power doubles every 18 months, to mega…

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1635

Abstract

Change and the information‐technology (IT) industry are now almost synonymous. From Moore’s law, which predicts that computing power doubles every 18 months, to mega mergers such as the coming together of Compaq and HP, the IT industry is always on the move. Hewlett Packard’s evolution from humble beginnings in a Silicon Valley garage, though, has been among the most dramatic. The founders’ ethos – the relentless pursuit of inventive decision making in an entrepreneurial and innovative environment – was relatively simple.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

It is hard to picture the scene – a manager in a major manufacturing company with a background in chemical engineering, standing on stage in a tuxedo reading Nelson…

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953

Abstract

It is hard to picture the scene – a manager in a major manufacturing company with a background in chemical engineering, standing on stage in a tuxedo reading Nelson Mandela’s inaugural speech. But 29‐year‐old John Petre, process and packaging‐development manager for soup, with responsibility for all of Batchelors’, Oxo and Campbell’s UK processing and packaging needs, was not the only one that day to let his hair down in pursuit of better leadership skills.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

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41

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

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327

Abstract

Details

Work Study, vol. 51 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Om P. Kharbanda and Ernest A. Stallworthy

The concept of company culture is now playingan ever‐increasing role in the continuing endeavourto work towards ever better companymanagement, particularly in the…

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2554

Abstract

The concept of company culture is now playing an ever‐increasing role in the continuing endeavour to work towards ever better company management, particularly in the industrial field. This monograph reviews the history and development of both national and company cultures, and then goes on to demonstrate the significance of a culture to proper company management. Well‐managed companies will have both a “quality culture” and a “safety culture” as well as a cultural history. However, it has to be recognised that the company culture is subject to change, and effecting this can be very difficult. Of the many national cultures, that of Japan is considered to be the most effective, as is demonstrated by the present dominance of Japan on the industrial scene. Many industrialised nations now seek to emulate the Japanese style of management, but it is not possible to copy or acquire Japan′s cultural heritage. The text is illustrated by a large number of practical examples from real life, illustrating the way in which the company culture works and can be used by management to improve company performance.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 91 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Jamie D. Collins, Dan Li and Purva Kansal

This study focuses on home country institutions as sources of variation in the level of foreign investment into India. Our findings support the idea that institutional…

Abstract

This study focuses on home country institutions as sources of variation in the level of foreign investment into India. Our findings support the idea that institutional voids found in India are less of a deterrent to investments from home countries with high levels of institutional development than from home countries with similar institutional voids. Overall, foreign investments in India are found to be significantly related to the strength of institutions within home countries. The levels of both approved and realized foreign direct investment (FDI) are strongly influenced by economic factors and home country regulative institutions, and weakly influenced by home country cognitive institutions. When considered separately, the cognitive institutions and regulative institutions within a given home country each significantly influence the level of approved/realized FDI into India. However, when considered jointly, only the strength of regulative institutions is predictive of FDI inflows.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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