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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Lutz Preuss and Andrew Fearne

Despite the growing importance and complexity of modern supply chains, little scholarly attention has been devoted to cognitive processes in supply chain management (SCM)…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the growing importance and complexity of modern supply chains, little scholarly attention has been devoted to cognitive processes in supply chain management (SCM). In particular, we know little about the structure of supply chain managers’ cognitive frames and how differences between frames affect sustainable supply chain management (SSCM).

Design/methodology/approach

Given the relative scarcity of the topic, this paper uses a conceptual approach. Building on prior literature from cognitive psychology and related areas, it develops ideal types of cognitive frames with which supply chain managers approach sustainability-related decisions.

Findings

This study first develops three ideal-type cognitive frames – unidimensional, hierarchical and paradoxical. This paper then shows that it makes a difference which one of these a supply chain manager holds when addressing issues related to sustainable supply. Thereafter, this study discusses the antecedents that can explain why a manager holds a particular cognitive frame.

Research limitations/implications

This paper represents one of the first analyses of how the structure of a supply chain manager’s cognitive frame impacts their firm’s sustainable supply initiatives. Although developed with regard to SSCM, the arguments have implications for other management areas too, not least for the education of future SCM professionals.

Originality/value

Given their boundary-spanning role, attention to the cognitive processes of supply chain managers is crucial to understanding the conditions under which firms can address sustainability challenges in their supply chains.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Ricardo Malagueño, Ismail Gölgeci and Andrew Fearne

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of perceived relational justice on the relationship between key customer categorization and performance of small food…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of perceived relational justice on the relationship between key customer categorization and performance of small food and drink producers in supermarket supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data are derived from a sample of (small-scale) suppliers of local and regional food to a large British supermarket. Partial least squares regression analysis was used to test a conceptual framework, which positions relational justice as a mediator in the relationship between key customer categorization and supplier performance, moderated by the length of the relationship.

Findings

The findings reveal that small suppliers who perceive their treatment by their key customers as fair tend to achieve higher business performance, which supports the hypothesized mediating role of relational justice on supplier performance. However, this research found no evidence to support the hypothesis that this role is moderated by the length of the relationship between the supplier and buyer.

Originality/value

This paper makes a novel empirical contribution, focusing on performance outcomes for small-scale suppliers in a highly competitive environment (fast-moving consumer goods) with customers (supermarkets) who have significant market power. Accordingly, the paper shows that the way supermarket buyers treat their suppliers matters more for the performance of their suppliers than the very fact that they are key customers.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Ray Ryder and Andrew Fearne

Looks at the way in which a pizza manufacturing company, supplying both branded and own‐label products to the Irish and UK retail markets, undertook a major restructuring…

6492

Abstract

Looks at the way in which a pizza manufacturing company, supplying both branded and own‐label products to the Irish and UK retail markets, undertook a major restructuring of its procurement and manufacturing processes. Numerous sub‐processing activities were having adverse effects on capability utilization and manufacturing efficiency at a time of increasing demand. Process re‐engineering was required. Illustrates the approaches taken towards two projects: first, cheese supply and, second, packaging. Notes there was a steep learning curve for the management and operations staff and also resistance to change from within the firm and from some suppliers. Provides a list of critically important points learned from the experience.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 August 2022

Simone Regina Didonet and Andrew Fearne

This paper explores the nuanced relationship between individual and firm performance through the lens of market information use, in the specific context of small…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the nuanced relationship between individual and firm performance through the lens of market information use, in the specific context of small businesses, shedding light on the specificity of information use and impact of information use on both types of performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixture of subjective and objective data from a sample of small food producers engaged in an action research project with a major UK supermarket was used to test hypotheses developed from the information management, marketing and small business literature.

Findings

The results suggest that the effective use of market information has a significant impact on the performance of both the individual and the organization but independently of each other. The result provides evidence of the potential “disconnection” between individual and organizational levels of performance and the tension that exists in small businesses between operational and strategic decision-making and the use of market information therein.

Research limitations/implications

While the author's study benefits from access to individual decision-makers and objective organizational performance data, the study is not without its limitations. Chief among these is the small sample size. Moreover, while there are clear benefits to working with a homogeneous sample of small food producers supplying the same key customer in the same market, generalizing to small food businesses operating in other distributions channels and small businesses in other sectors is also difficult.

Practical implications

When analyzing the performance of marketing managers, owner-managers should pay attention to the incentives for them to invest time and effort in the effective use of market information as the disconnection between individual and firm performance can have negative implications for their personal development and the overall firm performance.

Originality/value

This study explores a missing link in the extant body of small business literature, i.e., the role played by key individuals with responsibility for the marketing function within small businesses and the relationship between small businesses' approach to the use of market information and performance at a functional level and the overall firm performance.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2021

Andrew Fearne, Beverly Wagner, Natalie McDougall and David Loseby

COVID-19 has shaken views of what is normal and what is possible, raising questions about conventional norms, ways of working and our understanding of agility. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

COVID-19 has shaken views of what is normal and what is possible, raising questions about conventional norms, ways of working and our understanding of agility. This paper aims to respond to calls for empirical research of supply chain capacities in times of crisis and offer a unique perspective on agile procurement and supply chain management from a case study of the Ventilator Challenge.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive case study was undertaken, adopting an inductive approach. Interviews were conducted with the major stakeholders tasked with the design, sourcing and assembly of ventilators.

