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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Anisha Sukha, Elizabeth Li, Tim Sykes, Anthony Fox, Andrew Schofield and Andrew Houghton

When a patient unexpectedly has to go back to the operating theatre, there is often a perceived problem with the primary operation. An IRT30 is defined as any patient…

Abstract

Purpose

When a patient unexpectedly has to go back to the operating theatre, there is often a perceived problem with the primary operation. An IRT30 is defined as any patient returning to the operating theatre within 30 days of the index procedure. IRT30 has been suggested to be a useful quality indicator of surgical standards and surgeon performance. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the usefulness of this validated tool, by assessing all IRT30 over a 12-month period. Learning points for individual surgeons, surgical subspecialty units and the clinical governance leads were reviewed.

Design/methodology/approach

Consecutive series of general and vascular surgical patients undergoing elective and emergency procedures between July 2012 and 2013. Prospective data collection of all IRT30s classified as Types 1-5 by a single-rater and in-depth discussion of Types 3-5 cases at the clinical governance meetings. The individual case learning points were recorded and the collective data monitored monthly.

Findings

There were 134 IRT30s. In total 84 cases were discussed: Type 3 (n=80), Type 4 (n=4) and Type 5 (n=0). In total 50 cases were not discussed: Type 1 (n=27), Type 2 (n=23).

Originality/value

It is crucial that surgeons continue to learn throughout their surgical career by reflecting on their own and their colleague’s results, complications and surgical performance. Analysing Types 3 and 4 IRT30s within the governance meetings has identified learning points related to both surgical technique and surgical decision making. By embracing these learning points, surgical technique and individual as well as group surgeon performance can be modified and opportunities for training and focused supervision created.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2019

John H. Humphreys, Mario Joseph Hayek, Milorad M. Novicevic, Stephanie Haden and Jared Pickens

The purpose of this paper is to proffer a reconstructed theoretic model of entrepreneurial generatively that accounts for personal and social identities in the narrative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to proffer a reconstructed theoretic model of entrepreneurial generatively that accounts for personal and social identities in the narrative construction of entrepreneurial identity..

Design/methodology/approach

The authors followed general analytically structured history processes using the life of Andrew Carnegie to understand how generativity scripts aid in aligning personal and social identities in the formation of entrepreneurial identity.

Findings

The authors argue that Carnegie used entrepreneurial generativity as a form of redemptive identity capital during the narrative reconstruction of his entrepreneurial identity.

Originality/value

This paper extends Harvey et al.’s (2011) model of entrepreneurial philanthropy motivation by including forms of self-capital (psychological capital and self-identity capital) as part of the co-construction of entrepreneurial identity and proposing a reconstructed capital theoretic model of entrepreneurial generativity.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Fiona Thomas

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Koraljka Golub, Marianne Lykke and Douglas Tudhope

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential of applying the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) as an established knowledge organization system (KOS) for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential of applying the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) as an established knowledge organization system (KOS) for enhancing social tagging, with the ultimate purpose of improving subject indexing and information retrieval.

Design/methodology/approach

Over 11,000 Intute metadata records in politics were used. Totally, 28 politics students were each given four tasks, in which a total of 60 resources were tagged in two different configurations, one with uncontrolled social tags only and another with uncontrolled social tags as well as suggestions from a controlled vocabulary. The controlled vocabulary was DDC comprising also mappings from the Library of Congress Subject Headings.

Findings

The results demonstrate the importance of controlled vocabulary suggestions for indexing and retrieval: to help produce ideas of which tags to use, to make it easier to find focus for the tagging, to ensure consistency and to increase the number of access points in retrieval. The value and usefulness of the suggestions proved to be dependent on the quality of the suggestions, both as to conceptual relevance to the user and as to appropriateness of the terminology.

Originality/value

No research has investigated the enhancement of social tagging with suggestions from the DDC, an established KOS, in a user trial, comparing social tagging only and social tagging enhanced with the suggestions. This paper is a final reflection on all aspects of the study.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 70 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

David Denkenberger, Joshua Pearce, Andrew Ray Taylor and Ryan Black

The purpose of this study is to estimate the price and life-saving potential of alternate foods. The sun could be blocked by asteroid impact, supervolcanic eruption or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to estimate the price and life-saving potential of alternate foods. The sun could be blocked by asteroid impact, supervolcanic eruption or nuclear winter caused by burning of cities during a nuclear war. The primary problem in these scenarios is loss of food production. Previous work has shown that alternate foods not dependent on sunlight, such as bacteria grown on natural gas and cellulose turned into sugar enzymatically, could feed everyone in these catastrophes, and preparation for these foods would save lives in a manner that is highly cost-effective.

