Search results

1 – 10 of 301
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1996

Andrew Hutchinson

Proposes that environmental degradation and pollution pose threats to health in a multitude of forms; and that hazardous effects will continue to emanate from industrial…

Abstract

Proposes that environmental degradation and pollution pose threats to health in a multitude of forms; and that hazardous effects will continue to emanate from industrial processes so long as commercial viability dictates the necessity to deposit hazardous wastes in the air, soil and water. Shows how recent research into small and medium‐sized enterprises’ approaches to environmental concerns illustrates the limitations of national and European Union voluntary codes of practice. Following from this research, outlines the case for bioregional regeneration modelling in which the concept of place assumes a central role in industrial decision making.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 July 2010

Abstract

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Robert L. Braun, Dann G. Fisher, Amy Hageman, Shawn Mauldin and Michael K. Shaub

Given the conflicting attitudes that people have toward those who report wrongdoing and a lack of empirical research specifically examining subsequent hiring, it is an…

Abstract

Given the conflicting attitudes that people have toward those who report wrongdoing and a lack of empirical research specifically examining subsequent hiring, it is an open question as to whether accounting professionals would want to work with former whistleblowers. The authors examine this question using an experimental design, in which participants evaluate an employment candidate before and after the person discloses having been a whistleblower. Four manipulations of whistleblowing are used in both a within-subjects and a between-subjects manipulation. The authors’ results demonstrate that accounting professionals’ intentions to recommend a candidate for hire decrease after they are informed that a strong candidate has a whistleblowing past. A candidate is viewed most negatively, however, when discovering malfeasance and electing not to blow the whistle internally. Moreover, when the whistle is blown internally and the superior takes no action, the candidate who remained silent and chose not to continue to push the issue is viewed more negatively than the candidate who proceeded to blow the whistle externally. Although a candidate having a whistleblowing past appears to pose a cautionary signal in the interview process, participants reacted more harshly when the candidate failed to act or lacked the durable moral courage to see the matter through to completion.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-758-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 October 2019

John Blenkinsopp, Nick Snowden, Russell Mannion, Martin Powell, Huw Davies, Ross Millar and Jean McHale

The purpose of this paper is to review existing research on whistleblowing in healthcare in order to develop an evidence base for policy and research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review existing research on whistleblowing in healthcare in order to develop an evidence base for policy and research.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative review, based on systematic literature protocols developed within the management field.

Findings

The authors identify valuable insights on the factors that influence healthcare whistleblowing, and how organizations respond, but also substantial gaps in the coverage of the literature, which is overly focused on nursing, has been largely carried out in the UK and Australia, and concentrates on the earlier stages of the whistleblowing process.

Research limitations/implications

The review identifies gaps in the literature on whistleblowing in healthcare, but also draws attention to an unhelpful lack of connection with the much larger mainstream literature on whistleblowing.

Practical implications

Despite the limitations to the existing literature important implications for practice can be identified, including enhancing employees’ sense of security and providing ethics training.

Originality/value

This paper provides a platform for future research on whistleblowing in healthcare, at a time when policymakers are increasingly aware of its role in ensuring patient safety and care quality.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

It is noted that new British and Europeanlegislation will make it a criminal offence forcompanies not to dispose of their waste productsproperly. Organisations, following…

Abstract

It is noted that new British and European legislation will make it a criminal offence for companies not to dispose of their waste products properly. Organisations, following the American example, will have to monitor the costs of waste disposal just as closely as they audit those of their products. Insurance companies are likely to be more specific in their underwriting of pollution disasters in the light of the swingeing payments doled out in the past. They will now demand the highest level of physical risk management, prevention rather than cure, involving total management commitment, the existence of which could have obviated the demise of companies in the past. Penalties for corporate pollution of the environment will be most severe and negligent directors will be singled out for punishment.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 91 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Bridget Penhale and Margaret Flynn

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2021

Jennifer Morton, Russell Sacks, Jenny Ding Jordan, Steven Blau, P. Sean Kelly, Taylor Pugliese, Andrew Lewis and Caitlin Hutchinson Maddox

This article provides a resource for traders and other market participants by providing an overview of certain automatic circuit breaker mechanisms and discretionary…

Abstract

Purpose

This article provides a resource for traders and other market participants by providing an overview of certain automatic circuit breaker mechanisms and discretionary powers that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) and the U.S. president, as applicable, can exercise to pause or stop the trading of individual securities or trading activities across exchanges during extreme market volatility, each of which can cause interruptions to trading activity.

