Search results

1 – 10 of 129
Article
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Maria Lammerdina Bobbink, Andreas Hartmann and Geert Dewulf

This paper aims to investigate the effect of institutional logics on the intended resource coordination and integration in extended enterprises (EEs).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of institutional logics on the intended resource coordination and integration in extended enterprises (EEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative multiple case study approach collected data from three EEs and their hierarchical organizational context in the restructured and privatized railway sector of the Netherlands by observing 40 meetings, conducting 31 semi-structured interviews and 9 feedback meetings and perusing organizational documents.

Findings

Performance and professional logics characterized the EEs and their hierarchical organizational context. Aligning these logics failed to support the resource coordination and integration in the EEs because of the logics’ resource-centric nature. The co-creation logic in one of the EEs mitigated this resource centrism by addressing the resource personifications and representations of the professional and performance logics. Business unit representatives having hierarchically overlapping organizational positions supported this change process by offering protection from resource-centric logics.

Research limitations/implications

The chosen research design limits the generalization of the findings but reveals new scientific and practical insights on the role of institutional logics for sustaining EEs.

Practical implications

The various EE business-units, but especially their contract and concession authorities, need to realize the crippling effect of resource-centric logics on sustaining an EE. Becoming aware of the resource personifications and representations of these logics can assist in addressing their negative effects.

Originality/value

No previous studies have empirically investigated the effect of institutional logics on the intended resource coordination and integration in EEs.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Andreas Hartmann

Motivation is the main force through which individuals allocate effort to generate and implement innovative ideas. However, employees are only motivated to go beyond their…

9689

Abstract

Motivation is the main force through which individuals allocate effort to generate and implement innovative ideas. However, employees are only motivated to go beyond their designated role and get involved in spontaneous and innovative activities if they have a strong identification with the organization. Organizational culture plays a critical role in motivating innovative behaviour, as it can create commitment among members of an organization in terms of believing in innovation as an organizational value and accepting innovation‐related norms prevalent within the organization. The research this paper reports on addresses the motivational aspects of the relationship between culture and innovation in construction firms. Specifically, it focuses on those managerial actions through which the importance of innovation may be communicated and innovation‐related behaviour may be induced and reinforced. An in‐depth case study investigating the innovation activities of a Swiss contractor revealed that project constraints and regional separation may diminish the motivational effects of managerial actions in construction firms. It is concluded that a culture that motivates new solutions and innovative improvements in particular first of all prevents ideas from getting lost in daily business and within the organization. Giving immediate feedback, providing communication channels for implicit knowledge, allowing for autonomous work and task identity, initiating innovation projects and using a comprehensive reward and incentive system are appropriate managerial actions in this regard.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Andreas Hartmann and Peter E.D. Love

465

Abstract

Details

Facilities, vol. 29 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Andreas Hartmann and Gerhard Girmscheid

In the last few years an increasing demand for integrated services could be recognised on the construction market. For construction firms this means that there is a wider…

Abstract

In the last few years an increasing demand for integrated services could be recognised on the construction market. For construction firms this means that there is a wider scope for achieving advantages in competition. Based on a research project on the innovation behaviour of two Swiss contractors this paper presents the innovation potential of integrated services and the advantages and disadvantages of the present organizational structure of medium‐sized contractors with respect to the usage of this potential. Moreover, possibilities for construction firms to build up and benefit from internal and external co‐operation and to generate innovative constructional solutions are discussed. It is concluded that an innovative construction industry requires the ability of construction firms to co‐operate.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Andreas Hartmann, Jens Roehrich, Lars Frederiksen and Andrew Davies

The paper analyses how public buyers transition from procuring single products and services to procuring complex performance (PCP). The aim is to examine the change in the…

2208

Abstract

Purpose

The paper analyses how public buyers transition from procuring single products and services to procuring complex performance (PCP). The aim is to examine the change in the interactions between buyer and supplier, the emergence of value co-creation and the capability development during the transition process.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple, longitudinal case study method is used to examine the transition towards PCP. The study deploys rich qualitative data sets by combining semi-structured interviews, focus group meetings and organisational reports and documents.

