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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2022

Hendy Mustiko Aji and Istyakara Muslichah

The purpose of this study is to examine the antecedents and consequences of halal brand personality in the hospital industry by comparing Muslim and non-Muslim Islamic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the antecedents and consequences of halal brand personality in the hospital industry by comparing Muslim and non-Muslim Islamic hospital visitors.

Design/methodology/approach

Online questionnaires were distributed to 113 Muslim and 100 non-Muslim Islamic hospital visitors using a purposive proportional sampling technique. The structural equation modelling (SEM) method was used, which is appropriate for complex model testing. SEM was used for both the second-order model and multigroup analysis to compare Muslim and non-Muslim visitors.

Findings

Self-expressive value was significantly affected by halal brand personality. Self-expressive value was a direct antecedent of brand tribalism, which affects brand loyalty. Brand tribalism positively affected brand loyalty. No differences between Muslim and non-Muslim visitors were found, indicating that halal is a universal concept, particularly in the hospital brand personality context.

Practical implications

Islamic hospital marketing managers should empower visitors to build strong brand advocacy. These strategies may lead to new hospital visitors and can be achieved by creating user-generated content distributed via social media. User-generated content is a powerful form of brand advocacy, as non-customers do not view it as marketing.

Originality/value

This study provides insightful empirical contributions to brand literature by showing that halal is a universal and inclusive concept, relatively accepted by consumers regardless of their religious background. This study also offers managerial insights for hospital policymakers in developing strategic programs to strengthen Islamic hospitals' halal brand personalities.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Santina Bertone and Sanjeev Abeynayake

(1) Critically analyze the role of diversity and inclusion practitioners and the legal/policy framework for managing diversity and inclusion in Australia. (2) Propose…

Abstract

Aims

(1) Critically analyze the role of diversity and inclusion practitioners and the legal/policy framework for managing diversity and inclusion in Australia. (2) Propose enhanced framework to improve outcomes for disadvantaged groups in the workforce.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Review of international and Australian literature, overview of gains and continuing gaps for disadvantaged groups, and consideration of the features of work health and safety (Robens-style) legislation that could be adapted to the diversity and inclusion jurisdiction.

Findings

The role of diversity and inclusion practitioner is often transient and fragmented, offering a limited base to advance the diversity and inclusion cause. Based on indicators, much more work is required to achieve full diversity and inclusion. A stronger legislative/policy framework is needed to increase the effectiveness and longevity of the diversity and inclusion practitioner role, spread responsibility, and achieve improved outcomes.

Research Limitations

A lack of qualitative data from workplaces to augment our understanding of the challenges encountered by diversity and inclusion practitioners. To date, there has been no opportunity to test the feasibility of Robens-style legislation/policy in this area.

Practical Implications

Opportunity to develop a fully worked proposal for legislative/policy reform to present to the government, employers, professional associations, trade unions, and representatives of disadvantaged groups.

Social Implications

Reforms could have far-reaching implications for the regulation and administration of diversity and inclusion practice in Australia

Originality

Critical review of the diversity and inclusion practitioner role and associated legislation/policy in Australia and consideration of an alternative framework for diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Krishna Kisten Govender

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact on consumer behaviour/brand choice resulting in the relocation of communities from informal to formal settlements.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact on consumer behaviour/brand choice resulting in the relocation of communities from informal to formal settlements.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey conducted among a probability sample of 384 consumers comprising different “socio-income” groups, who were relocated from informal settlements as well as others who relocated voluntarily to Cosmo City, a state designed residential development, to explore their brand choice behaviour.

Findings

It was ascertained that households switch brands if the degree of social change is greater than the perceived strength of the current brand, and an improvement in the space or house size which impacted their lifestyle. There is also a significant relationship between the product format and brand switching; between brand choice and change in the place and type of residence.

Research limitations/implications

It is evident that residential location, changes in social positions, inclusive of place of residence, lifestyle changes, and functional benefits, are essential factors for consideration in the development of a coherent brand strategy that seeks to adequately address the toilet-care product brand needs of consumers in the new democratic South Africa.

Practical implications

Marketers have to move beyond simple demographics and use multifaceted approaches to understanding brand switching behaviour, because consumers adapt quickly to changes in the market. Marketers also need to be cognisant of the rapid changes in consumers’ perception of their lifestyle change, and how they (consumers) relate to these changes.

Social implications

The relocation was viewed as a “social disruption” which in this study was the “relocation” which changed the place of and type of dwelling/home ownership type. Marketers also need to be cognisant of the rapid changes in consumers’ perception of their lifestyle change, and how they (consumers) relate to these changes.

