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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2020

Francisco Layrisse, Ezequiel Reficco and Andrés Barrios

The purpose of this study is to identify how the value dynamics of the freemium business model (BM) play out in a social enterprise.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify how the value dynamics of the freemium business model (BM) play out in a social enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

We draw on a multiple case study of two social enterprises –one nonprofit (Aravind Eyecare) in Asia and one for-profit in Latin America (Biodent)– to analyze the implications of applying the value architecture of a freemium BM to social enterprises.

Findings

The freemium BM departs from standard practice when applied in social enterprises. Meaningful differences include the feasibility/desirability of converting free users to paying ones, the presence of significant variable costs –which requires balancing the ratio of free and paying customers– and the use of nontraditional pricing schemes to enhance value capture. The social freemium BM can increase scalability, value creation and value capture. Under this model, “beneficiaries” can be more than passive recipients of value and contribute to a venture's success in various ways –such as lowering its operational costs or enhancing its value proposition toward third parties.

Originality/value

While in the past years commercial enterprises have been disrupted by the emergence of freemium platforms, the social enterprise field has barely taken notice. We extract lessons and implications from this paradigmatic change for the theory and practice of business model innovation in social enterprises, of particular relevance to Latin America, where social and environmental disequilibria remain a recurring feat.

Propósito

Identificar cómo el modelo de negocio freemium impacta el desarrollo de un emprendimiento social.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

realizamos un estudio de caso múltiple de dos emprendimientos sociales –uno sin fines de lucro (Aravind Eyecare) ubicada en Asia y el otro con fines de lucro ubicada en América Latina (Biodent)– para analizar las dinámicas qué genera el modelo de negocio freemium en la arquitectura de valor de los emprendimientos sociales.

Hallazgos

Cuando el modelo freemium se aplica a un emprendimiento social, surgen diferencias respecto de la práctica estándar en empresas comerciales. Estas diferencias incluyen la viabilidad/conveniencia de convertir a los usuarios gratuitos en clientes de pago, la presencia de costos variables significativos –que imponen la necesidad de equilibrar la proporción de usuarios gratuitos y clientes de pago– y el uso de esquemas de precios no tradicionales para mejorar la captura de valor. El modelo freemium social puede contribuir a facilitar la escalabilidad, así como la creación y captura de valor de un emprendimiento social. Bajo este modelo, los “beneficiarios” pueden ser más qué receptores pasivos de valor y contribuir al éxito de la empresa de diversas formas –por ejemplo, reduciendo sus costos operativos o mejorando su propuesta de valor.

Originalidad/valor

En las últimas dos décadas, varias industrias sufrieron grandes disrupciones por el surgimiento de modelos de negocio basados en plataformas, como el freemium. Sin embargo, hasta ahora el campo del emprendimiento social parecía no haber tomado nota de este cambio paradigmático. En este artículo, extraemos lecciones e implicaciones de este cambio para la teoría y la práctica de los emprendimientos sociales. Nuestros hallazgos son particularmente relevantes para América Latina, en donde subsisten profundos déficits socio-ambientales.

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2019

Andres Barrios, Ezequiel Reficco and Rodrigo Taborda

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which hope and perceived goal attainment can be developed in subsistence entrepreneurs through the right training tools.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which hope and perceived goal attainment can be developed in subsistence entrepreneurs through the right training tools.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal study of a subsistence entrepreneurship training program in three Central American countries was carried out. Participants were divided on the basis of their exposure to training (yes, no), and of the type of training received (none, business plan, business model). The authors carried out three assessments (just before the program, six months and one year after the program) of participants’ business goals and their hope of attaining them. Information was analyzed using linear regression.

Findings

Participants exposed to training reported significant increases in perceived goal attainment and in their hope levels. Training based on the business plan affected hope agency in the short term, as predicted by the logic of causation theory. Training based on the business canvas affected hope pathways, as predicted by the logic of effectuation theory.

Research limitations/implications

Given the data collection process (a non-random sample and selection of participants), the findings are not generalizable without stringent procedures and further replication.

