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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Priscilla Burnham Riosa, Andrea Greenblatt and Barbara Muskat

Youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often have co-occurring health care needs and are likely to come into contact with several health care professionals over their…

Abstract

Purpose

Youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often have co-occurring health care needs and are likely to come into contact with several health care professionals over their lives. At the hospital, youth with ASD may require specialized supports to optimize health care experiences and for medical services to be delivered safely. At present, there is a limited understanding of how to best support this patient population. The purpose of this paper is to develop, implement, and evaluate an online training module for hospital staff about ASD.

Design/methodology/approach

To evaluate participants’ perceived utility of the learning tool, a post-module survey was administered.

Findings

In all, 102 health care professionals and other hospital staff completed the training and evaluation measure. Majority of participants had prior ASD-focused education (66 percent) and had experience working with at least 20 youths with ASD (57 percent). Majority of participants (88 percent) perceived the information from the module to be helpful in their daily work and reported that they learned something new (63 percent). Participants were interested in receiving additional ASD online module training opportunities on topics including: hands-on behavior management strategies, in-hospital resources, guidance on treatment adherence, and ASD training geared specifically to protection services staff.

Originality/value

The results from this evaluation have important practice implications for hospital staff working with patients with ASD and their families. Evidence-based strategies were easily accessible for staff and the module can be feasibly built upon and expanded as well as disseminated beyond the current hospital setting.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Steven D. Harsin

Most young men who are homosexual are not raised in an environment in which homosexual development is even recognized, much less encouraged. It is not unusual for men who…

Abstract

Most young men who are homosexual are not raised in an environment in which homosexual development is even recognized, much less encouraged. It is not unusual for men who have recently identified themselves as gay to not have any idea what being gay is all about. It is common, even typical, for the gay male to “come out” during his late teens or early twenties and to begin both exploring his sexuality and developing a sense of what it means to be gay. There are many resources available which will be of great use to the newly “out” gay male. The resources in this guide may also be of interest to other gay men, but the purpose of the pathfinder as it has been constructed is to provide a strategy for:

Details

Collection Building, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Chris Dodge

The following list focuses on, but is not limited to, lesser‐known printed publications which feature writing and images about sex and sexual politics. Besides…

Abstract

The following list focuses on, but is not limited to, lesser‐known printed publications which feature writing and images about sex and sexual politics. Besides representing a fair amount of irreverence, satire, scholarship, and unabashed eroticism, the list includes citations for material on topics sure to offend: pedophilia (some would say child abuse) and fetishism, to name just two. For an extensive list of more mainstream sex periodicals, consult Ulrich's International Periodicals Directory (Bowker). Don't bother looking there for categories like EROTICA or SEX, however. Ulrich's cities titles like Gent (“Home of the D‐cups”), Penthouse (circulation 2 million, but how many library subscriptions?), Swinging Times, and Uncut (“The magazine of the natural man”), under MEN'S INTERESTS, while some gay and lesbian erotica appears under the heading HOMOSEXUALITY. Also: while accounting for very little sexually‐oriented material of a general nature—Playboy (under MEN), Playgirl (under WOMEN), and Yellow Silk (under GENERAL EDITORIAL)—Bill and Linda Katz's Magazines for libraries, another Bowker publication, features an extensive annotated bibliography of lesbian and gay periodicals (Polly Thistlethwaite and Daniel Tsang, compilers), which includes titles like NAMBLA Bulletin: Voice of the North American Man/Boy Love Association and On Our Backs.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1981

Dorothy S. Gleisner

My object in compiling this bibliography has been to list reference materials that will be useful to pharmacy students, faculty, and reference librarians working with…

Abstract

My object in compiling this bibliography has been to list reference materials that will be useful to pharmacy students, faculty, and reference librarians working with them. While the bibliography is not intended to be comprehensive, I have covered the essential reference sources as well as some additional titles which are certainly desirable. Some of the books have been around for many years and are now in new editions; others are just appearing on the scene. I included periodicals only when they served a special purpose such as to offer a source of statistical or marketing information. Several of the references could have appeared in more than one place and, in the interest of brevity, I arbitrarily chose the category that seems most appropriate to me.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Cristiano Storni

The purpose of this paper is to raise issues about the design of personal health record systems (PHRs) and self-monitoring technology supporting self-care practices of an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to raise issues about the design of personal health record systems (PHRs) and self-monitoring technology supporting self-care practices of an increasing number of individuals dealing with the management of a chronic disease in everyday life. It discusses the results of an ethnographic study exposing to analysis the intricacies and practicalities of managing diabetes “in the wild”. It then describe and discuss the patient-centric design of a diabetes journaling platform that followed the analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The study includes ethnometodological investigation based on in depth interviews, observations in a support group for adults with type 1 diabetes, home visits, shadowing sessions and semi-structured interviews with a series of medical experts (endocrinologists, general practitioners and diabetes nurses). Findings informed the design of a proof-of-concept PHR called Tag-it-Yourself (TiY): a mobile journaling platform that enables the personalization of self-monitoring practices. The platform is thoroughly described along with an evaluation of its use with real users.

Findings

The investigation sheds light on a series of general characters of everyday chronic self-care practices, and how they ask to re-think some of the assumptions and connotations of the current medical model and the traditional sick role of the patient – often unreflectively assumed also in the design of personal technologies (e.g. PHR) to be used by patients in clinically un-controlled settings. In particular, the analysis discusses: the ubiquitous nature of diabetes that is better seen as a lifestyle, the key role of lay expertises and different forms of knowledge developed by the patient in dealing with a disease on a daily basis, and the need of more symmetrical interactions and collaborations with the medical experts.

Research limitations/implications

Reported discussions suggest the need of a more holistic view of self-management of chronic disease in everyday life with more attention being paid on the perspective of the affected individuals. Findings have potential implications on the way PHR and systems to support self-management of chronic disease in everyday life are conceived and designed.

Practical implications

The paper suggests designers and policy makers to look at chronic disease not as a medical condition to be disciplined by a clinical perspective but rather as a complex life-style where the medical cannot be separated by other aspects of everyday life. Such shift in the perspective might suggest new forms of collaborations, new ways of creative evidence and new form of knowledge creation and validation in chronic self-care.

Social implications

The paper suggests re-thinking the role of the patient in chronic-disease self-management. In particular, it suggests giving more room to the patient voice and concerns and suggest how these can enrich rather than complicate the generation of knowledge about self-care practices, at least in type 1 diabetes.

Originality/value

The paper sheds light on everyday intricacies and practicalities of dealing with a chronic disease. Studies of self-care practices that shed light on the patient perspectives are sporadic and often assume a clinical perspective, its assumptions (e.g. biomedical knowledge is the only one available to improve health outcome, doctors know best) and implications (e.g. compliance, asymmetry between the specialist and the patient).

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