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Article

Anders Berger

Proposes to delineate a set of core principles from the Japanese kaizen concept and illustrate the contingent nature of the design and organization of continuous…

Abstract

Proposes to delineate a set of core principles from the Japanese kaizen concept and illustrate the contingent nature of the design and organization of continuous improvement (CI) processes, especially with respect to product/process standardization and work design. Given differences in the overall degree of standardization related to product design and process choice, two types of standards to reduce variability at operator work process level should be considered: indirect system standards, e.g. for skills, organization, information and communication; and direct standard operating procedures (SOPs). It is proposed that two team‐based organizational designs for CI (organic CI and wide‐focus CI) are functionally equivalent to the Japanese kaizen model, particularly when combining indirect system standards of skills with a group task design and low degree of product/process standardization. Expert task forces and suggestion systems are complementary organizational designs for improvement processes, particularly when work design is based on individual tasks and direct SOPs.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article

Anders Berger

Discusses implementation of commonly used change strategies. Putsthe emphasis on the problems of utilizing existing experience in theimplementation of a change strategy…

Abstract

Discusses implementation of commonly used change strategies. Puts the emphasis on the problems of utilizing existing experience in the implementation of a change strategy, and on the problems of transferring experience from one change effort to another. Provides a case description to illustrate these problems and the following discussion implies that part of the limitations are due to the linear logics and blueprint planning found in change programmes. Other suggested contributing factors concern the dynamic aspects of change and the problem of keeping different perspectives on change simultaneously in a development programme. Presents a preliminary model for analysing change programmes in a situation specific context. The model focuses on considerations made within and between three generic components affecting the implementation of change efforts; change strategy, change organization and change evaluation.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article

Horst Hart and Anders Berger

Presents a preliminary evaluation of an extensive corporate renewalprogramme directly encompassing some 70 companies in the Swedish branchof Asea Brown Boveri (ABB). The…

Abstract

Presents a preliminary evaluation of an extensive corporate renewal programme directly encompassing some 70 companies in the Swedish branch of Asea Brown Boveri (ABB). The renewal effort which is known as the T50 programme, is focused on reducing the total cycle times within most value adding chains including marketing, design, engineering and manufacturing. Preliminary results show that differences between companies are substantial with the leading companies well ahead of the corporate objective, while others have yet (after three years) only experienced minor improvements. Furthermore, the T50 concepts have been more difficult to apply to white‐collar work than anticipated which have contributed to limited success with respect to complete value‐adding chains. Describes and evaluates the T50 programme at corporate, company and workplace level and uses the programme history together with a national perspective to comment on the future of the programme.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article

Anders H. Wien

Previous research suggests that self-presentation causes people to have a reflective tendency to produce electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM). Drawing on the theory of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research suggests that self-presentation causes people to have a reflective tendency to produce electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM). Drawing on the theory of the reflective-impulsive model (RIM), this paper aims to examine whether self-presentation also could motivate an impulsive tendency to produce eWOM. Self-monitoring is suggested as a possible moderator in the relationship between self-presentation and impulsive eWOM production.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected based on an online survey of members from a consumer panel. The effective sample size was 574 respondents. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to analyze the data.

Findings

The findings show that self-presentation may drive both impulsive and reflective eWOM tendencies; however, that the relationship between self-presentation and impulsive eWOM tendency is contingent on high levels of self-monitoring.

Originality/value

By including self-monitoring as a moderator, this study is the first to show a relationship between self-presentation and impulsive eWOM production. Moreover, the findings show that both impulsive and reflective eWOM tendencies are associated with an enhanced tendency to produce eWOM, thereby demonstrating the usefulness of the RIM theory in understanding eWOM behavior. Overall, the findings shed light on how companies may stimulate eWOM production, and consequently provide insight into creating more effective eWOM campaigns.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article

Bernd Hoffmann and Karsten Paetzmann

This paper aims to present the rules for determining the net asset value according to the AIFM Directive which have fundamentally changed regulation of the European…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the rules for determining the net asset value according to the AIFM Directive which have fundamentally changed regulation of the European alternative funds industry. The paper discusses how these rules must be applied to ensure a reliable and objective valuation and to protect the interests of investors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon experience gained in the market following the implementation of rules on fund valuation in the European Union in 2011 and further in Germany in 2013. The valuation rules for relevant asset classes are presented and discussed in the light of the overarching goal of investor protection.

Findings

The paper’s findings show that the market participants saw the increased requirements as an opportunity and that they have adapted to the new system. This also applies to fund valuation, even though some people criticise terminology, lack of clarity and the complexity of the new valuation scheme from a practical perspective. Also, due to the increased valuation requirements, a consolidation among market participants can be expected.