Practical implications

If hope is a reliable predictor of goal attainment, it should be promoted and measured. Given the limited means of gathering data and making reliable projections that most entrepreneurs endure, the business canvas’ contribution to entrepreneurs’ “emotional equipment” ceteris paribus should be more valuable for subsistence entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

This is the first study comparing the short- and long-term effects of two entrepreneurial learning devices on entrepreneurs’ hope and business goal attainment.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Andrés Barrios, Maria G. Piacentini and Laura Salciuviene

Purpose – By analysing the experience of homelessness, this chapter aims to understand how individuals experience involuntary life changes in uncertain contexts and…

Abstract

Purpose – By analysing the experience of homelessness, this chapter aims to understand how individuals experience involuntary life changes in uncertain contexts and analyses the role of consumption, in terms of possessions and practices, along the process.

Methodology/approach – This study adopts a phenomenological approach, focusing on the homelessness experience. It involves an 18 month quasi-ethnography study in a charity that supports the homeless individuals, where interviews about their retrospective biographical accounts were performed. The data was analysed using existential phenomenological procedures.

Findings – Informants’ pathways to homelessness reveal a four-stage process of forced self-transformation (initial self, forced negotiation, transition, transformed self) which takes place across two stressful situational contexts: the triggering events for transformation (i.e. that led informants to lose their home) and the persisting state of uncertainty (i.e. further survival living in the streets).

Social implications – In the current postmodern times there is greater uncertainty surrounding individuals’ life changes. The consequences of the current economic crisis have threatened individuals to lose their homes. By having a better understanding of the way individuals experience this type of loss, the study brings new information about how to support them.

Originality/value of chapter – This study highlights contexts where Van Gennep's transformational routine may not be suitable in the current postmodern times, and provides an alternative transformational routine that takes into account the uncertainty that accompanies involuntary transformations.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-022-2

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Abstract

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-022-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2019

Beatriz Maturana, Anthony McInneny and Marcelo Bravo

Within Santiago, Chile's capital city, Barrio is a fundamental urban concept: an identity of place that defines a social space more than the territorial boundary of a…

Abstract

Within Santiago, Chile's capital city, Barrio is a fundamental urban concept: an identity of place that defines a social space more than the territorial boundary of a designated area. Nearly 30 years of sustained, economic growth have positioned Chile, and Santiago with 40% of the country's population, as a tourist, financial and investment centre for South America. After a general decline of the inner-city area during the time of dictatorship (1973-1990), three inner-city residential barrios are being re-defined by their social and urban heritage as part of the “coolest” city of South America. These residential barrios possess the social characteristics of an urban unit within the concept of an ethical city—autonomy, conviviality, connectivity and diversity—and, in form and use, the basis of urban cultural tourism, a living heritage of residential architecture, public space and urban culture. The spatial and economic transformation of these barrios shifts the existing dynamic between the residents' social capital and the barrios' symbolic capital to the question of whose rights and interest should prevail. Through a literature review, policy review and an analysis of morphology and land use of three barrios, this article draws lessons to assist a re-thinking of the development of this urban, social-spatial unit of Chilean cities.

Details

Open House International, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2015

Andrés Bernasconi

Access and inclusion in higher education present different problems to highly selective universities, and to unselective, demand-absorbing colleges. Also, the public…

Abstract

Access and inclusion in higher education present different problems to highly selective universities, and to unselective, demand-absorbing colleges. Also, the public policy perspective of the government has its own goals and concerns. This paper examines these differences in the case of Chile. Elite institutions face a problem they interpret as a loss of diversity due to the increasing gentrification of their student body. In the other segment of universities, students ready to work at a college level without support are a minority, and institutions attempt to change the profile of their student body through remedial courses and other palliative measures.

Details

Mitigating Inequality: Higher Education Research, Policy, and Practice in an Era of Massification and Stratification
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-291-7

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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2007

Gregory Wilpert

This paper explores the sociological, economic, and political reasons for the collapse of Venezuela's 40-year “pacted” democracy, the eight-year conflict between the…

Abstract

This paper explores the sociological, economic, and political reasons for the collapse of Venezuela's 40-year “pacted” democracy, the eight-year conflict between the country's new president and the opposition, where this conflict has led Venezuela, and what its prospects are for the near future. It proposes that the collapse of Venezuela's “ancien regime” can best be understood by an examination of the impact the rise and fall of oil prices had on its economy, society, and polity. A 20-year economic decline led to the election of Hugo Chavez, a radical outsider, who refused to play along with the country's old political class. This class, in turn, refused to accept Chavez as the legitimately elected president and launched the country on an eight-year roller-coaster ride of counter-revolution and radicalization, which recently ended with the reelection of Chavez and a massive popular endorsement for the establishment of “21st century socialism” in Venezuela. Exactly what such a project means is still unclear, but it so far involves state support for self-managed workplaces and an anti-capitalist and participatory democratic state in the midst of a still functioning capitalist economy. With the apparent defeat of obstacles that are external to the Bolivarian movement, as the pro-Chavez movement is called, such as the domestic opposition and U.S. intervention, the movement is now forced to confront its internal obstacles, such as clientelism, corruption, and personalism, if it is to succeed in the long run.

