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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2022

Andrew Cardow

The purpose of this paper is an archival study of images taken from cruise brochures available in New Zealand from the late twentieth century and early twenty-first…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is an archival study of images taken from cruise brochures available in New Zealand from the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. The investigation adds to previous work undertaken on cruise ship posters and to the discussion surrounding how cruise lines motivated customers to purchase a cruise.

Design/methodology/approach

An archival approach was taken. The aim of the research is to explain how images used in the brochures have their origin in the mid-twentieth century concept of motivational research. In doing so, the work of Veblen (1899), Lazarsfeld (1935) and Packard (1957, 1959) are used as a foundation to illustrate how more recent commentators, such as Gad (2016) and Jamieson (1983), can be evoked.

Findings

Analysis of the images presented builds upon previous work done on cruise ship posters. Previous examinations used mid-twentieth century posters to show how the ship was slowly being eroded. The current work illustrates how the brochure evolved to entice consumers to purchase. Analysis of the images suggests that motivational theory is alive and well within the cruise industry.

Research limitations/implications

This study is constructed around the archival holding of the National Maritime Museum of New Zealand. As such, the study does not include information that does not form part of this holding.

Practical implications

New Zealand underwent large structural, economic and social change between 1984 and 2000. During that time, there was growth of income inequity. This provided some with greater disposable income for leisure and travel. While the following survey concerns cruise ship brochures, an examination of airline, resort and hotel advertising may be worthy of a companion study.

Originality/value

The cruise ship brochure available to New Zealand customers in the last quarter of the twentieth century demonstrated the ship is not centre stage. In this regard, the following work adds to previous work conducted using posters and an understanding of the evolution of cruise ship advertising in emergent modern markets.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 December 2021

Patricia Loga, Andrew Cardow and Andy Asquith

Violent geo-political conflicts are on the rise across the globe, particularly within fragile states. Using path-dependency theory, this paper aims to explore Fiji in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Violent geo-political conflicts are on the rise across the globe, particularly within fragile states. Using path-dependency theory, this paper aims to explore Fiji in the context of its public administrative history examining the legacies of history that have contributed to its ongoing conflicts.

Design/methodology/approach

An archival document analysis along with a theoretical thematic analysis was used to collect and assess data. Themes were identified that explain how and when the conflict became path-dependent.

Findings

Analysing conflict as path-dependent demonstrates how indirect rule while Fiji was under colonial rule, and the short time it has taken for the nation to transition from a colony to an independent State contributed to the eruption of conflicts in Fiji.

Originality/value

The research makes two key contributions, namely, it develops a theoretical understanding of conflict using path-dependency theory and it uncovers legacies of colonialism that have shaped conflict in Fiji.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Andrew Cardow and William Robert Wilson

This paper aims to highlight the reasons for the establishment of savings banks in New Zealand, with a primary thesis being that savings banks in New Zealand were intended…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the reasons for the establishment of savings banks in New Zealand, with a primary thesis being that savings banks in New Zealand were intended to operate in a similar way to those in the UK. That is, to provide banking services to the working classes and supply revenue to a cash-strapped government. Savings banks were reasonably successful in meeting the needs of their depositors but provided little revenue to the government. This gives rise to a secondary thesis that, when the Government was presented with the opportunity to establish the Post Office Savings Bank (POSB), they did so with revenue in mind.

Design/methodology/approach

Contemporaneous scholarly discussion along with newspaper, primary sourced bank and government archives builds an interpretation of why savings banks were established in New Zealand. This interpretation is presented in the form of a narrative, which tells the story of the rise of private savings banks in New Zealand and their eventual stagnation when the POSB was introduced.

Findings

Savings banks in New Zealand were initiated by Governor Grey primarily to provide an alternative source of development funding. New Zealand savings banks, initially modelled on UK and New South Wales variants, also appear to have been designed to meet the needs of the working classes, with deposits limited to £50 a year and a maximum balance set of £100 in total. However, as the requirement to invest in Government debt was removed from their founding legislation, they mainly provided mortgages to their local communities. To some extent, this situation was remedied in 1867 when the POSB was established, as it was required to invest as directed by the Government.

Originality/value

The narrative highlights the importance of savings banks and the POSB to both the people and government of New Zealand. This research adds to the discussion surrounding the purpose of savings banks and details the contributions made by both savings banks and the POSB in colonial New Zealand. As previous publications were in the main commissioned by various savings banks, this work provides an independent academic analysis of the first savings banks in colonial New Zealand in the period from the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840 until New Zealand became a dominion in 1907.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Peter Wiltshier and Andrew Cardow

The purpose of this paper is to highlight indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and…

772

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and fervency attributable to local power elites and local collaboration and cooperation.

Design/methodology/approach

The twenty‐first century identifies good practices in many aspects of bottom‐up planning and implementation in neoliberal political economies. New Zealand is for many reasons, due to scale, skills and education, an example of endogenous development that is used globally for best practice studies. This paper specifically identifies and explores the local responses to the challenge of democracy and opportunities for diversification through tourism services provision on the Chatham Islands.

Findings

The paper notes that community capacity and governance on the Chathams has been the subject of discussion in recent years and the focus has been directed to conflicts in governance and possibly inappropriate policy and practice coordination. Although the refocus on endogenous development, empowerment and devolution of responsibility has a long pedigree in the context of the neoliberal economy, insufficient attention has been paid to the skills, inclination, social and economic capital for indigenous enterprise, more so in an environment of isolation, relative deprivation and dependence.

Originality/value

This paper highlights indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and fervency attributable to local power elites and local collaboration and cooperation. A useful model of indigenous tourism development and its endogenous antecedents is considered at the conclusion.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Bradley Bowden

268

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Andrew Cardow, David Tripe and William Wilson

This paper aims to argue that in the short history of New Zealand banking, political experimentation, based at first upon socialist ideology of the 1940s led to the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to argue that in the short history of New Zealand banking, political experimentation, based at first upon socialist ideology of the 1940s led to the nationalisation of The Bank of New Zealand (BNZ), followed by a period of neo‐liberalism in the 1980s and early 1990s in which the bank was privatised. It further argues that the establishment of Kiwibank Ltd in New Zealand at the dawn of the twenty‐first century was a return to the political ideology of the 1940s.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the nationalisation and subsequent privatisation of the BNZ and draws a parallel between the perceived banking environment as it existed in New Zealand in the twentieth century and as it existed at the establishment of Kiwibank. By way of context setting it also discusses the political environment as it relates to the nationalisation of the Bank of England.

Findings

The paper finds that in New Zealand, political experimentation, not commercial pragmatism, was the underlying motivating factor for the state's involvement in banking.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the pool of knowledge regarding the political motivations behind nationalisation and state ownership of banking assets. The article is of interest to economic and political historians as well as those who study New Zealand political party history. Future policy makers could do well to reflect upon the motivations for state ownership of banking assets by asking if their decisions are driven by ideology or economics.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

468

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 January 2023

Bradley Bowden

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Bradley Bowden

248

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2022

Jeff Muldoon and Bradley Bowden

135

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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