Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Andrew C. Gordon, Margaret Gordon and Jessica Dorr

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Native American Access to Technology Program (NAATP) was designed to provide computer and Internet access to Native peoples in the…

Downloads
1103

Abstract

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Native American Access to Technology Program (NAATP) was designed to provide computer and Internet access to Native peoples in the Four Corners area of the USA. Through this multi‐year effort, complex packages of hardware, software, installation and training have been made available to 43 tribes in 161 settings. An intensive, collaborative process resulted in a package carefully designed to fit tribal interests, circumstances and political arrangements, including multimedia (graphics‐intensive) equipment, language preservation software, and satellite connections to the Internet as necessary. This interim assessment concludes that the program has substantially increased tribal access to computing and information and has often fostered creative use of the technologies. Deeply embedded economic and political realities and their legacies remain, however, with substantial immediate and long‐term consequences.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

James Powell, Carol Hoover, Andrew Gordon and Michelle Mittrach

The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation and impact of a locally customized Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCiD) profile wizard. It also provides…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the implementation and impact of a locally customized Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCiD) profile wizard. It also provides a broader context for adopting ORCiD as an identity and single sign-on solution.

Design/methodology/approach

A custom web application was designed by a library team and implemented using a combination of the OAuth protocol and the ORCiD web services API. The tool leveraged a rich, curated set of local publication data, and exposed integration hooks that allowed other enterprise systems to connect ORCiD IDs with an internal employee identifier.

Findings

Initially the tool saw only modest use. Ultimately its success depended upon integration with other enterprise systems and the requirement of an ORCiD ID for internal funding requests, rather than exclusively on the merits of the tool. Since introduction, it has been used to generate over 1,660 ORCiDs from a population of 4,000 actively publishing researchers.

Practical implications

Organizations that desire to track publications by many affiliated authors would likely benefit from some sort of integration with ORCiD web services. This is particularly true for organizations that have many publishing researchers and/or track publications spanning many decades. Enterprise integration is crucial to the success of such a project.

Originality/value

Research inputs and research products are now primarily digital objects. So having a reliable system for associating researchers with their output is a big challenge that, if solved, could increase researcher impact and enhance digital scholarship. ORCiD IDs are a potential glue for many aspects of this problem. The design and implementation of the wizard eased and quickened adoption of ORCiD Ids by local researchers due in part to the ease with which a researcher can push publication information already held by the library to their profile. Subsequent integration of researcher ORCiD IDs with local enterprise systems has enabled real-time propagation of ORCiD IDs across research proposal workflow, publication review and content discovery systems.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1972

With a background of Scottish nobility, Eton, the guards and merchant banking, it would be easy to think of Andrew Gordon's career as a pre‐ordained success. But this…

Abstract

With a background of Scottish nobility, Eton, the guards and merchant banking, it would be easy to think of Andrew Gordon's career as a pre‐ordained success. But this 30‐year‐old managing director of a food‐to‐property company believes that you should stand or fall on ability, dismissing the old‐school‐tie philosophy of ‘it's not what you know, but who you know’. And although his Mayfair home reflects affluence, Gordon says he has no ambition to be worth ‘massive sums of money’.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 72 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Andrew Voyce and Jerome Carson

This paper aims to provide a profile of Andrew Voyce.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a profile of Andrew Voyce.

Design/methodology/approach

Andrew gives a short biography and is then interviewed by Jerome. Areas covered in the interview include the central role of Mrs Thatcher in closing down the old asylums, homelessness, education, benefits and digital art.

Findings

Andrew's recovery from long term mental health problems has seen him return to higher education. He failed to get his undergraduate degree, but decades later and with the encouragement of workers in the community, he completed both undergraduate and postgraduate studies. He talks of the negative impact of asylum care, especially the terrible side effect of akathisia, which resulted from the depot neuroleptic medication.

Originality/value

This paper shows a remarkable journey of recovery, from a life of being a “revolving door” patient, to homelessness, to re‐establishing an ordinary life in the community. The inmate's perspective is one that has largely been absent from narratives of asylum care.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Andrew Gordon

Denied by practitioners and erased from all official documents, the requirement that ex‐users be clean for two years before being employed is supposedly no longer with us…

Abstract

Denied by practitioners and erased from all official documents, the requirement that ex‐users be clean for two years before being employed is supposedly no longer with us. But, as Andrew Gordon reveals, despite the denials, the two‐year rule is alive and kicking and doing its best to keep ex‐users out of work.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Andrew Gordon

Lost in a world of jargon? Bamboozled by acronyms? Unsure of what your colleagues or therapist is talking about? Then fear not. You are not alone. Andrew Gordon is a…

Abstract

Lost in a world of jargon? Bamboozled by acronyms? Unsure of what your colleagues or therapist is talking about? Then fear not. You are not alone. Andrew Gordon is a seasoned service user who thinks services and the public sector have gone jargon‐mad. In a frank and hard‐hitting article he uncovers a world where professionals are so intimidated by abbreviations and terminology they are afraid to speak out and ask the unthinkable, ‘excuse me what does that acronym actually mean?’

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1976

Effectiveness and efficiency are often used interchangeably, as though they mean the same thing. But there is a difference, and it is one that explains a lot of the…

Abstract

Effectiveness and efficiency are often used interchangeably, as though they mean the same thing. But there is a difference, and it is one that explains a lot of the nonsenses which occur in the workplace. Gordon Humphreys and Andrew May — consultants with Binder Hamlyn Fry — describes the dangers of this confusion.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 76 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Gordon G. Andrew

Regardless of how well a company communicates with the press, it stands a good chance of being “burned” on occasion. From minor misquote to major hatchet‐job, these real…

Abstract

Regardless of how well a company communicates with the press, it stands a good chance of being “burned” on occasion. From minor misquote to major hatchet‐job, these real and perceived offenses occupy the attention of senior managers and their advisors, whose polite clarifications and outraged denials fill the “Letters to the Editor” section of every business and trade publication. Unfortunately, no standard methodology exists for redress of grievances with the press.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Bernard Scott and Ranulph Glanville

Downloads
311

Abstract

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Bernard Scott

Downloads
292

Abstract

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 30 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

1 – 10 of over 1000