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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Kenneth Andrew Searle, Liz Ellis, Marianthi Kourti, Andrea MacLeod, Caroline Lear, Callum Duckworth, Davide Irvine, Harry Jones, Michaela King, Jessica Ling and John Simpson

The purpose of this paper is to address the benefits of a participatory approach to autism research, demonstrating the positive effects of giving autistic project assistants (PAs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the benefits of a participatory approach to autism research, demonstrating the positive effects of giving autistic project assistants (PAs) the opportunity to design and undertake a project researching the experiences of autistic university students.

Design/methodology/approach

A participatory approach was implemented, engaging autistic university students as research assistants. All the research team except project co-ordinators were autistic. Undergraduate autistic students developed and conducted a set of semi-structured interviews, with two autistic alumni responsible for data analysis and both scheduling and moderating focus groups. Participation in dissemination of the findings was open to all.

Findings

The results included in this paper reflect a portion of the overall findings, specifically regarding the participatory approach. The findings of the study indicate the perceptions of respondents being interviewed by autistic researchers in relation to their shared understanding, facilitating positive feelings and a sense of rapport in the interview process. The PAs were able to improve their research skills through the project, which contributed constructively to their CV and allowed them to feel more positive about being autistic, and specifically about being an autistic researcher.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to discuss the challenges and benefits of including autistic participant researchers at all stages of the research project, including research design, data collection, analysis and dissemination, being co-written by both project co-ordinators and autistic project researchers.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2010

Andrea MacLeod

This paper reports on the pilot phase of a participatory project to develop an online ‘AS portal’, which provided peer‐to‐peer support for higher education students with…

Abstract

This paper reports on the pilot phase of a participatory project to develop an online ‘AS portal’, which provided peer‐to‐peer support for higher education students with Asperger's syndrome. The process of development is described and the initial outcomes of the pilot evaluated, including qualitative feedback from participants. Participants actively engaged with the portal, by giving and receiving support through in‐depth discussion, much of which centred on the experience of having autism. The research indicates that there is value in further exploring peer support networks for individuals on the autism spectrum and highlights the importance of appropriate design and sufficient time‐scale for such initiatives. It also reflects on the implications of participatory methodologies for both researchers and participants.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2010

Sarah Parsons

Abstract

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Carolina Andrea Gómez Winkler Sudré, José Paulo de Souza and Melise Dantas Machado Bouroullec

The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of governance structure alignment, property rights protection, and reputation in generating efficiency in dairy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of governance structure alignment, property rights protection, and reputation in generating efficiency in dairy agro-industrial system in Paraná, Brazil, and Midi-Pyrénées, France.

Design/methodology/approach

Descriptive qualitative research, comprising semi-structured interviews with producers, processors and key agents of the dairy agrindustrial system in Brazil and France, in 2016/2017.

Findings

As a result, it was identified that measurement generates information about transacted dimensions and when it is shared can generate affect reputation in transactions that leads to system improvement. It was also observed that, in the dairy agro-industrial system, reputation acquired does not reduce all the measurement costs, as the product requires measurement in each all collection, regardless of the reputation created.

Research limitations/implications

As a limitation of the study, there is a difference in the moments when the interviews were done. In 2016, in France, the context was low prices, while in 2017, in Brazil, there was a rise in prices. This difference could have influenced some responses to the interviews, mainly about efficiency by producers.

Practical implications

Reputation, protecion of property rights by measurement and information sharing allows reduction costs (transaction, measurement and negotiation costs). This efficiency implies improvement to the system, in cases of milk producers and processors.

Social implications

Improvements in the dairy system can have repercussions on several other improvements such as better distribution of income among agents in the chain; better-paid producers, which implies the improving quality of lives of these people; better products offered to consumers.

Originality/value

From a complementary perspective of transaction cost economics and measurement cost economics, reputation and protection of property rights are discussed with a focus on efficiency. Empirically, the paper contains heterogeneous data collected from two countries: Brasil and France.

