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Article

N. Meenakshi and Anamika Sinha

The purpose of this study is to understand the evolution, current competitive scenario, and future direction for the food-tech business in the Indian market.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand the evolution, current competitive scenario, and future direction for the food-tech business in the Indian market.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on press reports, industry reports, and secondary information about companies based on interviews of CEOs, analysts, industry trend watchers, and academicians.

Findings

The incumbents are competing on the basis of various parameters such as capital infusion (especially, funding), tie-ups with restaurants, customer loyalty, fleet size and management, and management of employees. High growth is driving volumes for all companies, although there is lack of differentiation in offerings. Companies need to build customer loyalty and seek diverse monetization models for profitability in the future.

Research limitations/implications

First, food-tech companies need to identify means of differentiation to gain competitive advantage. Second, customer loyalty is the key to long-term profitability and firms need to identify ways to build it. Promotions and offers cannot build loyalty. Third, firms would need to expand into different types of monetization methods, such as cloud kitchens, B2B food delivery services, to build revenues and profits.

Practical implications

Incumbents and prospective entrants in the food-tech industry need to understand the structure of the industry and the structure of competition to be able to succeed in the long term. They need to understand that promotions cannot be a differentiator and that funding will dry up. Therefore, it is critical to identify means of differentiation to build a loyal customer base.

Social implications

The food-tech industry in India has strong social foundation. More than 50 per cent of the Indian population is below the age of 25, the percentage of working population is increasing in India and so are income levels. In this context, the food-tech business is important as order outs are increasing. This, however, has also led to problems in the workforce for such startups as companies do not want to invest in employee training, safety or work conditions owning to high attrition rate because of the standardized nature of the job.

Originality/value

This paper makes an attempt to assimilate information about the progress of the food-tech industry in India in the last few years. It attempts to identify various factors that decide the nature of competition among incumbent players. It also identifies what factors these incumbents need to bear in mind while looking ahead.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article

Priyanka Dave, Anamika Sinha and Biju Varkkey

The paper attempts to establish cause and effect between an individual's motivation to learn, workplace learning and the in-role job performance of IT professionals

Abstract

Purpose

The paper attempts to establish cause and effect between an individual's motivation to learn, workplace learning and the in-role job performance of IT professionals

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses descriptive design, with a convenience sample of 531 respondents and uses Sobel's test to test for the mediating effect of Workplace learning on an individual’s motivation to learn and in-role job performance

Findings

It is found that individuals negotiate their own learning and development strategies. If HR designs on workplace learning are well designed, an individual's own motivation may have very little impact on job performance. However, workplace learning initiatives impact job performance very significantly. 10; 10;It was found that Workplace learning interventions significantly impact the relation between an individual’s motivation to learn and in-role performance. Independently, motivation to learn has very little predictability on job performance, but facilitated through workplace learning, it explains 23% of job performance. Work place learning on its own predicts 45% of job performance. An individual's motivation to learn predicts workplace learning by 36%. 10.

Practical implications

These findings can be used as a guide for HR professionals to negotiate training and learning designs, including informal and incidental learning initiatives in a holistic design. It can be used as a secondary source to build a case for training and learning investment.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies that has used Sobel's test for studying the mediation effects of Workplace learning on motivation to learn and in-role job performance of professionals in the Indian IT industry. The statistically significant results are an indication for industry leaders to take an action toward improving the learning architecture of firms using a blended approach to formal, informal and incidental learning interventions.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article

Anamika Sinha, Biju Varkkey and N. Meenakshi

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate applicability of design thinking in creating employee centric HR solutions. This application is studied in the context of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate applicability of design thinking in creating employee centric HR solutions. This application is studied in the context of a food tech company. A design thinking process for arriving at an HR solution for employee experience management is proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a single case study method. The HR professionals of a food tech company were interviewed to relate their narratives with the existing conceptual framework on design thinking.

Findings

It was found that the firm focused on the technological supremacy as well as developed an engaged and motivated team of delivery boys. This provided the required competitive advantage and growth. The first step in implementing the HR solution was to collect primary data for insights into the pain and gain points in employee’s day to day routine. Using the lens of empathy, multiple touch points through incentive policies, rewards, work engagement tools, feedback, inclusive decision making, and technology enabled learning solutions were designed. These signaled a caring and employee centric leadership and built future orientation and engaged the employees.

Practical implications

By demonstrating the applicability of design thinking and linking it to the HR solutions, a conceptual model relevant to the Food Tech industry was proposed. By integrating the process used to reach the solution, a modified model can be developed by other HR professionals working in any other Food tech company, aggregator/ service providers or logistics companies.

