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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Andrew Comrie

This paper aims to discuss and provide examples of different collaborative models that are emerging and to argue that a technology‐enhanced, socio‐constructivist approach…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss and provide examples of different collaborative models that are emerging and to argue that a technology‐enhanced, socio‐constructivist approach to future collaborative curriculum design and delivery enables partnership working and provides curriculum design solutions that supports delivery in different ways. The paper seeks to argue that the driver for motivating programme teams to work collaboratively and embed technology into future programme designs comes both from a changing economic and funding climate and a pedagogic driver to offer value to the learner. The paper aims to present exemplars of using technology to transform programme delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

Outcomes and deliverables from different technology‐enhanced learning projects and the work of the Edinburgh, Lothians, Fife and Borders Regional Articulation Hub (ELRAH) have been examined to establish whether technology‐enhanced learning, teaching and access models could enable universities and colleges to work collaboratively to provide a more flexible and accessible model of HE in the future. The paper uses examples of technologies and professional development that is being used to support technology‐enhanced, collaborative HE programme development, and, while the paper focuses specifically on the debates taking place in Scotland, the insights provided are relevant to similar debates taking place in the rest of the UK.

Findings

The paper argues that “edgeless universities” are needed to achieve the reforms needed to deliver an HE system that offers the flexibility of access and efficient delivery required in the future. A future higher education system that demands efficiency and more flexibility through partnership and collaboration must use technology to form partnerships if they are to generate radical changes to future programme designs that enable flexible access. The paper argues that a traditional “one size fits all“ model for tertiary education does not meet a vision for wider access to HE. Institutions will need to adopt different strategies for engaging staff in collaborative curriculum developments and need to provide strong leadership to direct engagement.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is that it presents ways in which FE and HE institutions can work collaboratively to create a more radical, technology‐enabled, collaborative approach to future HE curriculum development in Scotland.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Mark Johnson

Abstract

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

Gary D. Libecap and Sherry Hoskinson

This volume centers on introducing and exploring issues of and approaches to demonstrating the potential nonexclusively commercial values of individual university…

Abstract

This volume centers on introducing and exploring issues of and approaches to demonstrating the potential nonexclusively commercial values of individual university innovations, such as social, ecological, and economic values of innovation that may be realized through movement to the private marketplace. The volume papers comprised the basis for discussion and formation of a 2008 colloquium that was conceptualized and organized by the McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship and co-hosted by the McGuire Center and the Office of Technology Transfer at The University of Arizona. The goal of the colloquium and conference volume was to increase university-based ability to advance innovation by conducting technology-specific assessments of the social (and other noncommercial) gains of the individual innovation. New technologies and knowledge sets generated by university faculty are most frequently measured for potential academic value by the innovating faculty member, department, and general peer structure, and for potential commercial value when appropriate by technology transfer offices and other market-oriented units that are charged with the management of the intellectual property of the institution. A formal, institutionally supported valuation of the social, ecological, and/or economic potential of individual innovations may provide evidence of gain needed to motivate more parties to become engaged in academic entrepreneurship. Thus, the capacities of colleges and universities to more confidently forecast the noncommercial value of new knowledge and discovery has the potential to act as an additional link in the often disconnected value proposition of university innovation.

Details

Measuring the Social Value of Innovation: A Link in the University Technology Transfer and Entrepreneurship Equation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-467-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

H.G.A. Hughes

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Bob Duckett

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2017

Lauren C. Johnson

Local adaptations to economic blight and overreliance on the tourism industry demonstrate significant aspects of resilience and risk among Caribbean populations. Those…

Abstract

Purpose

Local adaptations to economic blight and overreliance on the tourism industry demonstrate significant aspects of resilience and risk among Caribbean populations. Those individuals who choose sex tourism as a way to benefit from its increasing revenue demonstrate resilience through their adaptations to shifts in the local and national economies, including national debt, expansion of the all-inclusive hotel industry, and seasonal variations in tourist arrivals. Based on ethnographic research conducted in Negril, Jamaica, I argue that the very activities of “hustling” and sex work that illustrate local men’s resilience are the same practices that put their sexual health at risk.

Methodology/approach

This research contextualizes the practice of female sex tourism using the anthropology of tourism, gender and sexuality studies, and the anthropology of HIV/AIDS with a focus on the Caribbean region. This work is based on a project that entailed nine months of fieldwork in 2010–2011 in Negril where I conducted ethnographic observations, life history interviews with three men who sell sex, and 54 semi-structured interviews.

Findings

Men who sell sex to women tourists demonstrate resilience in the face of economic shifts and changing cultural norms. These men are also, however, exposed to risk through their sexual activities and health seeking behaviors.

Research implications

In order for the issues of STI/HIV risk to be adequately addressed among this population, effective public health efforts must prioritize health over tourism revenue and utilize anthropological approaches to explore the health costs of the tourist dollar.

Details

Anthropological Considerations of Production, Exchange, Vending and Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-194-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1933

THE article which we publish from the pen of Mr. L. Stanley Jast is the first of many which we hope will come from his pen, now that he has release from regular library…

Abstract

THE article which we publish from the pen of Mr. L. Stanley Jast is the first of many which we hope will come from his pen, now that he has release from regular library duties. Anything that Mr. Jast has to say is said with originality even if the subject is not original; his quality has always been to give an independent and novel twist to almost everything he touches. We think our readers will find this to be so when he touches the important question of “The Library and Leisure.”

Details

New Library World, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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