Details

RAUSP Management Journal, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2531-0488

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Emma Hoksbergen and Andrea Insch

The purpose of this paper is to address the need to understand how younger music festival-goers use and engage with a music festival’s Facebook page, and how they perceive this…

2919

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the need to understand how younger music festival-goers use and engage with a music festival’s Facebook page, and how they perceive this social networking service (SNS) as a potential on-line platform for value co-creation.

Design/methodology/approach

Face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted with 16 young adults who attended an annual New Year’s Eve music festival, Rhythm and Vines, in Gisborne, New Zealand.

Findings

Analysis of the interview data revealed that the majority of participants did not actively engage with this platform and could be categorised as passive viewers or information-seekers. In addition, participants perceived five types of value from using this SNS: functional, social, emotional, interactive and aesthetic value. Even though participants were not segmented due to the small sample size, patterns in their levels of engagement with Facebook, attendance status, reasons for attending the festival and the combinations of forms of value that they perceived were identified.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should use a large-scale survey method to obtain a representative sample that is generalisable to a specific population of music festival-goers.

Practical implications

Dominance of features on Facebook providing festival-goers with functional value suggests they prefer a passive or co-optation approach to value co-creation in this context. Due to the limited extent of participants actively co-creating value on this platform, alternative means of encouraging interaction to co-create value with festival-goers should be investigated.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that this SNS provides this group of young adults with a means to connect their real-time festival experience, with their on-line Facebook social network during the year.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2024

Edoardo Amato, Daniela Bernaschi and Maria Camilla Fraudatario

The UN 2030 Agenda defines sustainable development (SD) in a multidimensional approach that encompasses economic, social, and environmental aspects. The Sustainable Development…

Abstract

The UN 2030 Agenda defines sustainable development (SD) in a multidimensional approach that encompasses economic, social, and environmental aspects. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) serve as conceptual ideals, specific targets, and standards that determine global and local priorities. SD falls into the realm of wicked problems due to its multilayered definitions, untamable nature, and possible solutions at an operational level. Addressing these complex problems and challenges requires the localization of the SDGs and the creation of a new governance model tailored to sustainability. These efforts aim to improve policy coherence for SD. This contribution focuses on the importance of localizing the SDGs, which aims to streamline the 2030 Agenda and tailor the SDGs to local needs. Therefore, the importance of multi-stakeholder participation in the formulation of local definitions of the SDGs, policymaking strategies, and consequently the measurement of the SDGs is emphasized. This chapter provides insights into the specific tools and strategies used by the Metropolitan Cities (MCs) in the implementation of coherent SDG policies, with Florence serving as a case study. Despite the challenges faced by MCs, including ambiguous leadership, conflicting objectives between municipalities, and challenges in coherent policy design, this institutional level shows interesting elements, such as functions of long-term planning and coordination, inclusive tools of participation, and the development of new capacities (political and administrative) that could be useful for strengthening governance for SD.

Details

Policy Capacity, Design and the Sustainable Development Goals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-687-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Tali Farbiash and Andrea Berger

Inhibitory control (IC) is a central executive function that shows significant development throughout the preschool years. IC is known as a factor that underlies the ability to…

Abstract

Inhibitory control (IC) is a central executive function that shows significant development throughout the preschool years. IC is known as a factor that underlies the ability to self-regulate in daily situations. This ability is challenged when a child faces negative emotions; a challenge that is seen in children’s IC performance and brain activity. This chapter elaborates on the effects that negative emotional experiences have on children’s IC functioning. Moreover, previous studies regarding the way emotional experiences are reflected in brain activity are included. Additionally, this chapter will offer a comprehensive review of the factors affecting individual differences in IC, including the role of children’s temperamental effortful control and negative affectivity. Further, the role of parenting behaviors will be discussed, focusing on the way in which maternal self-regulation influences child inhibitory control, including related educational implications.