Originality/value

The issues addressed in the paper are currently the subject of debate by regulators and market participants. There are direct implications for future prudential regulation in the asset management industry.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

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Article

Wondwesen Tafesse and Anders Wien

This study aims to examine how message strategy influences consumer behavioral engagement in social media. To this end, the study develops a comprehensive typology of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how message strategy influences consumer behavioral engagement in social media. To this end, the study develops a comprehensive typology of branded content in social media and tests for its effect on consumer behavioral engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of brand posts derived from the official Facebook pages of top corporate brands was double-coded using an elaborate coding instrument. Message strategy was operationalized using three main message strategies (i.e. informational, transformational and interactional) and their paired combinations. Consumer behavioral engagement was operationalized using consumer actions of liking and sharing brand posts. Proposed relationships were tested with MANCOVA and univariate ANOVAs.

Findings

Results indicate that the transformational message strategy is the most powerful driver of consumer behavioral engagement, while no significant difference is observed between the informational and the interactional message strategies. Further, complementing the informational and interactional message strategies with the transformational message strategy markedly enhances their effectiveness.

Practical implications

Useful managerial guidance to develop effective message strategies is offered. In particular, the importance of transformational messages, both as a standalone and a complementary message strategy, is underscored. By mastering and deploying transformational messages more frequently in their social media communication, marketers could improve their effectiveness.

Originality/value

Drawing on a theory-driven typology, this study sheds light on how message strategy shapes consumer behavioral engagement in a social media context. Importantly, the study documents pioneering empirical evidence regarding the effect of combined message strategies on consumer behavioral engagement.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part

Joshua Keller

The author introduces cultural consensus theory as a theoretical and methodological tool for examining the microfoundations of institutions by linking variance in…

Abstract

The author introduces cultural consensus theory as a theoretical and methodological tool for examining the microfoundations of institutions by linking variance in individuals’ micro-level conditions with cross-level variance in individuals’ adoption of macro-level socially constructed knowledge. The author describes the theory and methods, which include the use of cultural and subcultural congruence as cross-level variables. The author then provides an illustrative example of the theory and methods’ application for studying institutions, incorporating primary survey data of US-based ethics and compliance officers (ECOs). Results of the survey revealed variance in ECOs’ level of congruence associated with their direct communication with executives, their experience implementing ethics practices, and their educational background. Finally, the author discusses additional ways to use this approach for researching the microfoundations of institutions.

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Article

Claes Högström

The aim of this paper is to discuss the use of the theory of attractive quality and the Kano methodology in an experience context in order to understand how different…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to discuss the use of the theory of attractive quality and the Kano methodology in an experience context in order to understand how different experienced attributes contribute to delight and satisfaction among customers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applied theoretical and quantitative approaches in order to examine the theory of attractive quality and the Kano methodology. A total of 270 respondents responded to the survey instrument, which was based on qualitative interviews.

Findings

The research showed that existing questions and answering alternatives included in the Kano methodology must be adapted to the nature of experiences. The paper contributes in the form of a new evaluation table, having shown that existing tables were invalid in relation to the importance rating and the Must‐Be>One‐dimensional>Attractive>Indifferent evaluation rule. Finally, the paper also shows how hedonic attributes create delight and utilitarian attributes create satisfaction, which contributes to a holistic offering.

Practical implications

Managers should address the fact that simply including an attribute is not sufficient; they must also consider its nature and how it performs and attach to the offering when studying experiences to understand how it contributes to either delight or satisfaction.

Originality/value

To date, few studies have addressed or discussed the consequences of applying the theory of attractive quality and the Kano model – including its rules for classification – to experience‐based offerings. The present article does this and also offers a theoretical extension of the theory of attractive quality and service marketing in terms of how customers holistically consider value and how Kano survey results should be analysed.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article

Martin Löfgren, Lars Witell and Anders Gustafsson

The purpose of this study is to shed further light on the dynamics of quality attributes, as suggested by the theory of attractive quality. The study aims to investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to shed further light on the dynamics of quality attributes, as suggested by the theory of attractive quality. The study aims to investigate the existence of the life cycle for successful quality attributes and to identify alternative life cycles of quality attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on two surveys in which a total of 1,456 customers (708 in 2003 and 748 in 2009) participated in the classification of quality attributes. In particular, the study investigated how customers perceived 24 particular packaging attributes at two points in time, in 2003 and 2009.

Findings

The study identified three life cycles of quality attributes: successful quality attributes, flavor‐of‐the‐month quality attributes, and stable quality attributes. The research also extends the theory of attractive quality by identifying the reverse movement of certain quality attributes; that is, that a quality attribute can take a step backwards in the life cycle of successful quality attributes through, for instance, a change in design.

Originality/value

The paper provides empirical evidence for the existence of several alternative life cycles of quality attributes. The results of the empirical investigation increase the validity of the theory of attractive quality, which is important, given the limited amount of research that has attempted to validate the fundamentals of the theory of attractive quality.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article

Mr K. B. Gilkes has been appointed Marketing Manager for Berger Paints' vehicle refinishes. He reports to Industrial Marketing Manager W. S. Crisp.

Abstract

Mr K. B. Gilkes has been appointed Marketing Manager for Berger Paints' vehicle refinishes. He reports to Industrial Marketing Manager W. S. Crisp.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 3 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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