Design/methodology/approach

This article surveys automatic and discretionary mechanisms to halt trading activity under extreme market conditions. In particular, the article examines automatic cross-market circuit breakers, limit up-limit down pauses, the alternative uptick rule, as well as discretionary authority to stop short selling of particular securities and to stop trading across exchanges.

Findings

The article concludes that market participants must be cognizant not only of automatic cross-market circuit breakers, but also several other forms of potential market disruptions that may occur due to increased market volatility during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

Originality/value

By exploring various mechanisms that respond to market disruption, this article provides a valuable resource for traders and other market participants looking to identify and respond to potential interruptions to their trading activity.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Maria Vincenza Ciasullo, Silvia Cosimato and Rocco Palumbo

In line with the current literature, the purpose of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of whistleblowing procedures and their influence on overall…

Abstract

Purpose

In line with the current literature, the purpose of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of whistleblowing procedures and their influence on overall organisational quality. To this end, institutional, organisational, and cultural barriers to whistleblowing implementation have been investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative analysis based on three explorative case studies investigates and compares different whistleblowing practices implemented in health care organisations, operating within the Italian National Health Service (INHS).

Findings

INHS organisations have implemented whistleblowing procedures in different ways, despite the fact that the procedures are laid down by law. These differences are mainly due to cultural, administrative, organisational, and process barriers, which have a deep impact on whistleblowing integration in managerial practices and their influence on the overall quality of health processes and services.

Research limitations/implications

This research paper was limited by the analysis of three Italian public health care organisations, which did not allow the generalisability of findings. Therefore, the study offers interesting insights on the way effective whistleblowing systems should be implemented in order to support managers to improve organisation’s management and service quality.

Originality/value

The paper represents one of the first attempts to structurally analyse the practice of whistleblowing in an Italian healthcare system. Therefore the study has mainly focussed not only on the analysis of whistleblowing practices, but also on their impacts on the improvement of organisational processes’ quality and, subsequently, on social well-being.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Helen Spandler and Mick McKeown

The purpose of this paper is to explore the case for a truth and reconciliation (T&R) process in the context of mental health services.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the case for a truth and reconciliation (T&R) process in the context of mental health services.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is a conceptual review of T&R approaches; a consideration of why they are important; and how they might be applied in the context of mental health services and psychiatry. First, the paper sets out a case for T&R in psychiatry, giving some recent examples of how this might work in practice. Then it outlines potential objections which complicate any simplistic adoption of T&R in this context.

Findings

In the absence of an officially sanctioned T&R process a grassroots reparative initiative in mental health services may be an innovative bottom-up approach to transitional justice. This would bring together service users, survivors and refusers of services, with staff who work/ed in them, to begin the work of healing the hurtful effects of experiences in the system.

Originality/value

This is the first paper in a peer-reviewed journal to explore the case for T&R in mental health services. The authors describe an innovative T&R process as an important transitional step towards accomplishing reparation and justice by acknowledging the breadth and depth of service user and survivor grievances. This may be a precondition for effective alliances between workers and service users/survivors. As a result, new forms of dialogic communication and horizontal democracy might emerge that could sustain future alliances and prefigure the social relations necessary for more humane mental health services.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Mark Hutchinson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the interaction between a liminal rural Australian city (Lithgow) and the development of higher education options across the city's…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the interaction between a liminal rural Australian city (Lithgow) and the development of higher education options across the city's history. The paper proposes a nuanced interaction between national, social, religious, political, regional and local forces to explain why an industrial city such as Lithgow, with obvious educational strengths, would be overlooked while others (such as Wollongong and Bathurst) were not.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a longitudinal study of educational institutions, placed in their historical contexts, in order to demonstrate the fluctuation of educational vision with the rise and fall of socio-economic contributors to the town's fortunes.

Findings

The paper finds that the city's formation and dependence on war-related industries created boom-bust cycles which negatively impacted on its entrepreneurial, managerial and working class elites, and so on its ability to bring cultural and political influence to bear in the formation of local higher education options, across a period in which higher education becomes an increasingly federal responsibility.

Practical implications

The paper suggests policy ramifications for the support of higher education options in the city.

Social implications

The paper supports the interpretation that it is not merely that education itself promotes social mobility, but that what type of education is important, along with an eye to how education contributes to the overall well-being and cross-class profile of the city of Lithgow.

Originality/value

This paper fills a gap in historical knowledge about Lithgow's educational institutions, the study of which heretofore has tended to be located with either labor historical or heritage approaches. This paper takes a socio-cultural and longitudinal/holistic approach which brings together a variety of approaches previously not treated.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

1 – 10 of 301