Findings

The transition towards PCP can be best described as a learning process which cumulates the knowledge and experience in the client-supplier interaction accompanied by changing contractual and relational capabilities. In public infrastructure this process is not initially motivated by the benefits of value co-creation, but is politically driven.

Practical implications

The study proposes three generic transition stages towards increased performance and infrastructural complexity moderated by contract duration. These stages may help managers of public agencies to identify the current procurement level and the contractual and relational challenges they need to master when facing higher levels of performance and infrastructural complexity.

Originality/value

The study adds to the limited empirical and conceptual understanding on the nature of long-term public-private interactions in PCP. It contributes through a rare focus adopting a longitudinal perspective on these interactions in the transition towards PCP.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Ying Nan Yang and Mohan M. Kumaraswamy

This paper aims to present approaches towards improving some specific infrastructure maintenance principles, strategies, models and practices, based on a recent study of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present approaches towards improving some specific infrastructure maintenance principles, strategies, models and practices, based on a recent study of bridge management systems in Hong Kong. A specific goal is to develop better informed and more systematic approaches to condition assessment, deterioration forecasting, and maintenance decision making over the life‐cycle of the built asset.

Design/methodology/approach

Improved performance prediction and decision‐making approaches are developed and presented based on a research exercise to formulate a maintenance management framework for concrete bridge elements in Hong Kong. This includes for example, the presentation of decision‐making approaches for optimizing inspection intervals on bridge expansion joints.

Findings

The findings show that judicious integration is needed in incorporating valuable elements of, and lessons learned from, previous practice with proposed new strategies/ principles, models and practices for specific scenarios.

Practical implications

Based on the findings, practitioners' understandings can be deepened as regards the barriers to improving condition assessment, deterioration forecasting, and maintenance decision making over the life‐cycle of the built asset. Furthermore, the results also provide useful information for developing strategies and practices to improve currently used infrastructure management systems.

Originality/value

Major obstacles are overcome in developing better informed and more systematic approaches as above, and in extending current knowledge on condition assessment, performance prediction and decision‐making models by utilizing more pertinent data and addressing some barriers in practical implementation.

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

William Ibbs and Ying‐Yi Chih

Recent literature has proposed many theoretical methods to help decision makers choose an appropriate project delivery system (PDS) in a rational manner. None of these…

1814

Abstract

Purpose

Recent literature has proposed many theoretical methods to help decision makers choose an appropriate project delivery system (PDS) in a rational manner. None of these articles however systematically compare and systematize the available PDS selection methods and guide decision makers in choosing a method that best meets their PDS decision‐making circumstances. This paper aims to bridge this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

Four groups of PDS selection methods, namely, guidance (e.g. decision charts and guidelines), multi‐attribute analysis (e.g. multi‐attribute utility theory and analytical hierarchical process), knowledge‐ and experience‐based (e.g. case‐based reasoning), and mix‐method approaches are reviewed, compared and systematized.

Findings

The discussed methods vary in their underlying concepts, complexities of implementation and levels of required information. They also differ in the ways how decision makers' preferences are elucidated, expressed and measured. A conceptual framework is proposed to help decision makers match a PDS selection method with their decision‐making circumstances.

Practical implications

The paper highlights limitations of the discussed methods, and presents areas for future research.

Originality/value

This paper helps decision makers develop a fundamental understanding of the available PDS selection methods, and match a PDS selection method with their unique decision‐making circumstances. Using a suitable method will improve the decision‐making efficiency.