Originality/value

The study is among the initial studies to approach design thinking for HR solutions in a food tech industry.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article

Anamika Sinha, Biju Varkkey, Surajit Saha and Shiva Kakkar

The paper reports the practices and interventions adopted at a successful business transformation in an Indian family run organization. The firm deployed internal HR…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper reports the practices and interventions adopted at a successful business transformation in an Indian family run organization. The firm deployed internal HR marketing and large-scale interface to deliver results in terms of improved financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Single case study method and grounded theory approach was used to conceptualise the practices deployed to implement desired change. Multiple interviews and on-site observations were conducted and validated through different primary and secondary data sources to build the case narrative.

Findings

The results demonstrate how repositioning and rebranding of HR as strategic partner helped in building promoter and line manager buy in of HRM initiatives, build capabilities, controlled employee attrition, increased engagement and productivity, and eventually resulted in improved the financial performance of the company.

Research limitations/implications

The article is based on single organization in India. Hence, generalizability of the study is limited. The description and analysis provide insights about internal HR marketing and navigating the professionalising journey of traditional firms.

Practical implications

Scholars and practitioners working in the domain of internal HR marketing, employer/HR branding will develop a nuanced understanding of using internal HR marketing as a strategic tool for business realignment. The study also makes readers aware about the dilemmas faced by decision-makers during such transitions.

Originality/value

The study illustrates how internal HR marketing can be successfully deployed in family business environments and adds to both “family business management” “Internal HR Marketing” and “Employer/HR branding” literature.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article

Pradeep Kautish, Sunita Guru and Anamika Sinha

The purpose of this study is to survey the associations among innovation perspective on value priorities, i.e. hedonic vs utilitarian facets, satisfaction among customers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to survey the associations among innovation perspective on value priorities, i.e. hedonic vs utilitarian facets, satisfaction among customers and behavioral intents for online fashion apparels in the Asian economic context, i.e. Indian market.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used a hypo-deductive strategy and all the constructs were amended from the previous scholarly work. The two-step methodology with structural equation modelling in terms of covariance-based methodology was deployed to weigh the measurement and structural models.

Findings

The conclusions reveal that value priorities in terms of hedonic vs utilitarian dimensions have a substantial influence on satisfaction, and satisfaction significantly affects intentions for online apparels. Additionally, customer satisfaction performs the role of a partial facilitator between hedonic and utilitarian values and purchase intents. In comparison to hedonic, utilitarian priorities display a superior outcome on customer satisfaction and purchase intents for fashion apparels getting sold online portals.

Research limitations/implications

The research will facilitate online researchers and fashion managers recognize the underlying dimensions of innovation-led perspectives on values, i.e. hedonic vs utilitarian, for satisfaction and behavioral intents.

Practical implications

The study results will assist online marketers, fashion portals and specialists recognize the characteristics of hedonic vs utilitarian dimensions to improve satisfaction facets and behavioral intents for online fashion apparels.

Social implications

The present scholarly work presents useful insights related to social transformation with respect to innovative online fashion apparel buying paradigms.

Originality/value

In an Asian market context, the paper is pioneer work to examine the comparative relationships among value priorities, e.g. hedonic vs utilitarian dimensions and their influence on satisfaction and purchase intents for the fashion apparels sold online sector a two-dimensional measure of consumption values.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Case study

Anamika Sinha and Biju Varkkey

The case focusses on training conducted by a young professional in the capacity of an external trainer. The client organization, a mobile handset manufacturer, had…

Abstract

The case focusses on training conducted by a young professional in the capacity of an external trainer. The client organization, a mobile handset manufacturer, had multiple channels of sales. As a result, sales executives faced channel conflict and cannibalization from their own channel partners. Added to this was the aggressive competition from Android phone manufacturers. There were mixed signals at the organization and strategy levels, whereas the training was designed to focus on skill development. The trainer, without having carried out the TNA, agreed to deliver her training merely based on some discussions and mandates passed on to her. The outcome was a challenging situation: A mismatch between training content and participant demand.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

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Case study

Anamika Sinha and Biju Varkkey

The case discusses issues in the process of professionalising a family-owned manufacturing firm in the steel tubes and pipes industry. Set during 2008-2012, the case…

Abstract

The case discusses issues in the process of professionalising a family-owned manufacturing firm in the steel tubes and pipes industry. Set during 2008-2012, the case highlights the increased competition and the consequent growth in the sector that drives the need for professionalisation. In order to remain competitively relevant, the owners, who were followers of Jainism, had realised that in their business, all other things being equal, a company with trained and engaged manpower had an advantage in the market and over competition. With this thought, the firm initiated a blended training program. While mapping the activities related to employee training with outcomes at different levels, it found that though the reported Return on Training Investment (ROTI) was good, the company was losing out on intangible factors such as employee engagement and the belief system that had traditionally held employees together. Current practices had to change, thereby leading existing members to lose the belief they held in the company. The turn of events put both the owners and the HR department in a dilemma over the entire transformation initiative.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

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