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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Junaid Aftab, Huma Sarwar, Anam Amin and Alina Kiran

Leadership has a decisive role in the success of all types of businesses and firms, including small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and the ethical behavior of…

Abstract

Purpose

Leadership has a decisive role in the success of all types of businesses and firms, including small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and the ethical behavior of leaders is a key component which brings a sense of respect, fulfillment, trustworthiness and acceptance among the employees, which later become visible in their job performance (JP). This study aims to check the immediate effect of ethical leadership (EL) on employee’s JP (EJP) and also explore the indirect mediating effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on this EL and EJP nexus.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data was obtained from the employees of manufacturing SMEs of Northern Italy using a cross-sectional design from the end of 2019 to the start of 2020. This paper circulated 450 self-administered questionnaires using simple random sampling, and 202 (44.88%) valid questionnaires were returned. The PROCESS macro was performed using statistical package for social sciences to ensure whether or not EL affects EJP and is there any mediation effect of CSR present in this nexus.

Findings

The results indicate that EL has a strong positive connection with EJP and CSR. Interestingly, CSR positively influences EJP. Furthermore, the results also report the strong mediating effect of CSR in the nexus of EL and EJP.

Originality/value

This scholarly work seeks to contribute not only to the literature of EL and EJP but also enriches the understanding of this EL-EJP association by highlighting the indirect effect of mediating variable CSR in the SME sector.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Mohd Shukor Harun, Khaled Hussainey, Khairul Ayuni Mohd Kharuddin and Omar Al Farooque

This study aims to explore the corporate social responsibility disclosure (CSRD) practices of the Islamic banks in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries during the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the corporate social responsibility disclosure (CSRD) practices of the Islamic banks in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries during the period 2010-2014 and examines the determinants of CSRD and its effects on firm value.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the Accounting and Auditing Organization for Islamic Financial Institutions Governance Standard No. 7 guidelines and using content analysis, the paper develops a comprehensive CSRD index for GCC Islamic banks. The study applies ordinary least squares regression analysis for hypothesis testing and for finding determinants of respective dependent variables.

Findings

The results show a very low level of CSRD among the sample Islamic banks in GCC countries. When using corporate governance characteristics to examine the determinants of CSRD, this study provides evidence of a significant positive association between board size and CSRD practice in Islamic banks and a significant negative relationship of chief executive officer (CEO) duality with CSRD, as per expectation. For the economic consequences of CSRD, the study documents an inverse performance effect of CSRD while board size, board composition and CEO duality indicate significant positive effects on firm value.

Research limitations/implications

The relatively small sample size of GCC Islamic banks may limit the application of the findings to other Islamic financial institutions such as Takaful and the Islamic unit trust company.

Practical implications

The findings of this study initiate the global debate on the need for corporate governance reform in Islamic banks by providing insights on the role played by corporate governance mechanisms in encouraging and enhancing CSRD practices among Islamic banks. The findings also have important implications for investors, managers, regulatory bodies, policymakers and Islamic banks in the GCC countries.

Social implications

The results of the study do not support the idea that Islamic banks operating on Islamic principles can meet their social responsibilities through promoting corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities and by differentiating themselves from non-Islamic banks.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the determinants of CSRD in GCC Islamic banks using comprehensive CSRD and corporate governance variables and, therefore, adds value to the existing CSR literature in banking.

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2020

Osama Sam Al-Kwifi, Hamid Mahmood Hamid Gelaidan and Abdulla Hamad M. A. Fetais

Halal markets are rapidly growing in terms of market size and global coverage; therefore, there is a critical demand to have a deeper understanding of the consumption…

Abstract

Purpose

Halal markets are rapidly growing in terms of market size and global coverage; therefore, there is a critical demand to have a deeper understanding of the consumption behavior of Muslim consumers. This study aims to explore the influence of using the Halal logo on Muslim consumers’ attitudes toward food products using the neuroscience technology of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

Design/methodology/approach

The theory of planned behavior represents the foundation of this research, where consumer attitudes during an fMRI experiment were evaluated based on two different groups of images: images of just the Halal logo and images of meat labeled with the Halal logo. The study used the blocked design approach to track brain responses produced from displaying the two groups of images to study participants, where brain activity represents participants’ attitudes toward selecting the products.

Findings

There were no significant variations in brain activity when participants viewed Halal and non-Halal logos; in contrast, there were significant brain changes in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex region when meat images were labeled with Halal and non-Halal logos. This suggests that the Halal logo only has an influence on perception when it co-occurs with a product.

Research limitations/implications

Tracking Muslim consumption patterns is important for managers to be able to establish strategies to target Muslim consumers. This study uses a unique technique to study the behavioral attitude of a rapidly growing market segment, which can help marketing managers tailor their advertisement strategies to be more effective.

Originality/value

Previous research on the consumption of Halal products uses conventional approaches to study the influence of the Halal logo; however, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to explore the influence of the Halal logo on Muslim consumers’ attitudes using fMRI technology.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2010

Mervyn K. Lewis

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and structure of Islamic investment funds and evaluate their governance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and structure of Islamic investment funds and evaluate their governance.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology employed is the conceptual framework of Islamic economics.

