Search results

1 – 10 of 97
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 February 2012

Jorun Solheim and Ragnhild Steen Jensen

The importance of family firms for the development of capitalism, both past and present, has in recent years become widely recognized. Today there is a fast increasing…

Abstract

The importance of family firms for the development of capitalism, both past and present, has in recent years become widely recognized. Today there is a fast increasing body of literature about forms of family business and variations in family capitalism. Despite this new interest, few of these studies have made the family itself the focus of enquiry – and how different types of family structures and cultural traditions may influence the strategies and development of the family firm. Such connections are explored by comparing and discussing two cases of family firms and their history, set in Norway and Italy, respectively. It is argued that these two cases may be seen as examples of quite different ‘modes of familism’, with different implications for the running of an economic enterprise. These differences concern, first and foremost, cultural conceptions of gender, forms of inheritance, and the role of marriage in constituting the family firm.

Details

Firms, Boards and Gender Quotas: Comparative Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-672-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 April 2011

Andrea Colli

This paper seeks to provide a brief overview of what is business history as an academic discipline, with some reflection about its evolutionary patterns and heuristic…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide a brief overview of what is business history as an academic discipline, with some reflection about its evolutionary patterns and heuristic value in other fields, as for instance, management studies. A peculiar and increasingly practised subfield of business history is that of family business studies, which is thus a promising crossroads and meeting point for both business historians, practitioners and scholars in management studies.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an extensive analysis of the literature on family business studies in business history, this article highlights some potential areas of collaboration and suggests some reflections about the way in which the research methods of historians can be beneficial for management scholars.

Findings

Business history has in fact a high potential in providing, through its longitudinal and comparative approach, evidence for building new theories and challenging the existing ones.

Originality/value

This article tries to move a step beyond from the consideration of history as a repository of interesting evidence, to a new role for the discipline as an heuristic tool, and new chances of cooperation between historians and management scholars.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Abstract

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 April 2011

Lorna Collins and Nicholas O'Regan

This editorial seeks to provide an outline and reasoning for the launch of the new Journal of Family Business Management (JFBM). The paper explains how the family business…

Abstract

Purpose

This editorial seeks to provide an outline and reasoning for the launch of the new Journal of Family Business Management (JFBM). The paper explains how the family business subject area has developed in previous years and highlights the authors' views on where the subject needs to focus in future.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is an editorial with commentary on the family business subject area. It provides discussion about what is a family business; discusses the growth in family business studies; and highlights the need for family businesses to focus on competitive advantage.

Findings

Family business has evolved significantly over the past decade and today it is a well accepted and respected field of enquiry. In gaining academic acceptance, it has retained its practitioner roots. The paper argues that it is time for a re‐think because the focus of previous family business research has become somewhat convoluted with small‐ and medium‐scale enterprises research (at least in the UK) and with particular parts of the family business rather than the entire family business system.

Research limitations/implications

The paper argues that it is still the case that the proportion of family‐business‐related journals in relation to all business journals is small. Family businesses constitute the majority of global businesses and their contribution to the global economy is significantly greater than non‐family‐owned businesses. However, academic research on family businesses is still a new field less than 30 years old with many subjects and topics yet to be explored. This paper describes the approach the JFBM will adopt to address this imbalance and how it will focus on research that takes an inclusive, cross‐disciplinary approach to the study of family business management.

Practical implications

To continue its impressive upward trajectory, family business management and research needs to embrace new theoretical perspectives and approaches, particularly those that come from disciplines such as psychology, that at the moment have tenuous links to family business studies. It also needs to embrace learning that can be gained from practitioners and develop a useful discourse between stakeholder groups in the family business community.

Originality/value

This article highlights the contribution that this new journal brings to the family business subject area and defines the gap that it aims to fill. It will be useful for academics, researchers and family business practitioners, policy makers and professional business advisors.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

Carlo Mari

– The aim of this paper is to examine marketing practices within the bicycle industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine marketing practices within the bicycle industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes both primary and secondary sources to provide a retrospective analysis of marketing strategy at the largest Italian bicycle company.

Findings

The paper explains how marketing works at the Bianchi company and provides a detailed analysis of how it built its brand identity over time.

Research limitations/implications

Very few primary sources were available. There was neither a company archive nor other archives. For the most part, the paper is based on secondary sources.

Originality/value

The paper tries to fill the gap in current marketing literature that usually neglects the bicycle as a relevant topic, despite bicycle companies being a predecessor to the automobile industry. Moreover, the paper demonstrates that bicycle companies developed a rather sophisticated approach to marketing that is still in use.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Joerg Koenigstorfer and Andrea Groeppel‐Klein

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a study using photoelicitation interviews to investigate the relationship between the habitualised and unconscious…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a study using photoelicitation interviews to investigate the relationship between the habitualised and unconscious aspects of consumers' food choices, the front‐of‐pack nutrition labelling schemes on food products and the healthiness of their diets.

Design/methodology/approach

To this end, photographs of ten German middle‐class families at different stages of the family lifecycle were taken at the point of purchase (during a shopping trip made by the main person responsible for meal planning) and at the point of consumption (during a family meal at home). The paper used selected photographs as stimuli for photoelicitation. The interviews were recorded and analysed using a holistic approach.

Findings

Four themes concerning food characteristics, participants' food choices and their healthiness emerged from the data: perceived time pressure at the point of purchase; the relevance of nutrition information for making inferences with regard to the healthiness and tastiness of products; consumers' trust in nutrition information; and their use of this information at the point of purchase or point of consumption.

