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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Andreas Kuehn

This article compares the use of deep packet inspection (DPI) technology to the use of cookies for online behavioral advertising (OBA), in the form of two competing

Abstract

Purpose

This article compares the use of deep packet inspection (DPI) technology to the use of cookies for online behavioral advertising (OBA), in the form of two competing paradigms. It seeks to explain why DPI was eliminated as a viable option due to political and regulatory reactions whereas cookies technology was not, even though it raises some of the same privacy issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paradigms draw from two-sided market theory to conceptualize OBA. Empirical case studies, NebuAd's DPI platform and Facebook's Beacon program, substantiate the paradigms with insights into the controversies on behavioral tracking between 2006 and 2009 in the USA. The case studies are based on document analyses and interviews.

Findings

Comparing the two cases from a technological, economic, and institutional perspective, the article argues that both paradigms were equally privacy intrusive. Thus, it rejects the generally held view that privacy issues can explain the outcome of the battle. Politics and regulatory legacy tilted the playing field towards the cookies paradigm, impeding a competing technology.

Originality/value

Shifting the narrative away from privacy to competing tracking paradigms and their specific actors sheds light on the political and the regulatory rationales that were not considered in previous research on OBA. Particularly, setting forth institutional aspects on OBA – and DPI in general – the case studies provide much needed empirical analysis to reassess tracking technologies and policy outcomes.

Details

info, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Leo Van Audenhove

Abstract

Details

info, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2020

Jan Kühn, Andreas Bartel and Piotr Putek

The thermally extended Tellinen model (Kühn et al., to appear) is here investigated and equipped with a hysteresis loss model, while preserving its simple structure.

Abstract

Purpose

The thermally extended Tellinen model (Kühn et al., to appear) is here investigated and equipped with a hysteresis loss model, while preserving its simple structure.

Design/methodology/approach

As in the original model, these approaches are based upon phenomenal observations and measured saturation curves. The authors start with the original model and step-by-step add their extensions, such that in the end they can apply the extended model in a finite element method (FEM) simulation. During the process, care is taken to ensure that the applicability in a FEM simulation is not impaired, in terms of memory requirements and computing power.

Findings

In comparison to the original model, this extended model needs some further requirements and so is a little bit more limited in its application. It is in itself coherent and well defined. The authors provide an on-the-fly algorithm computation of hysteresis losses. First numerical results for a coupled field/thermal system show expected behavior.

Originality/value

The original model (Tellinen, 1998) does not take temperature into account. It includes a model for calculating hysteresis losses, but it differs largely from the approach presented here. The thermal extension is now also equipped with an on-the-fly method for hysteresis losses. Furthermore, the authors provide some analysis of simple, stable loops.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2019

Marta Cianfrini, Massimo Corcione, Alessandro Quintino and Vincenzo Andrea Spena

The purpose of this study is to investigate numerically the laminar natural convection from a pair of horizontal heated cylinders, set one above the other, inside a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate numerically the laminar natural convection from a pair of horizontal heated cylinders, set one above the other, inside a water-filled rectangular enclosure cooled at sides, with perfectly insulated top and bottom walls, through a control-volume formulation of the finite-difference method, with the main aim to evaluate the effects of the center-to-center cylinder spacing, the size of the cavity and the temperature difference imposed between the cylinders and the cavity sides.

Design/methodology/approach

The system of the conservation equations of the mass, momentum and energy, expressed in dimensionless form, is solved by a specifically developed computer code based on the SIMPLE-C algorithm for the pressure-velocity coupling. Numerical simulations are executed for different values of the Rayleigh number based on the cylinder diameter, as well as the center-to-center cylinder spacing and the width of the cavity normalized by the cylinder diameter.

Findings

The main results obtained may be summarized as follows: the existence of an optimum cylinder spacing for maximum heat transfer rate is found at any investigated Rayleigh number; as a consequence of the downstream confinement, a periodic flow arises at sufficiently high Rayleigh numbers; the amplitude of oscillation of the periodic heat transfer performance of the cylinder array decreases as the cylinder spacing is increased and the cavity width is decreased, whereas the frequency of oscillations remains almost the same; at very small cavity widths, a transition from the typical two-cell to a four-cell flow pattern occurs.

Originality/value

The computational code used in the present study incorporates an original composite polar/Cartesian discretization grid scheme.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Tshinakaho Relebogile Seaba and Raymond Mompoloki Kekwaletswe

The purpose of this paper is to argue that an e‐collaboration environment, driven by awareness of social presence, may provide the just‐in‐time learning support needed by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that an e‐collaboration environment, driven by awareness of social presence, may provide the just‐in‐time learning support needed by postgraduate students. The academic challenges faced by students may be alleviated if a correct electronic platform is provided for them to be able to consult with each other or their instructors, regardless of time or their locations. Thus, the paper conceptualises how awareness of social presence may help address the challenges by facilitating e‐collaboration of postgraduate students.