Findings

It is found that Islamic investment funds have grown rapidly this decade: in Malaysia alone, the number of shari'a‐compliant funds has grown from 17 in 2000 to 149 in 2008, and at a global level there are 650 funds in operation. However, the industry has developed in a particular way, by focusing on negative screens, and removing from investments those activities deemed to be unacceptable to Islamic precepts, rather than pursuing as well the implementation of other aspects of the Islamic ethos.

Originality/value

The conclusion reached is that, if the Islamic investment fund industry is to provide more completely for the religious and financial aspirations of investors, it needs to go beyond the negatives and to also accentuate the positive and, drawing upon Islamic governance guidelines, actively seek out investments that have a positive impact on society and the environment and promote the welfare of the community. These issues hitherto have been largely unexplored.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Muslichah M. , Rose Abdullah and Lutfi Abdul Razak

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating effect of religiosity on the relationship between awareness and purchase decision of halal foods.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating effect of religiosity on the relationship between awareness and purchase decision of halal foods.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a convenience sampling procedure, 200 questionnaires were distributed to various local higher education institutions with a 64% response rate. A moderated regression analysis is used to test the relationship between awareness and purchase decision, with religiosity as the moderating variable.

Findings

As expected, the authors find that among the sample, the level of awareness toward halal foods is high, and that the effect of awareness on purchase decision is positive and significant. Importantly, they find that religiosity acts as a moderating variable on the relationship between awareness and purchase decision.

Research limitations/implications

First, the sample was taken from higher institutions only and respondents were selected using convenience sampling. Hence, it may not be fully representative of the Brunei Muslim population. Second, there may also be omitted variables not considered in the study. Third, the survey instrument and conceptualization of religiosity are both issues that may require further investigation in the literature.

Practical implications

The results indicate that awareness is an important antecedent of Muslim students’ intention to purchase halal foods. Marketers should design their campaigns focusing on creating awareness regarding their compliance with halal products. Moreover, food manufacturers and sellers should use the reliable halal certification and logo as a way to inform their consumers that their products are truly halal.

Originality/value

This study adds to the current limited knowledge of halal foods research. In particular, the authors investigate the moderating effect of religiosity on the relationship between awareness and purchase decision of halal foods.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

Maya F. Farah

The purpose of this study is to empirically investigate the effects of religiosity level, ethnocentrism, subjective norms, product judgment and trust in Halal food…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to empirically investigate the effects of religiosity level, ethnocentrism, subjective norms, product judgment and trust in Halal food products on the consumer intention to purchase a Muslim (manufactured in a majority Muslim country) versus a foreign (manufactured in a majority non-Muslim country) product available on the Lebanese market across the two main Muslim sects, namely, Sunnism and Shiism.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a quantitative survey that was administered to a proportionate stratified sample of 607 respondents from the two sects.

Findings

The results indicate that Sunni consumers indicate a greater trust in judgment of and willingness to buy foreign Halal products compared to their Shiite counterparts, while Shiite consumers display a greater trust in judgment of and willingness to buy Muslim products. Moreover, religiosity, ethnocentrism, subjective norms, brand trust and product judgment have been found to significantly influence consumer purchase intention.

Practical implications

The study results exhibit that religious sect plays a key role in consumer purchase intention, which encourages decision makers and marketers to pursue identity, awareness and communication strategies while targeting Muslim consumers of both sects.

Originality/value

Muslim consumers’ perception of Halal products is a sorely under-researched area of study with minimal empirical data supporting such studies. The results of this study offer some insight into consumer behavior differences between members of the two sects.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Darwish Almoharby and Mark Neal

This study aims to clarify current thinking about Islamic leadership by returning to the original texts of Islam, the Qur'an and the hadith. These are analysed to identify…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to clarify current thinking about Islamic leadership by returning to the original texts of Islam, the Qur'an and the hadith. These are analysed to identify foundational Islamic leadership prototypes, concepts and ideas. In so doing, the article provides original analysis of the foundations of Islamic leadership, so as to inform current debates about leadership in Islamic regions and communities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study consists of content analysis of the Qur'an and the hadith, to identify key concepts within these texts, concerning the nature of leadership. The methodological aim is to develop characterisations of Islamic leadership prototypes that are recognisable to practising Muslims today. In order to ensure this, the content analyses have been presented to academic seminar groups and conferences and refined through subsequent discussions.

Findings

Islamic leadership does not rely for its legitimacy upon traditional authority, but rather on rational-legal systems based on unity of purpose, acknowledgement of the one God, and the foundational example of Prophet Muhammad, whose referent and charismatic authority lives on in discussions of the sunnah and the hadith. It is thus vital to refine external or “etic” characterisations of Islamic leadership with an appreciation of leadership prototypes in the Qur'an, the sunnah and hadith.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of this study is limited by the subject matter, the investigation of leadership prototypes in the Qur'an and the hadith. This means that the consideration of historically more recent Islamic thinking about leadership has been left to subsequent study.

