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Article

Lauren Grace Moulds and Andrew Day

Adolescent violence towards parents (AVTP) has damaging impacts on family relationships, however, little is known about the characteristics of the families in which it…

Abstract

Purpose

Adolescent violence towards parents (AVTP) has damaging impacts on family relationships, however, little is known about the characteristics of the families in which it occurs. The purpose of this paper is to synthesize current knowledge of the AVTP characteristics to help to inform the development of more effective community responses.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for a Rapid Evidence Assessment taking an ecological approach to organize current knowledge about the characteristics of both victims and perpetrators of AVTP. It synthesized 20 empirical studies identified from a systemic review of published literature.

Findings

The assessment concludes that adolescents who perpetrate AVTP typically experience high levels of comorbid mental health concerns, drug and alcohol use, anger difficulties and trauma. The victims (parents) are characterized as having strained relationships with other family members and trauma profiles.

Practical implications

Policy and practice responses should be tailored to systemically address needs in the identified areas. This review further illustrates the limitations of current knowledge, highlighting inconsistencies in both definitions and findings, particularly related to key characteristics.

Originality/value

This paper is the first of its kind to systemically search this literature and only include the most rigorously designed studies. It adds value to the developing field of AVTP by providing the scaffolding of the characteristics of families who have been impacted.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

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Article

Christina Julie Kozar and Andrew Day

Offending behavior change programs play an important role in the prevention of criminal behavior, particularly when offered to violent offenders. There is, however, little…

Abstract

Purpose

Offending behavior change programs play an important role in the prevention of criminal behavior, particularly when offered to violent offenders. There is, however, little consensus about how content should be delivered, despite agreement that the development of a strong therapeutic alliance (TA) is an important determinant of outcome. The purpose of this paper is to explore how the TA is formed within correctional programs.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 27 therapists who delivered correctional group treatment explored issues relating to the role of the alliance in offending behavior programs. A grounded theory methodology was employed to develop a conceptual understanding of therapist perspectives and practises.

Findings

Three different modes of practice were identified: “educative” to enforce boundaries of group behavior; “engagement” to promote a collaborative approach; and “therapeutic” to enhance client insight.

Practical implications

Greater awareness of the skills and supports required to successfully develop strong TAs in correctional populations may assist better retention and treatment outcomes in offending behavior programs. The ability to work flexibly between different modes of practise may prove important to rehabilitation efforts.

Originality/value

A model of the TA based on therapists’ accounts of their practise in correctional programs is presented. It is anticipated that, particularly for novice correctional therapists, exploration of the ways in which the alliance can be established and ruptures responded to will enhance treatment efficacy, particularly in treating violent offenders who can be challenging to engage.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

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Article

Ashlee Curtis, Keith R. McVilly, Andrew Day, William R. Lindsay, John L. Taylor and Todd E. Hogue

Fire setters who have an intellectual disability (ID) are often identified as posing a particular danger to the community although relatively little is known about their…

Abstract

Purpose

Fire setters who have an intellectual disability (ID) are often identified as posing a particular danger to the community although relatively little is known about their characteristics, treatment and support needs. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study describes the characteristics of 134 residents of low, medium and high security ID facilities in the UK who have either an index offence of arson, a violent index offence or a sexual index offence.

Findings

Index arson offenders who had an ID had multiple prior convictions, a history of violent offending and a high likelihood of having a comorbid mental disorder. There were many shared characteristics across the three groups.

Practical implications

The current study suggests that offenders who have ID who set fires have treatment needs that are similar to those of violent and sex offenders. It follows that fire setters who have an ID may also benefit from participating in more established offending behaviour treatment programs, such as cognitive behaviour therapy programs, developed for other types of offender.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few which has investigated the characteristics and treatment needs of persons who have an ID who set fires. In particular, it is one of the first to compare the characteristics and treatment needs for persons with ID who set fires, to those who have committed violent and sexual offences.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

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Article

Adrian Darakai, Andrew Day and Joe Graffam

Ex-prisoners often face significant challenges in their efforts to find meaningful and stable work, undermining their chances of successful reintegration back into the…

Abstract

Purpose

Ex-prisoners often face significant challenges in their efforts to find meaningful and stable work, undermining their chances of successful reintegration back into the community. These problems are likely to be compounded for those who have an intellectual disability (ID), given evidence that the disabled generally experience high levels of discrimination when applying for and maintaining jobs. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether members of the public hold different attitudes and expectations towards the employment of ex-offenders who have an ID and a history of criminal offending.

Design/methodology/approach

Samples of 642 participants, recruited via social media, were presented with vignettes, and then completed a short survey designed to measure their attitudes and expectations towards the employment of ex-offenders.

Findings

Whilst the presence of a mild ID did not significantly affect community attitudes towards ex-offender employment, it did change expectations about employment outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

It appears that ex-offenders are perceived as a homogenous group of people, despite actual and substantial differences existing within this population.

