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1 – 10 of 22
Article
Publication date: 15 January 2019

Elizabeth Shepherd, Jenny Bunn, Andrew Flinn, Elizabeth Lomas, Anna Sexton, Sara Brimble, Katherine Chorley, Emma Harrison, James Lowry and Jessica Page

Open government data and access to public sector information is commonplace, yet little attention has focussed on the essential roles and responsibilities in practice of the…

3297

Abstract

Purpose

Open government data and access to public sector information is commonplace, yet little attention has focussed on the essential roles and responsibilities in practice of the information and records management professionals, who enable public authorities to deliver open data to citizens. This paper aims to consider the perspectives of open government and information practitioners in England on the procedural and policy implications of open data across local public authorities.

Design/methodology/approach

Using four case studies from different parts of the public sector in England (local government, higher education, National Health Service and hospital trust), the research involved master’s level students in the data collection and analysis, alongside academics, thus enhancing the learning experience of students.

Findings

There was little consistency in the location of responsibility for open government data policy, the range of job roles involved or the organisational structures, policy and guidance in place to deliver this function. While this may reflect the organisational differences and professional concerns, it makes it difficult to share best practice. Central government policy encourages public bodies to make their data available for re-use. However, local practice is very variable and perhaps understandably responds more to local organisational strategic and resource priorities. The research found a lack of common metadata standards for open data, different choices about which data to open, problems of data redundancy, inconsistency and data integrity and a wide variety of views on the corporate and public benefits of open data.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to England and to non-national public bodies and only draws data from a small number of case studies.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the debate about emerging issues around the complexities of open government data and its public benefits, contributing to the discussions around technology-enabled approaches to citizen engagement and governance. It offers new insights into the interaction between open data and public policy objectives, drawing on the experience of local public sectors in England.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 29 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Elizabeth Shepherd, Alice Stevenson and Andrew Flinn

University College London (UCL) ran a research project over 12 months in 2008‐2009, funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council, which examined what the impact of the UK

4160

Abstract

Purpose

University College London (UCL) ran a research project over 12 months in 2008‐2009, funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council, which examined what the impact of the UK Freedom of Information (FOI) Act 2000 had been on records management services in local government. This paper aims to report on some of the findings of the study, with a focus on the practical records management issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The research considered the three perspectives of records managers: institutional FOI; policy managers; and FOI requestors and user communities. Following an extensive literature review, qualitative research methods were used to gather data, specifically semi‐structured interviewing of 27 individuals from 19 different institutions in London and the South East of England and with 11 requestors.

Findings

The findings reported in this paper focus on records services in local government, in particular their organisational location and status, and aspects of the management of current and non‐current records, including those in digital formats.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is one of the outputs of a grant‐funded project, which documents the results of research in FOI from a records management perspective and makes a contribution to the wider debate about access to information. It attempts to survey user responses, which has been an overlooked aspect of other FOI and records management research.

Practical implications

There are some implications for good practice in records management policy and systems and in the location of records functions in local government.

Originality/value

Local government is an under‐researched field in respect of information management and FOI, when compared with other parts of the public sector, and this is therefore a significant contribution to knowledge in this field.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Aiden M. Bettine and Lindsay Kistler Mattock

This paper aims to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the concept of community archives, offering a critique of the community archives discourse through a historical…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the concept of community archives, offering a critique of the community archives discourse through a historical case study focused on the origins of the Gerber/Hart LGBTQ library and archives in Chicago.

Design/methodology/approach

This study explores the archival collections of the founders of the Gerber/Hart library and archives and the librarians that have worked there as a means for understanding the origins of the archival impulse, the rationale for building the collections and the practices that shaped the collections during the first decade of the organization’s history.

Findings

The historical analysis of the Gerber/Hart library and archives situates community archives and LGBTQ collections within the broader historical context that lead to the founding of the organization and reveals deep connections to the information professions not previously considered by those studying community archives.

Originality/value

The paper offers a reconceptualization of community archives as archival projects initiated, controlled and maintained by the members of a self-defined community. The authors emphasize the role of the archival impulse or the historical origins of the collection and the necessity for full-community control, setting clear boundaries between community archives and other participatory archival models that engage the community.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 68 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2017

Zhiying Lian

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a qualitative study exploring the conditions associated with the creation, preservation and transmission of Shuishu archives…

2025

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a qualitative study exploring the conditions associated with the creation, preservation and transmission of Shuishu archives in China, and the crises today in their preservation and transmission and the reasons behind them. It also proposes activation mechanisms to shift Shuishu archives from jeopardized collective memory to preservable cultural memory.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews and ethnographic fieldwork were conducted over the course of a month in 2015.

Findings

The creation, preservation and transmission of Shuishu archives in the community of the Shui rely upon the community’s closed system. But this system has been broken as a result of modernization and wide use of new media in China. To preserve and transmit Shuishu archives to future generations, there needs to be mutual trust and equitable cooperation between government archives and the Shuishushi. The “cultural consciousness” of the Shui needs to be stimulated, and more members of the Shui and the whole of society need to participate in the preservation and transmission of this distinctive memory.

Practical implications

The study can provide a provocative example for education in preservation and LIS about community culture and archiving, and the preservation of social memory, identity and culture. The activation mechanisms seek to aid in the preservation and transmission of Shuishu archives and other similar community memory.

