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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2023

Andrew H. Appleyard

The British Library (BL) faces a significant challenge with storage space predicted to run out within the next three years. However, alongside a plan to create additional…

Abstract

Purpose

The British Library (BL) faces a significant challenge with storage space predicted to run out within the next three years. However, alongside a plan to create additional capacity, the BL also intends to take the opportunity to rethink the integration of storage and workflows in order to implement a fully optimised end-to-end model of content management. This approach will incorporate not only storage and workflow design and integration, but also the physical environments and facilities for staff and users.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on years of experience in the context of systemic industry changes to lead the reader into new thinking and opportunities in relation to print preservation and access. It should be noted that some of the aspirational new thinking described within this article may not come to fruition due to construction market inflation and resulting budgetary constraints.

Findings

As the national library of the UK, BL, like all libraries, has the responsibility of storing (preserving) its collections while making them accessible to everyone. Traditional models of physical storage can often operate in isolation from the processes that accompany them – creating silos of materials, completely remote from either the acquisition and description processes that precede their storage, or misaligned with the processes in place to support access.

Practical implications

The presentation of this conceptual thinking could help inform other libraries planning to build new print repositories.

Originality/value

The strategic approach outlined within this paper has adopted ideas and concepts from non-library applications, bringing them together to form a holistic solution that delivers the ultimate aims of a library within a modern context.

Details

Library Management, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 February 2019

Torben Juul Andersen, Simon Torp and Stefan Linder

This first chapter argues that turbulent environments require adaptive strategy for survival and continued prosperity and thereby introduces the attempts to determine effective…

Abstract

This first chapter argues that turbulent environments require adaptive strategy for survival and continued prosperity and thereby introduces the attempts to determine effective response capabilities in contemporary firms, which are presented in the ensuing chapters. The background in prior strategy research is outlined to position the various contributions within a proper backdrop as potential extensions to prior insights generated in the strategic management field. It suggests a need for multiple methodological approaches to gain new diverse and relevant knowledge from rich qualitative field studies as well as quantitative data probes and computational analyses. Finally, the ensuing chapters are briefly presented to provide a coherent view of the contributions made by this specific collection of chapters that the authors hope will inspire and fuel ongoing work in this important area.

Details

Strategic Responsiveness and Adaptive Organizations: New Research Frontiers in International Strategic Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-011-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of…

16440

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Alan Gregory and Andrew Hicks

This article reviews the way in which the law in England and Wales considers the valuation of companies, and argues that the issues arising from this legal perspective are…

441

Abstract

This article reviews the way in which the law in England and Wales considers the valuation of companies, and argues that the issues arising from this legal perspective are indicative of a gap between the economic theory and practice of company valuation. Furthermore, an analysis of the relevant case law reveals several interesting practical difficulties which may suggest a role for theoretical analysis. Equally, a lack of awareness of the economic theory of valuation is revealed on the part of the courts. It is argued that this lack of awareness may have implications for the practices of valuation by professional accounting firms that are currently observed in the UK. An examination of the theory of company valuation shows that there is widespread agreement on the basic principle of the approach to be followed in valuing the shares in a company; in short, it is the present value of the company's future cash flows. Although there is debate over issues such as the appropriate model to be used in pricing risk, and how to allow for the impact of taxation in arriving at the discount rate, this principle appears to be universally accepted. Although some investigations have been carried out into the practical context of company valuation in the UK (Arnold and Moizer 1984, Moizer and Arnold 1984, Day 1986, and Keane 1992), no attention has been paid in the economics and accounting literature to the legal context. This is perhaps surprising given that the courts are sometimes important users of company valuation reports. This article reviews the way in which the law in England and Wales considers the valuation of companies, and argues that the issues arising from this legal perspective are indicative of a gap between the economic theory and practice of company valuation. Furthermore, an analysis of the relevant case law reveals several interesting practical difficulties which may suggest a role for theoretical analysis. Equally, a lack of awareness of the economic theory of valuation is revealed on the part of the courts. Historically, one of the features of the English commercial courts has been their refusal to become involved in matters of commercial judgement. English judges have held themselves to be sophisticated technicians in law but self‐professed amateurs in commercial matters. Their role has been to hear expert witnesses and to weigh up their professional advice. This contrasts with the position in continental courts; for example in France, the judges sitting at first instance in the lower commercial courts are businessmen and women rather than lawyers, with the result that their approach and findings are likely to be less legalistic and more commercial. This English legal approach needs to be seen in the context of an increasing concern with valuation attributable to the changes brought about by Sections 459 to 461 of the Companies Act 1985, together with the recent case law. Section 459 of the Act is concerned with minority unfair prejudice actions and under that section a member may petition the court for an order on the grounds that the petitioner's interests have been, are being or will be unfairly prejudiced by the conduct of the company's affairs. A considerable body of case law has built up on what constitutes unfairly prejudicial conduct. Under section 461 the court may make such order as it thinks fit for giving relief including the purchase of the shares of any member of the company by other members or by the company itself. Here the crucial question for the courts and for the parties negotiating a buy‐out in the shadow of the courts is the amount of the valuation and the factor to be taken into account in reaching that valuation. In such circumstances, it might be expected that there would be considerable concern with the basis of the valuation. However, ‘basis’ can have several different meanings; in the first place, it could be defined as asset basis, in the sense that a valuation may be concerned with the replacement, ‘going concern’ or realisable value of the firm's assets. Second, there is a need to define what economic model has been used to derive the ‘going concern’ or economic value; it may be helpful to describe this as the economic model basis of the valuation. Third, there is the question as to whether the proportion of the equity held affects the value; this might be termed the control basis. As we show below, the concern of the theoretical literature is primarily with the second category, whereas the case law tends to concern itself with the first and third categories. In order to clarify the theoretical and practical considerations involved, the first section of this paper briefly reviews the theory of equity valuation and the second contrasts this with the rather limited evidence on UK valuation practice. In the third section, the legal issues involved are explained and the way in which the courts proceed in cases which involve the valuation of shares are reviewed. Although the courts rely on expert evidence in making a valuation, certain principles and guidelines for valuation are laid down by the courts, and these are analysed and contrasted with the prescriptions on valuation found in the finance literature.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2015

