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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Tamara Hagmaier, Andrea E. Abele and Kyra Goebel

Life satisfaction is an ultimate goal in human existence, and it is also an important factor in the work domain. It may both trigger work-related outcomes and be…

1820

Abstract

Purpose

Life satisfaction is an ultimate goal in human existence, and it is also an important factor in the work domain. It may both trigger work-related outcomes and be influenced by work-related factors. The authors are here concerned with career satisfaction and its association with life satisfaction. From a bottom-up perspective, career satisfaction should enhance life satisfaction; from a top-down perspective, the influence should work in the reverse direction; and from an interactionist perspective reciprocal influences are conceivable. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested these perspectives in two longitudinal studies with three points of measurement each. Study 1 (n=517) covered a period of five years and Study 2 an eight-week period (n=99). The authors analyzed the data by means of latent growth curve modeling and cross-lagged analysis.

Findings

Both studies revealed that life satisfaction and career satisfaction are positively associated both within and across time. The directional association between both constructs is well-represented by a top-down model; further, by a reciprocal influence model. The bottom-up model received least support. Study 2 additionally showed that work centrality is a moderator.

Research limitations/implications

The authors discuss these findings with respect to both the relevance of life satisfaction in the work domain and the relationship between global and domain-specific life satisfaction.

Originality/value

The present research is the first one that investigates the association between career satisfaction and life satisfaction using two longitudinal studies.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Giovanni De Zan, Alberto Felice De Toni, Andrea Fornasier and Cinzia Battistella

The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology to assess the experiential learning processes of learning lean in an innovative learning environment: the lean model…

1459

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology to assess the experiential learning processes of learning lean in an innovative learning environment: the lean model factories.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review on learning and lean management literatures was carried out to design the methodology. Then, a case study methodology was used to test the framework.

Findings

The methodology permitted to asses learning processes and course contents of educational dynamics carried out in model factories and to theoretically ground such learning processes. The test showed that learning lean management is supported through a complete coverage of the eight phases of the learning path.

Research limitations/implications

The methodology contributes to the literatures of lean management and experiential learning, proposing a methodology of assessment. Part of the framework could also be applied to other disciplines.

Practical implications

The methodology could be used for two purposes: to design training courses or to assess existing experiential learning courses.

Originality/value

Due to its intrinsic complexity, learning literature presents few practical framework or tools. Among them, none have provided practical and theoretical-based advice on how to use experiential learning precepts to teach lean management.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 November 2021

Gwen M. Wittenbaum, Kay Yoon and Andrea B. Hollingshead

Groups typically are composed of members with different knowledge, information, and expertise. Group discussion provides the means by which members can communicate their…

Abstract

Groups typically are composed of members with different knowledge, information, and expertise. Group discussion provides the means by which members can communicate their unique knowledge to reach better group decisions, develop a shared system for remembering and retrieving knowledge, and establish their expertise through enacted performance. In this chapter, three streams of research are reviewed that explore knowledge communication in groups: Hidden profiles, transactive memory systems, and a performative view of expertise. Each of these three research streams complements and informs the other. Across these three research streams, 10 major research findings are identified. We offer three research directions that include integrating these research streams, examining knowledge communication in the context of emerging technology (e.g., artificial intelligence), and studying effects of knowledge diversity in conjunction with surface-level diversity (e.g., member race).

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Group and Team Communication Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-501-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Andreas Feldmann and Jan Olhager

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the strategic role of plants, in terms of the type and level of site competence, the relationship with the strategic reason for…

2063

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the strategic role of plants, in terms of the type and level of site competence, the relationship with the strategic reason for location, and the impact on operational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a survey of 103 Swedish manufacturing plants that belong to global production networks and analyze patterns within this context to identify potential archetypes of plants with respect to plant roles, based on factor analysis and cluster analysis.

Findings

It is found that the areas of site competence can be grouped into three bundles, characterized thematically as production‐related, supply chain‐related and development‐related. The plants fall into three categories: some plants have only production‐related competences, some have competences concerning both production and supply chain, and the third group of plants possesses all three bundles of competences.

Research limitations/implications

The results provide empirical evidence that site competences come in bundles in three steps according to themes rather than individually. No significant relationship was found between the level of site competence and the strategic reason for site location.

Practical implications

The results provide empirical support for the co‐location of product development and production, since plants with full responsibility for all competence bundles significantly outperform plants having only production‐related competences on cost efficiency, quality, and new product introductions.