Research limitations/implications

Photoelicitation interviews allowed us to bridge the gap between researchers and respondents and to study what happens in real‐life situations when consumers go shopping and prepare family meals.

Practical implications

By putting nutrition information on food packaging, especially on the front of the pack, manufacturers and retailers enable consumers to make faster and healthier decisions at the point of purchase – i.e. as long as the consumers notice, understand, trust and like the labelling and use it in making their final decision. Front‐of‐pack labels are of less relevance at the point of consumption.

Originality/value

The paper provides a number of insights into the processes involved in making healthy (or unhealthy) food decisions. It also provides directions for future studies in visual research and in the fields of consumer behaviour, marketing and public policy.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2018

Andrea Nespeca and Maria Serena Chiucchi

In order to shed light on the implications of the business intelligence (BI) for management accounting (MA) and decision making, this study investigates as to how the use…

Abstract

In order to shed light on the implications of the business intelligence (BI) for management accounting (MA) and decision making, this study investigates as to how the use of the BI affects the production, transmission, and reception of performance measures (PM).

To investigate the issue at hand, a case study of an Italian company is carried out. The case study method is deemed suitable to explore the complex, penetrating, and unpredictable relationship between BI and PM.

The case analysis shows that the use of the BI can affect the production of PM by leading the organization to frame PM into an indicator setting. Moreover, the BI can affect the transmission by introducing a new, “visual” approach for presenting PM to decision makers, which is also relevant in the reception as a mobilizing factor.

This study contributes to improving the understanding of BI implications for MA and decision making, which is still limited in the accounting academia. Additionally, this research adds to extant knowledge about the relationship between measurement and management; more specifically, it contributes to understanding the “fate” of PM.

Furthermore, the findings illustrated in this chapter can be relevant from a practical point of view: by showing the role that BI solutions can play in producing and transmitting PM, the study shows the potential contribution of the use of the BI in managing and overcoming problems arising in these phases, favoring the use of these measures.

Details

Performance Measurement and Management Control: The Relevance of Performance Measurement and Management Control Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-469-5

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Giuseppe Valenza, Andrea Caputo and Andrea Calabrò

The field of scientific research on small and medium-sized family businesses has been growing exponentially and the aim of this paper is to systematize the body of…

Abstract

Purpose

The field of scientific research on small and medium-sized family businesses has been growing exponentially and the aim of this paper is to systematize the body of knowledge to develop an agenda for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting comparative bibliometric analyses on 155 articles (from 1989 until 2018) the authors provide a systematic assessment of the scientific research about small family firms, unveiling the structure and evolution of the field. Bibliographic coupling, co-citation analysis and co-occurrence analysis are adopted to identify the most influential studies and themes.

Findings

Four clusters of research are reviewed: succession in family SMEs, performances of family SMEs, internationalization of family SMEs and organizational culture of family SMEs.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the field of family SMEs by providing a systematic analysis of the scientific knowledge. Reviewing those clusters allows to providing avenues and reflections for future research and further practice.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 21 June 2014

Andrea Locatelli

The aim of this chapter is to investigate the meaning of terrorism, with a view to highlighting the main hurdles in the way of creating a working definition, as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this chapter is to investigate the meaning of terrorism, with a view to highlighting the main hurdles in the way of creating a working definition, as well as the necessity of developing definitions and classifications of this phenomenon.

Design methodology/approach

This chapter provides an overview of the literature on terrorism as a social/political phenomenon. It is therefore based on secondary sources.

Findings

While most literature on the topic finds it pointless or impossible to define terrorism, here we argue just the opposite. Common critiques of current definitions may be overcome by using multiple definitions and classifications.

Research limitations/implications

The chapter provides the methodological foundations for a comprehensive theoretical analysis of terrorism.

Originality/value of the chapter

The chapter applies insights from methodology of social sciences to the problem of defining terrorism.

Details

Understanding Terrorism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-828-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Andreas Folkers

The chapter analyses the role of smart grid technology in the German energy transition. Information technologies promise to help integrate volatile renewable energies…

Abstract

The chapter analyses the role of smart grid technology in the German energy transition. Information technologies promise to help integrate volatile renewable energies (wind and solar power) into the grid. Yet, the promise of intelligent infrastructures does not only extend to technological infrastructures, but also to market infrastructures. Smart grid technologies underpin and foster the design of a “smart” electricity market, where dispersed energy prosumers can adapt, in real time, to fluctuating price signals that register changes in electricity generation. This could neutralize fluctuations resulting from the increased share of renewables. To critically “think” the promise of smart infrastructure, it is not enough to just focus on digital devices. Rather, it becomes necessary to scrutinize economic assumptions about the “intelligence” of markets and the technopolitics of electricity market design. This chapter will first show the historical trajectory of the technopolitical promise of renewable energy as not only a more sustainable, but also a more democratic alternative to fossil and nuclear power, by looking at the affinities between market liberal and ecological critiques of centralized fossil and nuclear based energy systems. It will then elucidate the co-construction of smart grids and smart markets in the governmental plans for an “electricity market 2.0.” Finally, the chapter will show how smart grid and smart metering technology fosters new forms of economic agency like the domo oeconomicus. Such an economic formatting of smart grid technology, however, forecloses other ecologically prudent and politically progressive ways of constructing and engaging with intelligent infrastructures.

1 – 10 of 97