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1 – 10 of 337
Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

James A. Roffee and Andrea Waling

The purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of experiences of anti-social behaviour in LGBTIQ+ youth in university settings.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of experiences of anti-social behaviour in LGBTIQ+ youth in university settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion reflects on qualitative interviews with LGBTIQ+ young people studying at university (n=16) exploring their experiences of anti-social behaviour including harassment, bullying and victimisation in tertiary settings.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that attention should be paid to the complex nature of anti-social behaviour. In particular, LGBTIQ+ youth documented experiences of microaggressions perpetrated by other members of the LGBTIQ+ community. Using the taxonomy of anti-social behaviour against LGBTIQ+ people developed by Nadal et al. (2010, 2011), the authors build on literature that understands microaggressions against LGBTIQ+ people as a result of heterosexism, to address previously unexplored microaggressions perpetrated by other LGBTIQ+ people.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could seek a larger sample of participants from a range of universities, as campus climate may influence the experiences and microaggressions perpetrated.

Practical implications

Individuals within the LGBTIQ+ community also perpetrate microaggressions against LGBTIQ+ people, including individuals with the same sexual orientation and gender identity as the victim. Those seeking to respond to microaggressions need to attune their attention to this source of anti-social behaviour.

Originality/value

Previous research has focused on microaggressions and hate crimes perpetrated by non-LGBTIQ+ individuals. This research indicates the existence of microaggressions perpetrated by LGBTIQ+ community members against other LGBTIQ+ persons. The theoretical taxonomy of sexual orientation and transgender microaggressions is expanded to address LGBTIQ+ perpetrated anti-social behaviour.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Experiments in Organizational Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-964-0

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Graciela Metternicht, Andrea Sabelli and Jason Spensley

This paper aims to present a new framework for climate change vulnerability, impact and adaptation (VIA) assessment. Greater attention has been given in recent years to…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a new framework for climate change vulnerability, impact and adaptation (VIA) assessment. Greater attention has been given in recent years to the importance of conducting climate change VIA assessment prior to, or as part of, climate change adaptation strategies and projects. A VIA assessment provides decision-makers and project developers with information on the location and causes of vulnerability based on local knowledge and scientific data, so that effective adaptation responses that are targeted and site-specific can be designed. A challenge facing practitioners in this field is the lack of clear methodologies or agreed frameworks on how to conduct a VIA assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a VIA methodological framework that has been developed through three sub-regional pilot assessments on vulnerability and impacts of climate change, as part of the Regional Gateway for Technology Transfer and Action on Climate Change in Latin America and The Caribbean.

Findings

While it is recognized that methodologies and tools may differ depending on the unique local context of the study area and sector under analysis, there are key components that every assessment needs to consider.

Originality/value

The framework proposed can assist practitioners to deliver outputs from VIAs that are holistic, and provide the most appropriate type of information required for effective, context-specific adaptation responses.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Vicky Heap

339

Abstract

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Louise Andrea Sicard

The purpose of this paper is to examine music as a therapy for complex needs and offending behaviour.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine music as a therapy for complex needs and offending behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilised the rapid evidence assessment (REA) approach to collect and assess the current data pertaining to music as a therapy for complex needs and offending behaviour. Within the REA this study used a thematic analysis as the analytical framework to manage and explore the wealth of data collected during the REA.

Findings

The results of this study are presented in two parts – first, the application of music as a therapy for complex needs and second, music as a therapy for offending behaviour. These two sections explore music therapy as an effective intervention method for offending behaviour and/or complex needs. Psychopathy as a complex need is a subsidiary theme that is also investigated within this section.

Research limitations/implications

To present music as a therapy as an effective method of therapy and intervention for those with offending behaviour and/or complex needs, thus, leading to further research in the field.

Practical implications

To incorporate music therapy into working with offending behaviour; to incorporate music therapy into interventions for those with complex needs, such as psychopaths; to recognise a need for developing innovative approaches/methods to address gaps in treatment; and to recognise music therapy’s potential as a programme utilised alongside cognitive-behavioural therapy.

Originality/value

There has been a significant amount of academic attention given to researching music as an effective therapy for select groups such as those with autism, anxiety, dementia and depression. The scope of this attention has extended to examine the link between music, cognition and emotion. The limitation of this work is the lack of research that has focussed on music as a therapy as an intervention for complex needs and offending behaviour, to which this study will begin to redress.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Andrea Giordano and Alison Neville

The purpose of the paper is to improve the consistency and quality of the response to vulnerable adults who experience abuse and neglect within NHS, independent healthcare…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to improve the consistency and quality of the response to vulnerable adults who experience abuse and neglect within NHS, independent healthcare and social care settings is noted by practitioners, agencies and patients. Health and social care policy frameworks promote principles of service improvement and consistency, along with a focus on outcomes and resource effectiveness and interagency collaboration. The Protection of Vulnerable Adults (POVA) coordinator role carries the responsibility of coordinating a response to individual referrals of abuse and neglect as described as part of the Designated Lead Manager role in the Wales Interim POVA Policy and Procedures for the POVA from abuse (Wales Adult Protection Coordinators Group, 2013).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper will explore the benefits realised through a registered nurse being seconded from the Aneurin Bevan University Health Board into a newly created joint adult protection Health Coordinator post within the Caerphilly County Borough Council social services department POVA team.

