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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Andrew Harding, Jonathan Parker, Sarah Hean and Ann Hemingway

The purpose of this paper is to provide a supply-side review of policies and practices that impact on the shortage of supply in the contemporary specialist housing market…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a supply-side review of policies and practices that impact on the shortage of supply in the contemporary specialist housing market for older people in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The review is based on a review of academic literature, policy documents, reports and other sources.

Findings

There is a critical conflict between the key social purpose of specialist housing (i.e. living independent of socially provided care) and the values that underpin and ultimately limit the quantity of units in both the social and private sector. In the social sector, government policies prohibit rather than encourage local authorities and housing associations from increasing specialist housing stock. The nature of leasehold tenures in the private sector tends to commodify not only housing stock but also those who use it and therefore acts to instrumentalise housing supply in favour of the profit motive and the focus on the person and her or his needs is largely ignored.

Originality/value

While the shortage of specialist housing is well known, this paper is unique in that it provides a comprehensive and critical supply-side review of the factors that have created such conditions.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Andrew James Harding

This paper aims to explore the concept and spread of the five-foot way (5FW) as an aspect of urban design peculiar to Southeast Asia. It locates the 5FW as an aspect of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the concept and spread of the five-foot way (5FW) as an aspect of urban design peculiar to Southeast Asia. It locates the 5FW as an aspect of planning law and property law that has been adapted culturally to provide a unique space for public–private interaction. The paper also explores, in a related context, conflicts over the appropriate use of 5FWs and the issue of regulating such use.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach adopted is to look at the development of the 5FW over the entire colonial period of Singapore, starting in 1819 up to the present day. Comparisons are drawn from other urban settlements over a similar period.

Findings

The paper finds that the 5FW, with its related device of the shophouse, provided a uniquely efficacious space for protection of the public from the elements and for public–private interaction. It finds that regulation of 5FWs should be undertaken with due regard both to public right of way and to the cultural element of making private use of the space.

Originality/value

The originality of the article lies in the fact that the 5FW has not been considered as an artefact of legal culture in addition to being an artefact of urban design.

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Stephen J. Mckinney and Roger Edwards

The history of the Episcopal Training Institution is an under researched area of teacher education in Scotland. The College was opened in Edinburgh in 1850 and initially…

Abstract

The history of the Episcopal Training Institution is an under researched area of teacher education in Scotland. The College was opened in Edinburgh in 1850 and initially trained male students. After 1867, the male students transferred to Durham and the College trained female students. The students were trained to teach in the Episcopal schools throughout Scotland. These schools were predominantly established for the children of the Episcopal denomination or they were mission schools that educated the poor. The College struggled to recruit sufficient numbers of students in the early twentieth century and the College closed in 1934. A very small number of Episcopal schools still exist in the twenty-first century Scotland.

Details

Teacher Preparation in Scotland
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-480-4

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Julie Adshead, Emma Lees and Francis Sheridan King

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257

Abstract

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

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64

Abstract

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1940

In 1912 Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins reopened the whole question, and investigated again the effects on animals of a synthetic diet. Again he demonstrated the importance…

Abstract

In 1912 Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins reopened the whole question, and investigated again the effects on animals of a synthetic diet. Again he demonstrated the importance of the addition of milk, and in addition he pointed out the importance of the proteins and that some were capable of maintaining life whilst others were inadequate so that animals failed to grow when fed on them. Through this work he systematised previous work and also added an important contribution to our knowledge of nutrition by his discovery of the essential amino acids. These have been extensively studied in recent years, and the following are now regarded as being essential, according to a table by William C. Rose:—

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

John Pitts

The purpose of this paper is to consider what the author might call the evolution of the evolutionary argument about gangs and, while acknowledging its explanatory power…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider what the author might call the evolution of the evolutionary argument about gangs and, while acknowledging its explanatory power, suggests that gangs may develop in very different ways depending on the available opportunities, pre-existing forms of criminality in the areas in which gangs emerge and global change.

Design/methodology/approach

It is based on a review of the relevant literature and interviews with purposive samples of research, criminal justice and social welfare professionals and young people involved in or affected by gang crime. Findings were triangulated with data held by the police and other public authorities.

Findings

The term “street gang” includes a wide variety of groupings all of which are involved in some form of crime but with differential levels of organisation and commitment to purely instrumental goals. Gangs may form but not necessarily evolve. Gangs appear to develop in very different ways depending on the available opportunities, pre-existing forms of criminality in the areas in which they emerge and global changes in drugs markets.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper consists in its interrogation of the concept of “gang evolution” and its discussion of the variety of forms and evolutionary trajectories of gangs.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Abstract

Details

Documents from the History of Economic Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1423-2

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Richard Hanage, Jonathan M Scott and Mark A.P. Davies

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how digital creative graduates develop new businesses on graduating from university, and how their creative, business and…

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1043

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how digital creative graduates develop new businesses on graduating from university, and how their creative, business and personal lives interact until their nascent ventures fail financially.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven digital creative nascent graduate entrepreneurs were followed for up to five years. Although independently assessed as having promise of business success, they were young and lacked business experience. They were followed through six-monthly semi-structured interviews which investigated their business, creative and personal development. The interviews were transcribed and key statements manually coded and extracted for analysis to identify issues, tipping points and outcomes.

Findings

The primary contribution is the finding that, despite a promising beginning and very generous start-up support, all seven nascent ventures failed financially and most were closed down in favour of employment, particularly when personal issues such as parenthood sharpened the need for stable levels of income. The graduates demonstrated weaknesses in their commercial skills, especially selling (human capital) and insufficient utilization of networks (social capital) so that in the mainly mature low entry-barrier markets they were entering they were at a disadvantage from the outset. The research has also demonstrated the value of a real-time longitudinal qualitative approach to investigating businesses from business start-up to eventual exit.

Practical implications

The insights gained have practical implications for start-up and survival support for creative graduate businesses, as well as raising issues about the effectiveness of postgraduate entrepreneurship education and cultural policy relating to this economically important sub-sector.

Originality/value

The longitudinal approach has brought new insights and indicates several areas where more research would be valuable, especially in dealing with the consequences of unsuccessful nascent business ventures.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Andrew Munthopa Lipunga, Betchani M.H. Tchereni and Rhoda Cythia Bakuwa

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of governance reforms also called conceptual innovation for public hospitals in Malawi.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of governance reforms also called conceptual innovation for public hospitals in Malawi.

Design/methodology/approach

It focuses on the reforms for central and district hospitals. It uses semi-structured interviews to collect data and thematic approach to analyse it.

Findings

The results show that the reforms for central hospitals are structurally well characterised as aimed at corporatisation though they are termed as automatisation. The terminological seems not to pose any harm on the direction of the reforms due to the thorough structural characterisation. On the other hand, reforms for district hospitals are vague as such implementation is retrogressive, in that, instead of progressively moving the hospitals towards greater autonomy the opposite is happening.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the significance of characterisation of the intended outcome on the direction of the reforms and proposes a framework to guide conceptual innovation for public hospitals in a devolution-mediated environment.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

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