Originality/value

The authors research patterns of site competence at a more detailed level than before in the related literature, as well as study the impact on performance, which has not been done before.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Sanit Srichookiat and Teerasak Jindabot

As a result of the growth of the modernization of retailing, small family grocers have suffered because of the disadvantages of their limited operating resources in…

Abstract

Purpose

As a result of the growth of the modernization of retailing, small family grocers have suffered because of the disadvantages of their limited operating resources in comparison to those of corporate chain retailers. The purpose of this paper is to use the biological analogy of natural selection to illustrate how the idea of retail coexistence rather than mutually exclusive competition can work to the benefit of small family grocers. The inherent differences between chain retailers and small family grocers are examined and their inherent advantages identified. The appropriate strategies for small family grocers toward the particular market are then proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

The review of literature is implemented through the lens of biological analogy to identify the inherent advantages of small family grocers over chain retailers. Resource-advantage (R-A) theory is then incorporated to explain the synthesized framework.

Findings

Size and operational orientation are identified as the inherent differences that small family grocers can utilize to gain some inherent advantages over chain retailers in relation to the proposed segments. The establishment of a personal relationship with the customer is the key inherent advantage that is naturally facilitated by the individual orientation of the small family grocer. Within R-A theory, inherent advantage is seen as a special case of a comparative advantage in resources.

Originality/value

The different viewpoint inspired by the biological analogy that permits small family grocers to shift their mindset from retail competition to retail coexistence and to re-examine their own inherent advantages to serve the heterogeneous demand of consumers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Ingo Kregel, Nadine Ogonek and Benjamin Matthies

Requirements for business improvement professionals depend on different job characteristics. By focussing on lean management, the purpose of this paper is twofold: first…

Abstract

Purpose

Requirements for business improvement professionals depend on different job characteristics. By focussing on lean management, the purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to provide a comprehensive conceptualisation of competencies relevant for lean professionals by comparing them to an existing project management competency framework; and second, to identify their similarities and differences in three different analysed countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper investigates 2,701 online published job advertisements in the USA, UK and Germany by means of a content analysis to compare and contrast the respective job profiles.

Findings

Main findings are similarities and differences in the specification and perception of lean professional’s roles among the three countries. Strikingly, four out of eight considered competency categories comprise 74 per cent of the profiles’ most relevant keywords. Additionally, with the help of a latent semantic analysis, 16 specific competencies can be summarised in a lean professional’s competency taxonomy.

Research limitations/implications

The collected data only represent a snapshot of lean professionals’ advertisements. Also, text mining results from job profiles could largely differ from other techniques like recruiter interviews or company surveys. Further research could use different methods or combine them to construct a more complete model.

Practical implications

Lean education and training as well as the respective candidate selection processes can benefit from these studies’ results.

Originality/value

Requirements and job contents for lean professionals have not been empirically researched on a comparable in-depth level before, even though their expertise is in high demand in any kind of business sector.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 68 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Aristides I Ferreira, Luis F. Martinez, Cary Cooper and Diana M. Gui

Some underlying mechanisms regarding presenteeism still remain unclear, namely, the construct of “presenteeism climate” and the importance of “leadership” Leader-Member…

Abstract

Purpose

Some underlying mechanisms regarding presenteeism still remain unclear, namely, the construct of “presenteeism climate” and the importance of “leadership” Leader-Member Exchange (LMX) for presenteeism. In order to shed some light into this phenomenon, the purpose of this paper is to develop and apply a new scale of presenteeism climate.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, the authors identified a pool of items from the literature and, in Study 2 (n=147) the authors tested 26 items that were pilot studied with exploratory factor analysis. In Study 3 (n=293) the authors tested a three-factor model – extra-time valuation, supervision distrust and co-workers competitiveness – with confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

Results showed that LMX has a negative correlation with presenteeism climate. Study 3 also showed that this structure remained invariant with additional samples from employees working in hospitals from Ecuador (n=90) and China (n=237). Finally, the authors included suggestions for future studies to overcome the limitations of this research.

Practical implications

This study has implications for managers and academics, as it emphasizes the importance of favorable behaviors between leaders and employees in order to decrease presenteeism and its adverse consequences.

Originality/value

The main contribution consists of identifying dimensions of presenteeism climate and developing measures. Additionally, the authors contribute to the literature on leadership by studying the influence of LMX on presenteeism climate.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Abstract

Details

Culture and Society in Tourism Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-683-7

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