Details

Recent Developments in Neuroscience Research on Human Motivation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-474-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Andrea Scott-Bell

This chapter draws upon the sociological concept of rationalization to explore the role and practice of sports medicine. It highlights attempts by the profession to create a…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter draws upon the sociological concept of rationalization to explore the role and practice of sports medicine. It highlights attempts by the profession to create a rationalized model of health care for sports participants – particularly those involved in high-performance sports settings and the enabling and constraining elements of its enactment.

Approach

The chapter explains how changes in the organization of sports medicine have dovetailed with the increasing rationalization of sport which has been significant in enacting changes in sports medicine that are aligned with a more rationalized model of care.

Findings

Key findings from the literature highlight the difficulties of implementing rationalized health care policy into practice. Specifically, the chapter examines macro-organizational changes to the structure of sports medicine and the extent to which sports medicine represents a rationalized model of health care by virtue of micro-organizational constraints.

Implications

While the discussion draws upon a breadth of research by sociologists of sport who have examined sports medicine practices, the chapter draws heavily on the UK model of sports medicine care in high-performance sport and thus the conclusions may not be wholly transferable to non-UK and non-sports contexts.

Details

The Suffering Body in Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-069-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Andreas Christoph Weber, Veerle De Bosscher and Hippolyt Kempf

Since the 1990s, the International Olympic Committee has offered nations more medal-winning opportunities at every Winter Games. Meanwhile, many countries are constrained by their…

Abstract

Purpose

Since the 1990s, the International Olympic Committee has offered nations more medal-winning opportunities at every Winter Games. Meanwhile, many countries are constrained by their limited financial resources to target sports strategically. The purpose of this paper is to examine the targeting approaches to Olympic Winter Sports of National Sports Agencies (NSAs), and to identify the factors they assess in the decision-making process.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 11 decision makers of medal-winning NSAs at the 2014 Sochi Games. The data were then analysed with reference to strategic management in an approach which combines a resource-based view (RBV) with a market-based view (MBV) to build a competitive advantage.

Findings

The results show that NSAs, like firms, combine an internal analysis that reflects the RBV on resources and capabilities (e.g. athletes’ performance per sport and sport-specific elite sport system), with an external analysis of the competitive environment that reflects an MBV (e.g. sport’s medal market size and intensity of competition at Games) to target sports. Using this information, two phases were distinguished: first, the target sports are identified and finance is prioritised accordingly; second, the allocation of the nation’s resources is constantly reviewed in order to optimise it.

Research limitations/implications

Even though social desirability bias in the responses could not be fully excluded, the findings can help policy-makers to distinguish between the internal and external factors identified in this study, and to make more strategic decisions by combining RBV and MBV approaches to build-up their nation’s competitive advantage.

Originality/value

This paper models the targeting strategies of NSAs during an Olympic cycle by introducing the competitive positioning of firms to sports management.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2022

Vikki Abusidualghoul

Our higher education cohorts are becoming increasingly diverse. Providing beneficial formative and summative feedback for highly diverse groups of students is difficult. Three key…

Abstract

Our higher education cohorts are becoming increasingly diverse. Providing beneficial formative and summative feedback for highly diverse groups of students is difficult. Three key aspects of the feedback process are required to ensure benefits: (i) suitable feedback components; (ii) suitable embedding of feedback in the learning context; and (iii) active engagement in the feedback process. In order to explore these three aspects, this chapter investigates: (a) relevant literature; (b) learning and teaching activities in Warwick Business School’s Distance Learning MBA; and (c) data from an internal committee report that presented the NVivo-processed findings of a review of 173 DLMBA students’ reflections on impactful feedback. The observations and recommendations given here reveal insights that can be applied to other student groups beyond the MBA sphere and ensure an impactful learning and teaching experience for all stakeholders. Thus, the purpose of the chapter is to assist colleagues and students in engaging more fruitfully in feedback processes and in adding tried and tested approaches to their learning and teaching repertoires.

Details

International Environments and Practices of Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-590-6

Keywords

1 – 10 of 36