Findings

Findings are delivered across four key areas: context; procurement and supply chain management; technology and culture; and environment. Key challenges and enablers are discussed, highlighting the critical roles of trust, empowerment and enabling technologies in the construction of an entirely new ventilator supply chain, from scratch, in five weeks.

Originality/value

This paper delivers contributions for both academic research and practice. The case study offers rich new insights relating to procurement in times of crisis, contributing to efforts to advance beyond outdated approaches for resilience in literature. Practical contributions arise in highlighting the significance of adapted sourcing and recruitment, technology, collaboration, people and power of purpose in enabling agility and achieving the impossible.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Elizabeth Mawson and Andrew Fearne

Notes the decline in household expenditure on food, an increase in meals consumed outside the home and the consequent increasing importance of restaurant chains. Using a…

6443

Abstract

Notes the decline in household expenditure on food, an increase in meals consumed outside the home and the consequent increasing importance of restaurant chains. Using a case study approach, attempts to identify the key elements of the buying process in a sample of UK chain restaurants. Uses the BUYGRID model as the theoretical framework for this research, pinpointing the evaluation criteria used by the companies and observing their relation to the procurement procedures subsequently adopted. Concludes that using such a framework can assist in the development of supplier marketing strategies which focus on the organizational requirements and decision‐making processes.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Andrew Fearne

This case study describes the evolution of supply chain partnerships in the British beef industry, driven by changing consumer demand, food safety legislation, a…

5891

Abstract

This case study describes the evolution of supply chain partnerships in the British beef industry, driven by changing consumer demand, food safety legislation, a concentrated and highly competitive retail sector and the BSE crisis. The case examples demonstrate the importance of establishing trust in supply chain partnerships, breaking out of the spot trading environment which characterises commodity markets and focusing explicitly on value added initiatives as a source of differentiation and competitive advantage.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/13598549910279567. When citing…

4356

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/13598549910279567. When citing the article, please cite: Andrew Fearne, David Hughes, (1999), “Success factors in the fresh produce supply chain: insights from the UK”, Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, Vol. 4 Iss: 3, pp. 120 - 131.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

David H. Taylor and Andrew Fearne

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the problems with demand management in fresh food value chains and to propose a framework for demand analysis and improved demand…

7882

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the problems with demand management in fresh food value chains and to propose a framework for demand analysis and improved demand management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on empirical evidence from multiple case studies undertaken in the UK food industry.

Findings

Evidence from the case studies indicates a consistent misalignment of demand and supply, due to demand amplification, poor production systems and inconsistencies with information and data handling procedures.

Research limitations/implications

The case study evidence is limited to the UK context and is therefore unlikely to be representative of the global situation in fresh food value chains. The proposed framework is based on the case study evidence but has not been formally tested.

Practical implications

More collaboration, information sharing and joint planning from primary production through to retailing is critical if fresh food value chains are to function efficiently and effectively in retail environments where promotional activity creates significant uncertainty.

Originality/value

Demand management has received little attention to date, outside the industry framework of ECR. This paper is the first to propose a framework for improvement based on greater collaboration and joint planning that extends beyond the retailer‐manufacturer interface

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Susan A. Hornibrook, Mary McCarthy and Andrew Fearne

For supermarkets in the UK and the Republic of Ireland, the strategic importance of own label or retail brands is crucial, with sales of fresh beef almost exclusively sold…

3130

Abstract

Purpose

For supermarkets in the UK and the Republic of Ireland, the strategic importance of own label or retail brands is crucial, with sales of fresh beef almost exclusively sold under the retail brand. Given safety and quality issues, this study seeks to understand pre‐pack consumers' perceptions of risk associated with beef in the Republic of Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on previous qualitative research, and using a survey methodology and adopting a perceived risk theoretical framework, face‐to‐face interviews with purchasers of pre‐pack beef from supermarkets were conducted in Cork, Waterford and Limerick.

Findings

The results confirm that for these particular beef purchasers, food safety and health issues are still the main concerns. However, perceptions of risk are reduced through loyalty to supermarkets, confirming that the investment by retailers in supply chain policies and strategies has paid off in terms of reducing customers' perceptions of risk associated with food safety.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of the research is that perceptions of risk and coping strategies are specific to the product category; therefore, results cannot be generalised to other categories.

Practical implications

The findings demonstrate that a more focussed approach to marketing beef could include strategies based upon understanding particular aspects of perceived risk.

Originality/value

A deeper understanding of consumers' risk perceptions and risk reducing strategies is necessary as consumers' perceptions of risk can both respond to and influence the strategies adopted at both firm and industry level. In particular, an understanding of perceived risk is particularly necessary for retailers following an own brand strategy in general.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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