Practical implications

There is a need to actively educate the community about differences between subgroups of ex-offenders in relation to the employment needs of those with an ID.

Social implications

The social inclusion of ex-offenders with an ID lies at the heart of any effective and progressive criminal justice policy.

Originality/value

This is one of the only studies that has examined public attitudes towards this group.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

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Article

Moira Slater

Senior dietician Moira Slater BSc, SRD describes how a dedicated and enthusiastic team improved the quality of life among elderly patients by introducing healthy eating…

Abstract

Senior dietician Moira Slater BSc, SRD describes how a dedicated and enthusiastic team improved the quality of life among elderly patients by introducing healthy eating with a novel approach

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 88 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

Lynne Zwink

– This paper presents the viewpoint of a parent of two children with Fragile X syndrome.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents the viewpoint of a parent of two children with Fragile X syndrome.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the author's views of her and her family's experience of Fragile X syndrome.

Findings

The paper provides the author's perspective on the impact that the condition has had on family life.

Originality/value

The paper provides a unique insight into the day-to-day experiences of a parent of two children with Fragile X syndrome.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

William A. Paton: A Study of his Accounting Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-408-4

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Article

Lonn Lanza‐Kaduce, Roger Dunham, Ronald L. Akers and Paul Cromwell

Taking advantage of the breakdown of formal social control directly following Hurricane Andrew in Miami, Florida this paper conducts a naturally occurring breaching…

Abstract

Taking advantage of the breakdown of formal social control directly following Hurricane Andrew in Miami, Florida this paper conducts a naturally occurring breaching experiment to examine the deeper structure of values about policing and police practices. Both citizens of the damaged neighborhoods and the attending police were interviewed to determine the degree of consensus/dissensus concerning ideal and actual priorities of policing during the crisis period. The findings reveal a remarkable degree of consensus among citizens and the police. The implications for a consensus versus a conflict view of policing are discussed.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Book part

Stephanie Hartwell

There remains a gap in the research on the characteristics, service needs, and experiences of persons with mental illness post incarceration. This analysis uses data…

Abstract

There remains a gap in the research on the characteristics, service needs, and experiences of persons with mental illness post incarceration. This analysis uses data collected by the Massachusetts Forensic Transition Team program to describe the characteristics of the offenders with mental illness and to examine the relationship of particular characteristics towards community reintegration and adaptation post release from correctional custody. Length of incarceration (misdemeanor or felony sentence structure) and service needs at release are expected to be associated with the ability to adapt, stigma, and, in turn, short-term dispositions in the community or more structured settings.I first met Andrew in a medium security prison in the fall of 2001. He had spent the majority of his adult life in prison. During the first of three incarcerations, he served five years and was released to live in the community, which he did for almost a year, until he was re-arrested and sentenced for 2 more years. This time, when he was released, he was in the community for only 2 weeks before being arrested and re-incarcerated. Andrew grew up in South Boston. His family has a history of mental illness and alcoholism. Andrew is bipolar, suffering bouts of manic depression, and has a substance abuse problem. His drug of choice is cocaine, which he uses intravenously. He is HIV positive. He is in his early 30s. Andrew's current sentence is 5 years for 26 counts of malicious destruction of property and motor vehicle theft. While he is attempting to get his sentence revised based on his health status, he acknowledges he has difficulty living in the community. Of prison life he says, “I excel in here!” He works a half an hour a day sweeping his unit, “and then I have the rest of the day to myself”. Andrew is presentable and articulate. He participates in release planning. When he is in the community he seeks out appropriate services. Nonetheless, he has difficulty staying out of prison.

Details

Community-Based Interventions for Criminal Offenders with Severe Mental Illness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-183-5

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Book part

Matthew R. Griffis

This exploratory study, a Ph.D. dissertation completed at the University of Western Ontario in 2013, examines the materially embedded relations of power between library…

Abstract

This exploratory study, a Ph.D. dissertation completed at the University of Western Ontario in 2013, examines the materially embedded relations of power between library users and staff in public libraries and how building design regulates spatial behavior according to organizational objectives. It considers three public library buildings as organization spaces (Dale & Burrell, 2008) and determines the extent to which their spatial organizations reproduce the relations of power between the library and its public that originated with the modern public library building type ca. 1900. Adopting a multicase study design, I conducted site visits to three, purposefully selected public library buildings of similar size but various ages. Site visits included: blueprint analysis; organizational document analysis; in-depth, semi-structured interviews with library users and library staff; cognitive mapping exercises; observations; and photography.

Despite newer approaches to designing public library buildings, the use of newer information technologies, and the emergence of newer paradigms of library service delivery (e.g., the user-centered model), findings strongly suggest that the library as an organization still relies on many of the same socio-spatial models of control as it did one century ago when public library design first became standardized. The three public libraries examined show spatial organizations that were designed primarily with the librarian, library materials, and library operations in mind far more than the library user or the user’s many needs. This not only calls into question the public library’s progressiveness over the last century but also hints at its ability to survive in the new century.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-744-3

Keywords

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