Originality/value

The study uses semi-structured interviews and ethnographic methodology to develop a rich understanding of the history and the status quo of the preservation and transmission of Shuishu archives. It redefines Shuishu archives and sheds light on the roles government archives should play in the preservation and transmission of Shuishu archives.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Andrew Flinn

427

Abstract

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Susan Em

574

Abstract

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Makiba J. Foster and Meredith R. Evans

Throughout history various social movements have galvanized the masses to actualize a more inclusive and humane world. It is through libraries and archives that the authors can…

2089

Abstract

Purpose

Throughout history various social movements have galvanized the masses to actualize a more inclusive and humane world. It is through libraries and archives that the authors can revisit those moments in time to better understand the past and hopefully build a better future. Issues of sustainability within libraries and archives collecting traditional materials from important historical events still create somewhat of a challenge, but with advancements of technologies and workflows, the authors are now better equipped to manage and preserve those items. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

However, in terms of the historical importance of the content from recent protests against police violence, the question arises of how does one create sustainable processes on materials that are captured on temporal technologies or how does an institution create trust where protesters and activists will freely place their content in a digital archive?

Findings

Washington University in St Louis Libraries’ project Documenting Ferguson, is attempting to tackle some of those challenging questions and working through the implications of a non-traditional social movement’s impact on archival collection building and future research, teaching, and learning. Both authors served on the steering committee as employees of Washington University Libraries upon project inception.

Originality/value

Rapid response collecting with the intent to preserve and make accessible relevant born digital content for future generations and to develop unlikely relationships with neighboring community to ensure history is documented from multiple view points.

Details

Library Management, vol. 37 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2022

Erin Lawrimore, David Gwynn and Stacey Krim

In the decades since the founding of the Society of American Archivists (SAA) in 1938, the array of functions considered core to archival work have grown and evolved. In the early…

Abstract

In the decades since the founding of the Society of American Archivists (SAA) in 1938, the array of functions considered core to archival work have grown and evolved. In the early years of SAA, the profession was largely focused on issues of collection maintenance, heavily emphasizing preservation as the fundamental mission of the archivist. Yet, at this time, there were archivists calling on their colleagues to engage with audiences outside of the archival reading room. It was not until the social history movements in the 1970s, however, that discussions of outreach as a core function of the archivist's work took hold in the profession. From the 1970s and moving through to today, outreach and proactive engagement with external communities has moved from a peripheral activity of the archivist to one seen as essential to the overall success of an archival program. In this chapter, we examine the evolving discourse surrounding outreach and engagement activities by archivists, focusing on how outreach has been discussed in professional literature. We also explore ways in which this shift in professional perspective is reflected in the work done today by archivists at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Details

Building Community Engagement and Outreach in Libraries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-367-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Lucinda Charlotte Flinn, Charlotte Louise Hassett and Louise Braham

The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) (Wechsler, 2008) is a cognitive assessment that is often used in secure forensic settings, however it has not been…

Abstract

Purpose

The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) (Wechsler, 2008) is a cognitive assessment that is often used in secure forensic settings, however it has not been normed on this population. The purpose of this paper is to develop forensic normative data.

Design/methodology/approach

Patient files in a high secure forensic hospital were reviewed in order to obtain completed WAIS-IV (Wechsler, 2008) assessments and scores from the five indexes (verbal comprehension, perceptual reasoning, working memory, processing speed and full scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ)). This included reviewing patient files from all directorates, including male mental health, male learning disability, male personality disorder and the women’s service, yielding a sample size of n=86.

Findings

The qualitative descriptors obtained across the hospital ranged between extremely low and superior. The learning disability service scored significantly lower than the mental health and personality disorder services in verbal comprehension index, perceptual reasoning index, working memory index and FSIQ, and significantly lower than the mental health, personality disorder and women’s services in processing speed index. Mean scores from this study were significantly lower in comparison to those from the UK validation study (Wechsler, 2008).

Practical implications

The significant difference between scores from the current study and those from the UK validation study (Wechsler, 2008) highlights the need to have appropriate normative data for forensic populations. Clinicians should consider interventions that may serve to increase cognitive function, such as cognitive remediation therapy.

Originality/value

Whilst several special group studies have previously been conducted, this study is the first to develop forensic normative data for the WAIS-IV (Wechsler, 2008). Whilst the sample size was relatively small with limited female participants, the data collated will enable clinicians working in forensic establishments to interpret their assessments in light of this information.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

David Luyombya

The purpose of this paper is to present empirical research findings regarding the contribution of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), such as computers, to creating

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present empirical research findings regarding the contribution of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), such as computers, to creating and managing digital records in the Ugandan Public Service (UPS). It seeks to review the ICT developments in Uganda and to discuss the extent to which UPS agencies have adopted digital record‐keeping systems, how the management of digital records is incorporated with ICT strategies, and to identify challenges faced.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature on ICT developments in Uganda and empirical studies dealing with management of digital records in the UPS is presented. The review of empirical research findings is based on 23 Government of Uganda (GoU) ministries. Applying both quantitative and qualitative approaches, a survey research design was adopted. Multiple methods of data analysis including coding, tabulation and use of descriptive statements were also used to ascertain the quality of the findings.

Findings

The study revealed that there are attempts to improve ICT capabilities and infrastructure in Uganda but a critical gap exists in the approach since the management of public sector records is not being addressed as part of this initiative. There is no evidence of establishing an ICT infrastructure that will provide the solution to digital records management (DRM) problems. Other weaknesses relate to gaps and poor linkages in the overall Records and Information Technology Department (RITD) itself, as it fails to address the requirement for DRM.

Research limitations/implications

This research looks only at the Uganda Public Service.

Practical implications

The paper provides useful information and data to records and archives management scholars, educators/consultants/researchers and students undertaking studies in management of records, including management of digital records within and outside Uganda.

Originality/value

This subject has never been tackled in this way before for Uganda, and the findings are timely for the ongoing e‐governance initiatives.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

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