Originality/value

The concept of social disruption in the form or relocated customers has not been studied in South Africa, especially with respect to the impact on brand choice of toilet cleaning products.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2022

Lizardo Vargas-Bianchi

Much research has been conducted on how consumption is related to human relationships. Only a scarcity of studies has examined brand and product selection, as well as the…

Abstract

Purpose

Much research has been conducted on how consumption is related to human relationships. Only a scarcity of studies has examined brand and product selection, as well as the consumption activities that individuals follow when pursuing a sense of group belonging. The literature comprises a single theoretical framework describing this phenomenon, a nascent proposition on which further research remains undeveloped. This study aims to examine the transferability of that theoretical framework in a different context to that used for its elaboration and its descriptive scope on purchasing goods and engaging in consumption activities to leverage belonging.

Design/methodology/approach

A deductive qualitative case study and pattern matching analysis technique were used, followed by structural coding analysis of interview data.

Findings

Findings reveal that the model is transferable, although its conceptual scope faces limitations. Individuals follow paths that need little or no excessive calculation in identifying a group to which they desire to belong, or the conduits to do so, and in certain cases the sense of belonging mediated by consumption is independent of display and confirmation by others. A refinement of the studied theoretical framework was carried out based on the findings, proposing an alternative framework termed the belonging-oriented consumption model, which provides a basis for future research on consumption related to pursuing a sense of belonging.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to analysing those events in which consumption for the purpose of pursuing group belonging is intentional. However, much of our consumption happens in a nuanced and unreflective way, and the same must go for consumption related to belonging.

Practical implications

The symbolic meaning that consumers attach to products and brands can vary based on how they are used and how consumers pursue a sense of belonging. The personality and distinctiveness of a product is influenced by the relationship between individuals and its use. Managers can establish concepts and elements of brand identity that ease brand display as a sign of belonging. They can also promote brand salience when the brand is used as a belonging conduit.

Originality/value

This study is significant because there is limited development in the academic literature, nor agreement among the authors, of a model that describes the components of consumption oriented towards pursuing a sense of group belonging. The author proposes the belonging-oriented consumption model, which provides a theoretical basis for future research on this topic.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 February 2020

Henry Boateng, John Paul Kosiba, Diyawu Rahman Adam, Kwame Simpe Ofori and Abednego Feehi Okoe

This study aimed to ascertain the relationship between experiential value, brand attachment and brand loyalty. The authors employed the attachment theory as the…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to ascertain the relationship between experiential value, brand attachment and brand loyalty. The authors employed the attachment theory as the theoretical framework and operationalised attachment as a two-dimensional construct: identity-based and bonding-based. The authors argue that experiential value reinforces customer attachment in these two perspectives of attachment and consequently determine brand loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a survey research design and collected data from 500 customers of mobile telecommunication network companies in Ghana. The authors analysed the data collected using the partial least squares approach to structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings of the study showed that there is a relationship between experiential value, brand attachment (identity-based and bonding-based) and brand loyalty. This study showed how experiential value reinforces each dimension of the attachment theory, and drives brand loyalty.

Originality/value

This study intensifies the application of attachment theory in the marketing literature. It provides insight into how brand loyalty is developed via attachment.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2015

Lorna Ruane and Elaine Wallace

This study aims to examine the relationship between social influence and consumers’ self-expression through brands. It considers susceptibility to interpersonal influence…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between social influence and consumers’ self-expression through brands. It considers susceptibility to interpersonal influence and social network influence on self-expressive brands and brand tribalism. The study examines whether self-expressive brands and brand tribalism influence brand loyalty and word of mouth (WOM).

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional online survey was carried out with members of Generation Y in Ireland. Data from 675 complete responses were analysed using SPSS 20 and AMOS 20. A structural model tested nine hypothesised relationships.

Findings

Findings indicate that both online social network influence and susceptibility to interpersonal influence are antecedents of tribalism and self-expressive brands. Consumers of self-expressive brands are loyal and offer positive WOM. By contrast, those who seek tribal membership have less brand loyalty and offer less WOM than other consumers. Findings suggest that consumers may be loyal to tribes, rather than to brands. This informs our understanding of the role of tribes for consumers and brand outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to Generation Y consumers within Ireland.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore the effect of consumers’ perceptions about online social network influence on brand tribalism. In addition, their views about the influence of the social network on self-expressive brand consumption, and brand outcomes, are identified. This paper highlights consumers’ susceptibility to interpersonal influence on their brand choices and brand tribalism. In addition, it is shown that brand loyalty and WOM are not always a consequence of tribal membership. By contrast, self-expressive brand consumption enhances brand WOM and brand loyalty.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Carolin Siepmann, Lisa Carola Holthoff and Pascal Kowalczuk

As luxury goods are losing their importance for demonstrating status, wealth or power to others, individuals are searching for alternative status symbols. Recently…

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Abstract

Purpose

As luxury goods are losing their importance for demonstrating status, wealth or power to others, individuals are searching for alternative status symbols. Recently, individuals have increasingly used conspicuous consumption and displays of experiences on social media to obtain affirmation. This study aims to analyze the effects of luxury and nonluxury experiences, as well as traditional luxury goods on status- and nonstatus-related dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

After presenting the theoretical foundation, the authors conduct a study with 599 participants to compare status perceptions elicited by the conspicuous consumption of luxury goods, luxury experiences and nonluxury experiences. The authors investigate whether experiences that are visibly consumed on Instagram are replacing traditional luxury goods as the most important status symbols. Furthermore, the authors examine the effects of the content shown on nonstatus-related dimensions and analyze whether status perceptions differ between female and male social media communicators. Finally, the authors analyze how personal characteristics (self-esteem, self-actualization and materialism) influence the status perceptions of others on social media.