Details

Transitions in Latin America and in Poland and Syria
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-469-0

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Beatriz Cuadrado-Ballesteros and Luis Andrés Vaquero-Cacho

This paper aims to analyse the level of informative transparency among Spanish political parties and political foundations, according to general and descriptive…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the level of informative transparency among Spanish political parties and political foundations, according to general and descriptive information (e.g. contact, ideas and values, electoral programmes, members, etc.) and economic, governance and financial information.

Design/methodology/approach

The situation of the parties in each year is represented by a biplot, which is a graphical representation of a multivariate sample. The data for this analysis were obtained from the reports published by Fundación Compromiso y Transparencia (Foundation for Integrity and Transparency) for 2011 and 2012.

Findings

This paper evidences the existence of serious problems of opacity, especially in relation to financial information (balance sheet, income statement, annual accounts and audit report) and information on the fulfilment of goals and programmes (management report and compliance report).

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to analyse statistically the level of transparency of political parties and foundations, showing the need for a robust control system and for mechanisms to penalise conduct that limits citizens’ access to public information.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Gracia Rubio Martín, Conrado Miguel Manuel García, Ángel Rodríguez-López and Francisco José Gonzalez Sanchez

This research proposes analytical valuation models throughout football players' life cycles based on crowd valuations from social media to produce dynamic sporting human…

Abstract

Purpose

This research proposes analytical valuation models throughout football players' life cycles based on crowd valuations from social media to produce dynamic sporting human capital disclosures, and therefore, supplying further useful information to capture the intellectual capital (IC) of football clubs.

Design/methodology/approach

This work is carried out using an econometric model that includes 658 observations of crowd judgments versus their transfer fees, for the best footballers of the three major European Leagues between 2006 and 2018. To make the model more parsimonious, the set of independent variables that really add value has been found across the stepwise methodology.

Findings

The significant differences between both models are analyzed, integrating previous academic literature based on the existence of negotiation elements in prices, and in the capacity of crowdsourcing to explain assessments of football players, from a dynamic perspective, alongside a new variable: injuries, which has not been explained before.

Originality/value

The broader assessments from crowdsourcing should be integrated in intellectual capital disclosures (ICD), from a critical, novel and dynamic perspective, creating a virtuous cycle between managers and fans, to increase transparency of financial information for stakeholders and society.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Pedro Garcia-del-Barrio and Francesc Pujol

The main goal of this paper is to evaluate the players' contribution and economic value in the soccer industry. Media visibility records provide us with comparable metrics…

Abstract

Purpose

The main goal of this paper is to evaluate the players' contribution and economic value in the soccer industry. Media visibility records provide us with comparable metrics to identify talent and make hiring decisions – these records can jointly capture sport (on-field) skills and other attractive (off-field) abilities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a valuation method that applies media visibility appraisals to estimate “theoretical values” of the transfer fees paid for hiring soccer players. The estimations are performed by analysing the evolution over time of the media exposure of about 5,000 individuals of more than 200 clubs.

Findings

The study’s empirical results reveal that, along with sport performance, the players' media status also affects their economic valuation, which explains why the clubs – in search of greater economic returns – fiercely compete for the most popular players. The paper also identifies the main factors determining the players' economic value. In predicting the players' transfer fees, some variables are statistically significant: individual media visibility, media visibility share of the player within his team, contract duration, status of the hiring team, years of experience, player's age at the end of the contract and the domestic league of the hiring team.

Originality/value

Professional sports provide reliable measures on individuals' performance that may help in the hiring process of workers. This paper identifies gifted soccer players while taking into account their skills as media leaders and the economic implications. Insofar as players' talents determine their teams' sport and economic achievements, the transfer fees paid for players must then be seen as a crucial factor. Measuring individual talent and being able to translate this talent into productivity levels entail serious methodological and empirical challenges.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 47 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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