Search results

1 – 10 of 11
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Andrew Cardow and William Robert Wilson

This paper aims to highlight the reasons for the establishment of savings banks in New Zealand, with a primary thesis being that savings banks in New Zealand were intended…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the reasons for the establishment of savings banks in New Zealand, with a primary thesis being that savings banks in New Zealand were intended to operate in a similar way to those in the UK. That is, to provide banking services to the working classes and supply revenue to a cash-strapped government. Savings banks were reasonably successful in meeting the needs of their depositors but provided little revenue to the government. This gives rise to a secondary thesis that, when the Government was presented with the opportunity to establish the Post Office Savings Bank (POSB), they did so with revenue in mind.

Design/methodology/approach

Contemporaneous scholarly discussion along with newspaper, primary sourced bank and government archives builds an interpretation of why savings banks were established in New Zealand. This interpretation is presented in the form of a narrative, which tells the story of the rise of private savings banks in New Zealand and their eventual stagnation when the POSB was introduced.

Findings

Savings banks in New Zealand were initiated by Governor Grey primarily to provide an alternative source of development funding. New Zealand savings banks, initially modelled on UK and New South Wales variants, also appear to have been designed to meet the needs of the working classes, with deposits limited to £50 a year and a maximum balance set of £100 in total. However, as the requirement to invest in Government debt was removed from their founding legislation, they mainly provided mortgages to their local communities. To some extent, this situation was remedied in 1867 when the POSB was established, as it was required to invest as directed by the Government.

Originality/value

The narrative highlights the importance of savings banks and the POSB to both the people and government of New Zealand. This research adds to the discussion surrounding the purpose of savings banks and details the contributions made by both savings banks and the POSB in colonial New Zealand. As previous publications were in the main commissioned by various savings banks, this work provides an independent academic analysis of the first savings banks in colonial New Zealand in the period from the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840 until New Zealand became a dominion in 1907.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Peter Wiltshier and Andrew Cardow

The purpose of this paper is to highlight indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and…

Downloads
759

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and fervency attributable to local power elites and local collaboration and cooperation.

Design/methodology/approach

The twenty‐first century identifies good practices in many aspects of bottom‐up planning and implementation in neoliberal political economies. New Zealand is for many reasons, due to scale, skills and education, an example of endogenous development that is used globally for best practice studies. This paper specifically identifies and explores the local responses to the challenge of democracy and opportunities for diversification through tourism services provision on the Chatham Islands.

Findings

The paper notes that community capacity and governance on the Chathams has been the subject of discussion in recent years and the focus has been directed to conflicts in governance and possibly inappropriate policy and practice coordination. Although the refocus on endogenous development, empowerment and devolution of responsibility has a long pedigree in the context of the neoliberal economy, insufficient attention has been paid to the skills, inclination, social and economic capital for indigenous enterprise, more so in an environment of isolation, relative deprivation and dependence.

Originality/value

This paper highlights indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and fervency attributable to local power elites and local collaboration and cooperation. A useful model of indigenous tourism development and its endogenous antecedents is considered at the conclusion.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 March 2016

Anjali Chaudhry, Ling Yuan, Jia Hu and Robert A. Cooke

Writings on organizational culture suggest that cultural values and norms are influenced by factors at the organizational, industry, and societal levels. While the effects…

Downloads
2921

Abstract

Purpose

Writings on organizational culture suggest that cultural values and norms are influenced by factors at the organizational, industry, and societal levels. While the effects of societal and organizational factors have been researched extensively, those of industry factors have not received commensurate attention. This paper investigates the relative importance of industry versus organizational variables in explaining the cultural norms reported by individuals within organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The effects of two industry characteristics, (growth rate and research and development intensity) and two sets of organizational factors (leadership behaviors and human resource practices) on the strength of constructive, passive/defensive, and aggressive/defensive organizational cultural norms were investigated.

Findings

Results of hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analysis of survey data from 3245 respondents in 424 organizations in twelve different industries revealed significant between-organization variation but no significant between-industry variation in the three types of cultural norms measured. Furthermore, while industry-level factors were unrelated to culture, significant variance in the culture measures was explained by leadership behaviors and human resource practices (use of rewards and fairness of performance appraisal).

Research limitations/implications

The strength of cultural norms and expectations within an organization evolve in response to attributes specific to the organization and do not necessarily reflect industry characteristics. The results indicate that organizations using surveys to assess their cultures may learn as much (if not more) by comparing their feedback to data on organizations across a spectrum of industries as opposed to organizations exclusively in their own industry.

Originality/value

Most of the frameworks developed to examine and describe the cultures of organizations delineate specific dimensions or types that are assumed to be relevant to all organizations regardless of the industries within which they operate. The purpose of this paper was to explore the validity of this assumption by investigating the relative impact of industry and organizational factors on organizational culture.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 March 2016

Panagiotis Gkorezis and Victoria Bellou

The detrimental effect of workplace ostracism on core employee and organizational outcomes has received increasing attention. However, very little is known about its…

Downloads
1582

Abstract

Purpose

The detrimental effect of workplace ostracism on core employee and organizational outcomes has received increasing attention. However, very little is known about its impact on group related outcomes. Given that workplace relationships play a salient role in enhancing employee willingness to share information and knowledge, the present paper examines the link between workplace ostracism and information exchange. In doing so, we also highlight the mediating role of a novel construct, namely self-serving behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

To test our hypotheses, we conducted two studies using both a scenario paradigm (54 students) and a field study (172 working adults).

Findings

Results indicated that self-serving behavior fully mediates the effect of workplace ostracism on employee information exchange.

Research limitations/implications

Both studies have limitations that need to be considered. The scenario paradigm lacks realism whereas the cross-sectional nature of our survey cannot infer causality. As regards the latter, data were collected using a single source and thus common method variance may exist.

Originality/value

The present study provides novel insights into the outcomes of workplace ostracism and the underlying mechanisms that account for its negative effect. Moreover, it adds to limited current knowledge on self-serving behavior.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Bradley Bowden

Downloads
243

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Andrew Cardow, David Tripe and William Wilson

This paper aims to argue that in the short history of New Zealand banking, political experimentation, based at first upon socialist ideology of the 1940s led to the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to argue that in the short history of New Zealand banking, political experimentation, based at first upon socialist ideology of the 1940s led to the nationalisation of The Bank of New Zealand (BNZ), followed by a period of neo‐liberalism in the 1980s and early 1990s in which the bank was privatised. It further argues that the establishment of Kiwibank Ltd in New Zealand at the dawn of the twenty‐first century was a return to the political ideology of the 1940s.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the nationalisation and subsequent privatisation of the BNZ and draws a parallel between the perceived banking environment as it existed in New Zealand in the twentieth century and as it existed at the establishment of Kiwibank. By way of context setting it also discusses the political environment as it relates to the nationalisation of the Bank of England.

Findings

The paper finds that in New Zealand, political experimentation, not commercial pragmatism, was the underlying motivating factor for the state's involvement in banking.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the pool of knowledge regarding the political motivations behind nationalisation and state ownership of banking assets. The article is of interest to economic and political historians as well as those who study New Zealand political party history. Future policy makers could do well to reflect upon the motivations for state ownership of banking assets by asking if their decisions are driven by ideology or economics.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Downloads
467

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Bradley Bowden

Downloads
215

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 February 2019

Bradley Bowden

Downloads
215

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 August 2020

Bradley Bowden

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

1 – 10 of 11