Joanne Savage and Amanda Murray

In the present paper we explore the long-term influence of childhood neglect on violent behavior in the transition to adulthood. In particular, we test whether neglect is…

Abstract

Purpose

In the present paper we explore the long-term influence of childhood neglect on violent behavior in the transition to adulthood. In particular, we test whether neglect is spuriously related to violence due to their common association with academic achievement, physical abuse, and general offending. We then ask whether neglect has an indirect effect on violence through its impact on parental attachment, alcohol use, emotional negativity, academic achievement, or staying in school.

Methodology/approach

We use two waves of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health (Add Health) and employ both regression models and INDIRECT, a syntax file that allows for the testing of indirect effects using SPSS (Preacher & Hayes, 2008).

Findings

We find that the long-term association between childhood neglect and violence in the transition to adulthood is robust in models controlling for GPA, physical abuse, and other forms of offending. Neglect did not have an indirect effect on violence through attachment, negative emotionality, or academic achievement but did have indirect effects on violence through its association with staying in school and with alcohol use.

Research implications

This set of analyses was exploratory in nature. Further research on neglect should be undertaken, using finely tuned measures and research questions. In addition, our findings imply that the association between neglect and later violent behavior may be intertwined with certain dynamics of physical abuse and alcohol use, which should be further studied.

Details

Violence and Crime in the Family: Patterns, Causes, and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-262-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1908

ATTENTION has been repeatedly drawn to certain drawbacks in the library profession which tend to hinder progress in many ways, and recently some discussion has taken place…

Abstract

ATTENTION has been repeatedly drawn to certain drawbacks in the library profession which tend to hinder progress in many ways, and recently some discussion has taken place concerning the long hours and short pay of library assistants. Some years ago there appeared, we believe, in one of Mr. Greenwood's valuable Library Year Books, an analysis of the hours of work in a large number of British Municipal Libraries, and it was made plain from this that a majority of assistants had to work considerably more than forty‐eight hours weekly. Conditions may have changed since then, although it is open to doubt, but the fact remains that too many assistants, and a considerable number of librarians in small places, are now working so long, and in such broken spells, as to preclude any possibility of attaining self‐culture or reasonable recreation. The case of the small town librarian is particularly distressing. In some instances he is a man who has been well‐trained in a large town library, and inspired by a mistaken ambition, elects to attain a position of independence by accepting the chief librarianship in a library of which he afterwards finds himself the sole officer. He is responsible for the cleaning, as well as the ordinary work of a librarian, and his efforts to convert a miserable library rate of a few pounds into an engine of immense efficiency (as expected by the local authority) are enough to make the financial operations of even an American millionaire seem petty in comparison. We have had several cases like this brought to notice within a few weeks, and they give added point to any plea for reform which may be advanced. One young man, well‐educated and well‐trained, undertook the charge of a small municipal library, chiefly because it happened to be near London, and he wished to be in touch with that great and attractive centre. He very soon discovered that the hours of the library were so arranged as to occupy his whole time and keep him employed all day, from 9 a.m. or earlier, till 10 p.m., with two short breaks which did not suffice for a visit to London. On Sunday he was too tired to think of London, apart from which, the institutions which interested him were closed, so that it is possible this librarian has not yet seen the longed‐for London of his cherished anticipations ! There are cases like this in the smaller libraries all over the country, where one official has to perform all the work in an unlimited number of hours. If, as is done in some places, the hours of opening are greatly curtailed in order to give the librarian his deserved and well‐earned rest, then the public suffer. On the other hand, a library administered by a single officer and kept open from nine to ten hours daily, is rather of the nature of a slave‐compound, in which an official is kept prisoner in the interests of the omnipotent ratepayer. Wherever small staffs are kept, there exists this tendency towards long hours, and a consequent eterioration in the efficiency and educational qualifications of assistants. A standing complaint among those who are engaged in the educational work of the Library Association is that so many candidates are deficient in the most elementary subjects, such as composition, spelling and arithmetic. This is undoubtedly caused by the employment of imperfectly educated assistants, who are afterwards tied so fast to their library duties that they are unable to find any time for study and reading. In libraries where small staffs and long hours of opening are found together, it is almost certain that the work‐hours of the assistants will be excessive, and the efficiency of the service impaired.

