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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Andrew Flockhart

To evaluate the potential of social return on investment (SROI) and investment ready tools (IRT) in enabling social enterprises to address the credibility gap associated…

Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate the potential of social return on investment (SROI) and investment ready tools (IRT) in enabling social enterprises to address the credibility gap associated with their ability to build capacity and to adopt a more commercial/entrepreneurial approach to their activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The differences that exist between social and financial returns in social enterprises are discussed. Reports the results of interviews conducted with key informants from the social investment industry in Scotland and England to explore their personal understanding or experience of SROI, the tools they use at present to assess social enterprise sustainability and capacity for growth and potential for investment, their likes and dislikes of SROI, and how they see SROI moving forward in a Scottish and/or UK context.

Findings

The results indicated that, should social enterprises find a way to overcome the resource implications of implementing SROI, this would enable them to become the preferred investment vehicle for new sources of social finance.

Originality/value

Presents the findings from an MBA dissertation entitled “Is Measuring Social Return on Investment (SROI) a tool that can be used to raise the profile of social enterprises and help attract investment?” (Flockhart 2004) and includes preliminary findings from a pilot programme conducted by CEiS Ltd on the introduction of an Investment Ready Tool (IRT) for social enterprise.

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Andrew Voyce and Jerome Carson

This paper aims to provide a profile of Andrew Voyce.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a profile of Andrew Voyce.

Design/methodology/approach

Andrew gives a short biography and is then interviewed by Jerome. Areas covered in the interview include the central role of Mrs Thatcher in closing down the old asylums, homelessness, education, benefits and digital art.

Findings

Andrew's recovery from long term mental health problems has seen him return to higher education. He failed to get his undergraduate degree, but decades later and with the encouragement of workers in the community, he completed both undergraduate and postgraduate studies. He talks of the negative impact of asylum care, especially the terrible side effect of akathisia, which resulted from the depot neuroleptic medication.

Originality/value

This paper shows a remarkable journey of recovery, from a life of being a “revolving door” patient, to homelessness, to re‐establishing an ordinary life in the community. The inmate's perspective is one that has largely been absent from narratives of asylum care.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2019

Abhinand Thaivalappil, Andrew Papadopoulos and Ian Young

The purpose of this paper is to apply the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) to determine which psychosocial factors are predictors of older adults’ safe food storage…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) to determine which psychosocial factors are predictors of older adults’ safe food storage practices at home.

Design/methodology/approach

An online structured questionnaire was developed and administered to older adults (60+). Two behavioural intention outcomes were investigated: thawing meats safely and storing leftovers within recommended guidelines. The survey instrument measured socio-demographic and TPB variables: attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and intentions. A measure of self-reported habitual behaviour was also recorded and used to determine whether past practice influenced behavioural intentions.

Findings

Respondents (n=78) demonstrated good intentions to safely defrost meats and store leftovers. The models accounted for 41 and 48 per cent of the variance in intentions to perform safe storage behaviours. Attitudes and subjective norms were predictors of intentions to safely thaw meats. Habitual behaviour was a significant predictor of behavioural intentions to safely store leftovers. Perceived behavioural control was a significant predictor of intentions to thaw meats and store leftovers.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size was small, and results are to be interpreted with caution.

Practical implications

The results indicate that theory-based solutions to solving food safety among consumers may be a feasible strategy.

Originality/value

The study is the first of its kind to apply the TPB to this consumer group.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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