Findings

The results show that luxury goods are still the most important means of displaying status. However, especially for women, luxury experiences are also associated with a high level of social status. Thus, the results imply important gender differences in the perceptions of status- and nonstatus-related dimensions. Furthermore, the findings indicate that, in particular, the individual characteristics of self-actualization and materialism affect status perceptions depending on the posted content.

Originality/value

While the research has already considered some alternative forms of conspicuous consumption, little attention has been given to experiences as status symbols. However, with their growing importance as substitutes for luxury goods and the rise of social media, the desire to conspicuously consume experiences is increasing. The authors address this gap in the literature by focusing on the conspicuous display of luxury and nonluxury experiences on social media.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Pradeep Kautish, Arpita Khare and Rajesh Sharma

This paper aims to examine the relationships among two distinct yet interconnected forms of value orientations, namely, terminal and instrumental values, brand…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationships among two distinct yet interconnected forms of value orientations, namely, terminal and instrumental values, brand consciousness and behavioral intentions. This study validated the conceptual model for branded fashion apparel consumption in an emerging market, e.g. India.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design followed a two-step approach to test the measurement and structural models for partial least squares structural equation modeling with SmartPLS (v.3.0) as recommended by Anderson and Gerbing (1988).

Findings

The results illustrated that both the instrumental and terminal values influence brand consciousness and, consequently, brand consciousness had an impact on behavioral intentions for fashion apparel consumption. Instrumental values had a greater influence on brand consciousness and behavioral intentions than terminal values. Brand consciousness mediated the relationship between instrumental/terminal values and behavioral intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study defined two value orientations (i.e. instrumental versus terminal) using cross-sectional data from an emerging market. Future studies may examine the research findings’ generalizability using diverse data sets (longitudinal and cross-sectional) and evaluate the value orientation and customers’ favorable behavioral intentions for luxury fashion consumption.

Practical implications

This study provides insights into luxury marketers and practitioners to understand the contribution of instrumental and terminal values on brand consciousness and behavioral intentions for luxury fashion apparel. The findings would assist in developing marketing strategies for an emerging market, i.e. India.

Social implications

With the rapid proliferation of materialism, the Indian market has witnessed the dawn of a new era of luxury fashion acceptance. The research offers evidence that in emerging markets such as India, consumers exhibit value orientation toward luxury brands while holding a sense of fashion involvement in their consumption behavior.

Originality/value

This study is a pioneering attempt to understand the relationships between the value orientation, namely, instrumental and terminal values and their underlying influence on brand consciousness and behavioral intentions toward fashion apparel. Rokeach’s (1973) two-dimensional value dichotomy was adapted to understand luxury apparel consumption in an emerging market context, specifically India.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Ali Alnaas and Afzalur Rashid

This paper aims to examine the influence of firm characteristics on harmonisation of companies listed on the Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia Stock Exchanges.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of firm characteristics on harmonisation of companies listed on the Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia Stock Exchanges.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a checklist based mainly on the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

Findings

The findings of the study are 6that the level of compliance with IFRS was higher in 2010 than in 2005. Multiple regression analysis indicates that the level of compliance with IFRS increases with company size, institutional ownership, industry and language of disclosure.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study suggest that both institutional- and firm-level forces influence the harmonisation process.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on accounting harmonisation in the context of North Africa.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Majid Mohammad Shafiee, Pantea Foroudi and Reihaneh Alsadat Tabaeeian

This paper aims to investigate the impact of memorable destination experience and destination attractiveness on tourist-destination identification and destination love. It…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impact of memorable destination experience and destination attractiveness on tourist-destination identification and destination love. It also investigates the moderating role of gender.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the cluster sampling method, the study selected cities of a developing country with the most popular destinations. A questionnaire survey was used to collect data from a sample of foreign and domestic tourists. To test the research model, a covariance-based structural equation modelling approach was adopted.

Findings

According to the results, destination attractiveness and memorable experience had a positive effect on tourist-destination identification. Similarly, tourist-destination identification positively influenced destination love. In addition, destination love impacts the intention to revisit and word-of-mouth. Finally, the results indicate that gender moderates some of these relationships.

Originality/value

Understanding what items can create strong bonds between destination and tourist is of great importance. By providing a validated conceptual model that traces the relationship between memorable experience, destination attractiveness and tourist-destination identification through cognitive, affective and evaluative dimensions, this study attempts to answer prior calls for examination from the viewpoint of tourism scholars.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

1 – 10 of 60