Details

New Library World, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1960

ONLY one or two topics of the Scarborough Conference will remain firmly in the minds of most of us. Most firmly, and more clearly than before, will be that of the National Lending…

Abstract

ONLY one or two topics of the Scarborough Conference will remain firmly in the minds of most of us. Most firmly, and more clearly than before, will be that of the National Lending Library and Dr. Urquhart's exposition of it or what it is intended to be. It may give no comfort, so far as librarianship is concerned, to existing librarians, but there is little that the public librarian has to fear from it. The second impression that remains is the acute awareness now prevalent of the need for science and technical training in school and college for many more men and women and our relation to that fact. The third was the so often expressed nervousness about the status of the librarian. Fourthly, was the local collection in the light of the ever‐changing character and habits of the people. The President's address was a dignified and grave statement of ideals, in the definition of libraries and librarianship, in book acquirement, reader‐service and in appreciation of the personalities who have made librarianship. It did not produce the press so fine an utterance demanded. What are we to say of the heading a great London paper gave to its two‐inch paragraph devoted to the first day of our Conference: “Librarians are told to be courteous”? To our regret we were unable to hear Mr. O'Leary's paper; judging from the summary in the Programme it was a fine exercise in robust commonsense. We content ourselves in this Editorial with further remarks on one or two of the matters we have mentioned above.

Details

New Library World, vol. 62 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1914

WHEN the history of librarianship comes to be written, the closing years of the 19th, and the opening ones of the 20th centuries must be recorded as a period of great advancement…

Abstract

WHEN the history of librarianship comes to be written, the closing years of the 19th, and the opening ones of the 20th centuries must be recorded as a period of great advancement. In every department of the profession is the advancement pronounced. Elaborate systems of classification have been perfected, cataloguing in its varied branches has been brought to a fine art, and special provision for children has, in some places, been carried so far as to be almost overdone. Specialisation for the uplifting of the masses has been the order of the day in every section, and in the near future the public libraries will compel recognition as educational centres. Not the least important part in this library awakening has been the education of the librarian, and it is now generally admitted that for efficient library service a man must not only be well‐educated, but highly trained in his work. Professional bibliographies and carefully planned courses of study are the signs of this advancement, and the provision of suitable literature to meet the higher educational demands, is one of the most pressing needs of our time.

Details

New Library World, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1909

The new sub‐department of the Local Government Board, recently created for the purpose of dealing with problems relating to the food supply as regards character and quality, is…

Abstract

The new sub‐department of the Local Government Board, recently created for the purpose of dealing with problems relating to the food supply as regards character and quality, is one apparently whose energies will, in the first place, bo chiefly directed to the institution of some control over the purity of the milk supply of the country. This National Pood Bureau appears to be primarily the outcome of the appeals that have been made from time to time to the authorities to exercise the powers invested in certain Government departments more stringently. Presumably attention will not be limited to the milk supply, important though that be, but in the near future various questions relating to cattle in general will bo dealt with. The two subjects of milk and meat are too closely allied to permit of each one being treated separately or without reference to the other. At the same time, if these closely related questions of milk and meat are to be adequately dealt with it is impossible to leave out of sight the subject of the wholesomeness or unwholesomeness of the imported meat that comes in such immense quantities into this country from abroad. At the present time the bulk of the meat so imported reaches this country from the United States, and in increasingly large quantities from South America. The justifiable outcry that was raised some years ago regarding the American meat packing scandals has, it would seem, quite died down; but unfortunately we have the strongest evidence that the temporary falling off in the trade in imported preserved meat between this country and the United States, which followed upon the agitation, has had but little salutary effect, and that the quality of the meat sent to this country from the United States still leaves much to be desired.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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