Practical implications

Implications for subsequent researchers are the need for critical clarity in discussions of “Islamic” or “Muslim” leadership. Another significant implication comes with the recognition of the overwhelming importance of the Prophet Muhammad's life and sayings in laying the parameters for the subsequent Muslim discussions of leadership.

Originality/value

This is the first use of content analysis to examine the foundational leadership prototypes and concepts embedded in the Qur'an and the hadith, and thus to analyse the Prophet Muhammad as a referent and charismatic leader, whose life set the parameters for the subsequent understanding of Islamic leadership.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 6 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2017

Philip Hallinger, Donnie Adams, Alma Harris and Michelle Suzette Jones

Over the past several decades, instructional leadership has gradually gained increasing currency as a key role of school principals throughout much of the world. This is…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the past several decades, instructional leadership has gradually gained increasing currency as a key role of school principals throughout much of the world. This is also the case in Malaysia where educational research, policy and practice have brought the instructional leadership role of the principal front and center. The purpose of this paper is to assess the conceptual models, research methods, and foci of scholars in the study of principal instructional leadership in Malaysia over the past 30 years.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic methods were used to identify all studies conducted in Malaysia that had used the Principal Instructional Management Rating Scale (PIMRS) (Hallinger, 1982/1990/2015) as the data collection instrument. This search yielded a database of 120 studies completed between 1989 and 2016 written in both English and Bahasa Malay. Common data were extracted from the 120 research reports, coded and entered into a MS Excel spreadsheet for analysis. Quantitative methods were employed to analyze modal trends and synthesize patterns in the data across the studies.

Findings

The search identified 120 PIMRS studies, 90 percent of which had been conducted since 2005. This represented a surprisingly large corpus of studies. Over 75 percent of the Malaysian studies of principal instructional leadership had been conducted as graduate (master and doctoral) theses, relatively few of which had achieved publication in journals. The authors’ analysis found that most studies had used lower order (i.e. bivariate, direct effects) conceptual models and relied heavily on descriptive and simple correlational statistical tests. The lack of consistent results within the database of studies was attributed largely to limitations in research design and quality.

Research limitations/implications

The 120 PIMRS studies conducted in Malaysia comprise a surprisingly large corpus of research on principal instructional leadership. Indeed, the Malaysian corpus is second only to the USA in terms of the number of PIMRS studies of principal instructional leadership. Nonetheless, limitations in the research models and methods employed in these studies suggest a need for stronger methodological training before Malaysian scholars can achieve the goal of contributing useful knowledge to the local and global knowledge base. Specific recommendations are offered for strengthening the quality of research.

Social implications

The recent expansion of higher education in Malaysia – like other developing societies – has yielded progress in the scope of research production. However, numerous challenges remain in transforming the potential for useful knowledge production from graduate research into reality.

Originality/value

This is the first review of research on principal leadership conducted in Malaysia. The review follows efforts by scholars to systematically identify the boundaries of knowledge in educational leadership and management within East Asian societies (e.g. China, Singapore, Vietnam, Taiwan and Hong Kong). Moreover, this is the first review of research that examines the use of the PIMRS in a single society.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 56 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Sharifah Hayaati Syed Ismail, Ilhaamie Abd Ghani Azmi, Sharifah latifah Syed Kadir al-Haddad, Siti Arni Basir and Idris Nayan

This paper aims to discuss the potential of al-Wasatiyyah (hereafter, AW) value concept for human sustainability (hereafter, HS) values and its applicability to civil…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the potential of al-Wasatiyyah (hereafter, AW) value concept for human sustainability (hereafter, HS) values and its applicability to civil service practice (CSP) in Malaysia. AW is a derivative of an Arabic word that means excellent, moderate, just and professional.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explains the potential of AW concept for HS both in epistemological and ontological perspectives with a focus on CSP. It focuses on the AW value concept according to Ibn Miskawaih and its applicability in CSP in Malaysia. Using content analysis and “integration perspective” between AW and contemporary Malaysia CSP practice, several questions were unlocked in this paper. They include the following: what are AW values for HS? What is the standard of value for sustainable CSP in Malaysia? And how HS from AW perspective can generate quality CSP in Malaysia?

Findings

It is found that AW can extend and enrich the meaning of value for HS and subsequently the civil service quality in Malaysia. Findings showed that AW can offer a holistic approach through four AW core values. The study also showed that AW is embedded indirectly in Malaysia CSP before it was highlighted under Najib Razak administration. This study suggests continuous emphasis on AW values in three service areas, namely, service requirements (SR), service priorities (SP) and service quality (SQ).

Research limitations/implications

The limitation is to bring the value concept into the HS parameters. HS is indexed by quantitative indicators including economy, health and education achievements, rather than value concept. This study tries to expand the potential and importance of value as an indicator for HS. That is through a concept named as AW.

Practical implications

AW values and approaches are perceived to be a potential focus system for HS and resource building in Malaysian civil service.

Social implications

Extending the meaning of HS through the application of AW concept is perceived to enrich social values and development.

Originality/value

This paper argues that current discussion on HS is not fit for all purposes because it lacks human great values. This paper subsequently argues AW concept as potential HS values, especially for CSP, in Malaysia.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

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