Design/methodology/approach

The interpretive paradigm was followed in the study, where a university of technology, located in the city of Pretoria, South Africa, was used as a case study. Selective sampling, specifically purposive sampling was then used to select participants. This kind of sampling is suitable for qualitative case studies and focuses on sample selection based on relevance to the context and problem.

Findings

The limited and inconsistent learning support hinders a smooth learning experience, often leading to delayed or incomplete learning tasks, including research works. The alternative for students is then to seek support from knowledgeable peers, who are often dispersed in varied geographical locations. Thus, it is important that the framework for e‐collaboration amongst postgraduate students be developed cognizant of the social presence awareness indicators that would help students to establish sense of togetherness during e‐collaboration.

Originality/value

Social presence and e‐collaboration literature inadequately addresses both, with respect to graduate candidates. This paper looks at how awareness of social presence and context effects e‐collaboration.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Karise Hutchinson, Lisa Victoria Donnell, Audrey Gilmore and Andrea Reid

The purpose of this paper is to understand how small to medium-sized enterprise (SME) retailers adopt and implement a loyalty card programme as a marketing management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how small to medium-sized enterprise (SME) retailers adopt and implement a loyalty card programme as a marketing management decision-making tool.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative and longitudinal case study research design is adopted. Data were collected from multiple sources, incorporating semi-structured interviews and analysis of company documents and observation within a retail SME.

Findings

The findings presented focus on the loyalty card adoption process to reflect both the organisational issues and impact upon marketing management decision-making.

Research limitations/implications

This research is restricted to one region within the UK, investigating loyalty card adoption within a specific industry sector.

Practical implications

SME retailers operate in an industry environment whereby there is a competitive demand for loyalty card programmes. SME retailers need to carefully consider how to match the firm’s characteristics with customer relationship management (CRM) operational requirements as highlighted in this case.

Originality/value

The evidence presented extends current knowledge of retail loyalty card programmes beyond the context of large organisations to encompass SMEs. The study also illustrates the value of a structured, formal CRM system to help SME retailers compete in a complex, competitive and omni-channel marketplace, adding new insights into the retail literature.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Andreas Brecht

Discusses the requirements in environmental monitoring ‐ primarily in aqueous environments. Detection of substances below the ppb‐level may be required. Many analytes lack…

Abstract

Discusses the requirements in environmental monitoring ‐ primarily in aqueous environments. Detection of substances below the ppb‐level may be required. Many analytes lack intrinsic properties suitable for direct detection by a sensor. Therefore, separation, concentration, and chemical conversion may be required. Sensors may require calibration and conditioning. Efforts are taken to integrate these functions with sensor components to give integrated sensor systems, which allow unattended operation in the environment.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Dugassa Tessema Gerba

The purpose of this paper is to examine the entrepreneurial intentions of undergraduate university students in Ethiopia by making a comparative analysis among different…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the entrepreneurial intentions of undergraduate university students in Ethiopia by making a comparative analysis among different groups of students.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 156 students completed entrepreneurship intention questionnaire. The questionnaire has seven parts extracting information about personal attraction, subjective norm, self‐efficacy, entrepreneurial intention, need for achievement, locus of control, and instrumental readiness. The respondents were asked to state their agreement/disagreement on statements on a seven‐point Likert type scale.

Findings

The result identified that students who had undergone entrepreneurship education (business management student in this case) tend to have better entrepreneurial intention than those who had not taken entrepreneurship course (engineering students). Also, it was observed that male management students have higher personal attraction towards entrepreneurial career, subjective norms, self‐efficacy and achievement need than female management students, as well as male and female engineering students, while female management students have the lowest instrumental readiness than students in other groups. The study did not find significant difference in entrepreneurial intention of students who had exposure to entrepreneurial activity through family and those who had no such exposures.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this research lies in the sample size and the study units (universities) from which samples have been taken. Future research is recommended to predict entrepreneurship intention of students by taking larger sample from more universities in the country.

Practical implications

The study strongly suggests the need to incorporate entrepreneurship education in the curriculum of technical disciplines in Ethiopian universities.

Originality/value

The research provides assessment of entrepreneurship intention of university students in the country/culture which was not explored in the past and hence it further enriches literature and helps to universalize intention theories.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

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