Findings

This is the first example of such partnership working in adult protection in Wales and has provided a number of benefits in relation to: providing adult protection advice; coordinating the response to referrals of vulnerable adult abuse and neglect within health and social care settings; carrying out or buddying others to complete adult protection investigations; facilitating the two day non-criminal POVA investigation training course and, awareness raising within the local Health Board. The development of a student nurse placement in the social services POVA team cements the multiagency collaborative approach that this development sought to achieve.

Originality/value

The need to improve the consistency and quality of the response to vulnerable adults who experience abuse and neglect within NHS, independent healthcare and social care settings is noted by practitioners, agencies and patients.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Sanne Frandsen, Manto Gotsi, Allanah Johnston, Andrea Whittle, Stephen Frenkel and André Spicer

The branding of universities is increasingly recognized to present a different set of challenges than in corporate, for-profit sectors. The purpose of this paper is to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The branding of universities is increasingly recognized to present a different set of challenges than in corporate, for-profit sectors. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how faculty make sense of branding in the context of higher education, specifically considering branding initiatives in business schools.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on qualitative interviews with faculty regarding their responses to organizational branding at four business schools. Discourse analysis was used to analyze the interview data.

Findings

The study reveals varied, fluid and reflexive faculty interpretations of organizational branding. Faculty interviewed in the study adopted a number of stances towards their schools’ branding efforts. In particular, the study identifies three main faculty responses to branding: endorsement, ambivalence and cynicism.

Originality/value

The study contributes by highlighting the ambiguities and ambivalence generated by brand management initiatives in the higher education context, offering original insights into the multiple ways that faculty exploit, frame and resist attempts to brand their organizations. The authors conclude by discussing the implications of these findings for branding in university contexts.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Marc Mordey

The purpose of this paper is to explore the development and implementation of the Older People's Strategy for Wales and the role of the Older People's Commissioner for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the development and implementation of the Older People's Strategy for Wales and the role of the Older People's Commissioner for Wales; and to identify lessons for other countries that are considering different approaches to implementing ageing strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Round table discussions were held with key people involved in the development and delivery of the Older People's Strategy, the work of the Older People's Commission, plus the paper draws from some of the relevant literature.

Findings

There is evidence of the successful implementation of aspects of the Strategy and also and an overview of the role and work of the Older People's Commissioner. Scope for further and future improvement is apparent.

Originality/value

The paper endeavours to set out the key factors for a successful policy and practice approach to developing effective ageing strategies and public services for older people.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Andreas Vlachidis and Douglas Tudhope

The purpose of this paper is to present the role and contribution of natural language processing techniques, in particular negation detection and word sense disambiguation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the role and contribution of natural language processing techniques, in particular negation detection and word sense disambiguation in the process of Semantic Annotation of Archaeological Grey Literature. Archaeological reports contain a great deal of information that conveys facts and findings in different ways. This kind of information is highly relevant to the research and analysis of archaeological evidence but at the same time can be a hindrance for the accurate indexing of documents with respect to positive assertions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a method for adapting the biomedicine oriented negation algorithm NegEx to the context of archaeology and discusses the evaluation results of the new modified negation detection module. A particular form of polysemy, which is inflicted by the definition of ontology classes and concerning the semantics of small finds in archaeology, is addressed by a domain specific word-sense disambiguation module.

Findings

The performance of the negation dection module is compared against a “Gold Standard” that consists of 300 manually annotated pages of archaeological excavation and evaluation reports. The evaluation results are encouraging, delivering overall 89 per cent precision, 80 per cent recall and 83 per cent F-measure scores. The paper addresses limitations and future improvements of the current work and highlights the need for ontological modelling to accommodate negative assertions.

Originality/value

The discussed NLP modules contribute to the aims of the OPTIMA pipeline delivering an innovative application of such methods in the context of archaeological reports for the semantic annotation of archaeological grey literature with respect to the CIDOC-CRM ontology.

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Stephen Beyer, Andrea Meek and Amy Davies

The Real Opportunities project set out to implement a number of the approaches identified through research that can assist transition to adulthood in nine local authority…

Abstract

Purpose

The Real Opportunities project set out to implement a number of the approaches identified through research that can assist transition to adulthood in nine local authority areas in Wales. Supported work experience was delivered by small job coaching teams in each area. The purpose of this paper is to establish the impact of the work experience and employment teams by describing the placements provided, any change in the skills of young people, and the responses to the placements by employers, young people and their families.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected over 24 months by participating employment services. Questionnaires were administered to employers. Interviews were carried out with a sub-sample of young people (24) participating and a family member (25).

Findings

Over a 24-month period 297 young people received supported work experience. In total, 262 young people had an intellectual disability, 35 an autistic spectrum disorder. Up to three placements were delivered to each person, averaging five weeks per placement, with 405 placements in total. In total, 62 per cent of those with two placements had a different category of second work placement to their first. These numbers demonstrated that work experience in community placements is possible with support. Young people improved work skills significantly between first and second placements. Employers reported high satisfaction rates with the young person’s work in a range of key performance areas and company benefits from participation for other staff, company image and customer relations. Interviews with 24 young people and 25 of their family members reported satisfaction with support and placements. Six young people had paid work now, and 33 per cent said they would get a job at some future time. Families reported changes in young person’s outlook but their view of prospects of employment remained pessimistic due to the external environment.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for future research are discussed.

Practical implications

Implications for transition are discussed.

Originality/value

The paper provides new insight into the impact of a large number of supported work experience placements.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

1 – 10 of 337