Article
Publication date: 7 May 2014

Bryan Tyrone Adey, Nam Lethanh, Andreas Hartmann and Francesco Viti

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of the impact hierarchy and the optimization model to determine the optimal intervention strategy for a road link…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of the impact hierarchy and the optimization model to determine the optimal intervention strategy for a road link composed of multiple objects. The paper focusses on the results of a case study of intervention project on A20 road link in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was a case study research. It describes briefly the impact hierarchy and its link to the optimization model, and then focussed on analyzing the results obtained from running the model. In order to understand the influence of various factors affecting the results of optimization, sensitivity analysis was performed.

Findings

The proposed hierarchy is suitable to be used to support the determination of optimal intervention strategies (OISs) for public road. From the case study, it was also realized that optimal intervention strategy can be changed due to not only intervention costs incurred by the owner, but also due to the setup of traffic configuration during the execution of interventions since the impacts incurred to users, directly affected public, and indirectly affected public are significantly different from one traffic configuration to the others. The optimal intervention strategy also depends greatly on the factors of deterioration during the operation of the infrastructure objects.

Research limitations/implications

In the impact hierarchy, some impact factors are difficult to be quantified, e.g., the long-term economic impacts on the region where having intervention projects. The use of only exponential function for impacts could be oversimplified the actual behavior of the impacts. Other functional form should be investigated to be used within the framework of the optimization model.

Practical implications

The proposed hierarchy and the optimization model could be used in practical situation for determination of OISs for multiple objects within a road link.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the body of knowledge of stakeholder analysis in the field of infrastructure asset management. It also gives a guideline and tool for infrastructure administrators to select the OISs for their infrastructure network.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Telli E. van der Lei and Paulien M. Herder

This work is part of a research project that seeks to gain insight into the applicability of different actor analysis methods. This paper aims to describe the analysis of…

839

Abstract

Purpose

This work is part of a research project that seeks to gain insight into the applicability of different actor analysis methods. This paper aims to describe the analysis of the predictive value of two different actor analysis methods applied to the redesign of the water management of a Dutch polder.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper's approach is a parallel application and comparison of the results of two separate actor analysis methods: conflict analysis and transactional analysis.

Findings

Transactional analysis was more accurate regarding the prediction of the real world outcomes than conflict analysis.

Research limitations/implications

The choice of analysis method may be of significant influence on the quality of understanding of the risks involved with different stakeholders. There may not be a single silver bullet.

Practical implications

An asset manager needs to apply multiple actor analysis techniques to fully grasp the impact of the threats posed by the stakeholders on the asset and its risk register.

Originality/value

The parallel application of the two methods and comparison of their predictive value is new.

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Andreas Hartmann and Jasper Caerteling

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative importance of price and trust and their interaction in subcontractor selection. By doing so, it aims to respond to the…

6192

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative importance of price and trust and their interaction in subcontractor selection. By doing so, it aims to respond to the currently dominant view that trust‐based procurement is the remedy to performance problems in construction. The paper also aims to argue that a specific interplay of both price and trust is always inherent to the selection of subcontracted services.

Design/methodology/approach

A choice‐based conjoint experiment was conducted to underpin the initial argument. The conjoint analysis is based on a sample of medium‐sized contractors from the Dutch residential building industry.

Findings

The research shows that neither price nor trust can be downplayed as procurement mechanisms. On the one hand, through repeated relationships main contractors become more confident in judging the performance of subcontractors. The level of trust increases and finally affects the supplier selection. On the other hand, favourable quotes are a prerequisite for trust to become choice relevant. Moreover, the extent to which subcontractors have performed with respect to quality, technical know‐how and cooperation in the past finally accounts for whether they are chosen or not.

Research limitations/implications

The joint occurrence of price and trust as procurement mechanisms should be acknowledged. More research is needed to understand the trade‐offs main contractors make between price and trust while procuring subcontracted services.

Practical implications

Subcontractors need to offer competitive bids to be able to increase their chance of recurrent relationships with main contractors and thus trust development.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first that considers the interaction of price and trust in subcontractor procurement. It contributes to the ongoing discussion around partnering and supply chain integration in construction.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

1 – 10 of 129