Search results

1 – 6 of 6
To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Terence P. Curran, Linda L. Richardson and Andrea E. Smith-Hunter

This case presents an overview of the confectionary industry, a description of the Hershey Foods Corporation, and a look at the company's strategies and the impact of…

Abstract

This case presents an overview of the confectionary industry, a description of the Hershey Foods Corporation, and a look at the company's strategies and the impact of these strategies. The case focuses on the unintended consequences that result from the implementation of dramatic new strategies for a company and what occurs in a company town that displays a very strong paternalistic culture. Some analysts had previously thought that Hershey's profitability and its close relationship with the town, the trust and the school made the company untouchable, but events proved otherwise.

After reading this case, the reader will feel compelled to answer the following questions. What is the best strategy for future growth of Hershey? How important is organizational culture on a corporation's strategic direction? Should the company indeed be sold to a larger corporation?

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Andrea E. Smith‐Hunter and Robert L. Boyd

Scholarly interest in women’s business ownership has increased, but few studies offer theoretically‐based explanations for the racial differences observed among women…

Abstract

Scholarly interest in women’s business ownership has increased, but few studies offer theoretically‐based explanations for the racial differences observed among women entrepreneurs. This paper seeks to remedy this oversight by applying several theories of entrepreneurship to a comparative study of white and minority women. An analysis of survey data from upstate New York shows that these theories can explain why racial differences in women’s business ownership exist. In particular, the theories shed light on these differences by calling attention to a gap between the high aspirations of minority women for business ownership and the paucity of formal entrepreneurial resources that are available to these women (e.g. financial capital and human capital).

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Eunjoo Cho, Zola K. Moon and Tiffany Bounkhong

The study aims to explore motivators and barriers in business venture creation among potential Latina entrepreneurs.

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to explore motivators and barriers in business venture creation among potential Latina entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus group interviews collected data using Latinas between the ages of 20-30 who expressed interest in starting their own businesses in the near future. Interview participants were primarily first-generation college students.

Findings

Findings revealed major themes based around four dimensions of cultural heritage, motivators, barriers and preferred resources. Cultural heritage and gender are both enablers and obstacles for Latinas. Frequently mentioned motivators were parental business ownership, autonomy, flexible income and self-fulfillment. The barriers include fear, lack of financial management knowledge, business location selection and discrimination. The preferred resources were informal education, a checklist, a toolkit, free online resources and networking with business owners and mentors.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study highlight pull factors (i.e. family business background and self-fulfillment) increasing entrepreneurial motivations among Latinas. The present study illustrates the nuanced but substantive interactions of gender and ethnicity in Latinas’ perceptions and attitudes toward new business formation.

Originality/value

The present study contributes to the literature by exploring the motivators and barriers that affect business formation among emerging Latina entrepreneurs. Moreover, past research has not explored both motivators and barriers perceived by nascent Latina entrepreneurs. Findings from this study will assist future researchers in developing materials and programs to aid female and ethnic entrepreneurship.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Karyn Loscocco and Andrea Smith‐Hunter

Recent research on women business owners de‐emphasizes home‐based business ownership, despite the fact that home‐based ownership is on the rise. This study uses data from…

Abstract

Recent research on women business owners de‐emphasizes home‐based business ownership, despite the fact that home‐based ownership is on the rise. This study uses data from the Upstate New York Small Business Project to compare women engaged in home‐based businesses to their counterparts, who locate their businesses outside the home. The results indicate that the women engaged in home‐based business ownership experience less work to family conflict than their counterparts. Yet their businesses enjoy less economic success than those run by their non‐home‐based counterparts. This suggests that home‐based ownership may be a good option only for women who do not have strong financial needs.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Salime Mehtap, Leyla Ozmenekse and Andrea Caputo

Women and disadvantaged minorities within emerging and developing economies often resort to business activity within the informal economy as a way to overcome various…

Abstract

Purpose

Women and disadvantaged minorities within emerging and developing economies often resort to business activity within the informal economy as a way to overcome various barriers and challenges to formal workforce participation. This paper aims to explore the characteristics, motives, barriers and challenges of female engagement in informal business activities in Jordan.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative analysis used in this paper is based upon empirical findings from semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 14 female informal entrepreneurs in Amman, Jordan.

Findings

The study revealed that informal female entrepreneurs tend to be both opportunity- and necessity-driven. Generating profit and contributing to the household income seems to be their main motive. Their businesses were funded either through personal savings or from their social network (e.g. husband, family and friends). Promotion of the business relied mostly on word-of-mouth or social media. High inflation, high competition, time pressures and lack of business skills were cited as the biggest challenges. Besides being content with the status quo, lack of knowledge about the procedures for registering a business and fear of bureaucracy were among the main reasons for not legalizing their activities.

Originality/value

There are very few studies that analyse informal micro-entrepreneurship in the Arab world, particularly in the Jordanian context, which is of growing interest due to low number of women in the workforce and the growing number of refugees in the country. This study therefore presents new knowledge around women’s informal micro-entrepreneurship in Jordan and provides recommendations for further research and policy-making.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

1 – 6 of 6