Design/methodology/approach

This study estimates the price of alternate foods during a catastrophe in line with global trade and information sharing, but factors such as migration, loans, aid or conflict are not taken into consideration.

Findings

Without alternate foods, for a five-year winter, only approximately 10 per cent of the population would survive. The price of dry food would rise to approximately $100/kg, and the expenditure on this food would be approximately $100tn. If alternate foods were $8/kg, the surviving global population increases to approximately 70 per cent, saving >4billion lives.

Research limitations/implications

A nongovernmental mechanism for coordinating the investments of rich people may be possible. Identifying companies whose interests align with alternate food preparations may save lives at a negative cost.

Practical implications

The probability of loss of civilization and its impact on future generations would be lower in this scenario, and the total expenditure on food would be halved.

Originality/value

Preparation for alternate foods is a good investment even for wealthy people who would survive without alternate foods.

Details

foresight, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Andrew Gray, Sarah Pearce and Linda Marks

In the context of the transfer of the responsibility for prison health from the Prison Service to the National Health Service, a survey of doctors working in prisons…

Abstract

In the context of the transfer of the responsibility for prison health from the Prison Service to the National Health Service, a survey of doctors working in prisons reveals doctors’ own high priorities for training in the distinct patient contexts found in prison as well as in certain clinical conditions. The analysis identifies exclusive competences required only for doctors working in prisons and special interest competences that although applicable to practice in the community are particular strengths of doctors working in prisons because of the prevalence of conditions they are required to address.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1912

WHILE there is no doubt that the system of issuing books at “net” prices is of great benefit to booksellers, there is also no doubt that, unless care is taken, it is a…

Abstract

WHILE there is no doubt that the system of issuing books at “net” prices is of great benefit to booksellers, there is also no doubt that, unless care is taken, it is a serious drain upon a limited book‐purchasing income. A few years ago the position had become so serious that conferences were held with a view to securing the exemption of Public Libraries from the “net” price. The attempt, as was perhaps to be expected, failed. Since that time, the system has been growing until, at the present time, practically every non‐fictional book worth buying is issued at a “net price.”

Details

New Library World, vol. 14 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Jeffrey Berman

Abstract

Details

Mad Muse: The Mental Illness Memoir in a Writer's Life and Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-810-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Janet Klaas

Birding, the active seeking out and identification of birds, is a wide‐spread and fast growing avocation on this continent, and indeed throughout the world. Jon Rickert's…

Abstract

Birding, the active seeking out and identification of birds, is a wide‐spread and fast growing avocation on this continent, and indeed throughout the world. Jon Rickert's A Guide to North American Bird Clubs lists 17 national/continental organizations for both professional ornithologists and amateur birders and 844 state, provincial, and local associations. In addition, there are those legions of “unorganized” bird watchers and occasional, inquisitive discoverers of backyard birds. Members of this diverse congregation of birders have at least one thing in common — the need for a reliable identification tool enabling them to correctly label the just‐seen, unfamiliar bird. A field guide is just such a tool.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Steven G. Rogelberg, Logan Justice, Phillip W. Braddy, Samantha C. Paustian‐Underdahl, Eric Heggestad, Linda Shanock, Benjamin E. Baran, Tammy Beck, Shawn Long, Ashley Andrew, David G. Altman and John W. Fleenor

The theoretical and practical criticality of self‐talk for leader success receives extensive multidisciplinary discussion, without a great deal of empirical research given…

Abstract

Purpose

The theoretical and practical criticality of self‐talk for leader success receives extensive multidisciplinary discussion, without a great deal of empirical research given the challenge of assessing actual self‐talk. The purpose of this paper is to advance research and theory on self‐leadership by examining leader self‐talk and its relationship to effectiveness and strain.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 189 senior executives' self‐addressed, future‐oriented letters were collected. The executives wrote these letters to themselves for their own personal development; thus, the language used represented a form of naturally occurring self‐talk. Two types of self‐talk were coded: constructive and dysfunctional. Supervisor and direct report ratings of leadership of others and creativity and self‐ratings of job strain were collected.

Findings

Extensive variability among leaders in constructive self‐talk was found. Exemplars of constructive and dysfunctional self‐talk are presented. Constructive self‐talk positively related to effective leadership of others and creativity/originality as evaluated by subordinates and superiors and was negatively related to job strain. Dysfunctional self‐talk related negatively to creativity/originality.

Originality/value

In addition to illustrating the types of self‐talk used by leaders, research is extended by providing some of the first empirical evidence of how leaders' free‐flowing thoughts are related to their effectiveness and their overall well‐being, lending direct support to a principal proposition from the self‐leadership framework.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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