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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Inaam Altayeb Idrees, Ana Cristina Vasconcelos and David Ellis

The purpose of this study is to offer a theoretical and practical explanation for the nature and reasons for inter-organizational knowledge sharing across an informal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to offer a theoretical and practical explanation for the nature and reasons for inter-organizational knowledge sharing across an informal clique of competing five-star hotels in the Saudi Arabian religious tourism and hospitality industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is an adapted form of the grounded theory approach deploying a four-stage research design using qualitative interviews with key players in the industry to inform the analysis of the knowledge sharing approaches.

Findings

The findings illustrate the features of the knowledge sharing approaches across the five-star hotels studied. In particular, the findings highlight the existence of a cooperative-competitive tension in the relationships and knowledge sharing between the hotels. This illustrates the existence of a tacit strategy that cooperation can lead to long-term benefits for the competitor hotels.

Originality/value

The study is unique in its focus on the cooperative-competitive tension of five-star hotels in the Saudi Arabian religious tourism and hospitality industry and on this influence on the inter-organizational knowledge sharing across hotels within an oligopolistic market structure. The study also has value in using elements of oligopoly theory and of game theory, particularly, the prisoner’s dilemma, in explaining how inter-organizational knowledge sharing occurs within this market context.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Cristian Gherhes, Nick Williams, Tim Vorley and Ana Cristina Vasconcelos

Micro-businesses account for a large majority of small and medium enterprises (SMEs). However, they remain comparatively under-researched. The purpose of this paper is to…

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3624

Abstract

Purpose

Micro-businesses account for a large majority of small and medium enterprises (SMEs). However, they remain comparatively under-researched. The purpose of this paper is to take stock of the extant literature on growth challenges and to distinguish growth constraints facing micro-businesses as a specific subset of SMEs from those facing larger SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study consists of a systematic review of 59 peer-reviewed articles on SME growth.

Findings

Micro-businesses distinguish themselves from larger SMEs by being owner-manager entrepreneur (OME) centric and are constrained by a tendency to be growth-averse, underdeveloped capabilities in key business areas, underdeveloped OME capabilities, and often inadequate business support provision.

Research limitations/implications

The use of keywords, search strings, and specific databases may have limited the number of papers identified as relevant by the review. However, the findings are valuable for understanding micro-businesses as a subset of SMEs, providing directions for future research and generating implications for policy to support the scaling up of micro-businesses.

Originality/value

The review provides a renewed foundation for academic analysis of micro-business growth, highlighting how micro-businesses are distinct from larger SMEs. At present, no literature review on this topic has previously been published and the study develops a number of theoretical and policy implications.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Book part
Publication date: 23 March 2017

Barbara de Lima Voss, David Bernard Carter and Bruno Meirelles Salotti

We present a critical literature review debating Brazilian research on social and environmental accounting (SEA). The aim of this study is to understand the role of…

Abstract

We present a critical literature review debating Brazilian research on social and environmental accounting (SEA). The aim of this study is to understand the role of politics in the construction of hegemonies in SEA research in Brazil. In particular, we examine the role of hegemony in relation to the co-option of SEA literature and sustainability in the Brazilian context by the logic of development for economic growth in emerging economies. The methodological approach adopts a post-structural perspective that reflects Laclau and Mouffe’s discourse theory. The study employs a hermeneutical, rhetorical approach to understand and classify 352 Brazilian research articles on SEA. We employ Brown and Fraser’s (2006) categorizations of SEA literature to help in our analysis: the business case, the stakeholder–accountability approach, and the critical case. We argue that the business case is prominent in Brazilian studies. Second-stage analysis suggests that the major themes under discussion include measurement, consulting, and descriptive approach. We argue that these themes illustrate the degree of influence of the hegemonic politics relevant to emerging economics, as these themes predominantly concern economic growth and a capitalist context. This paper discusses trends and practices in the Brazilian literature on SEA and argues that the focus means that SEA avoids critical debates of the role of capitalist logics in an emerging economy concerning sustainability. We urge the Brazilian academy to understand the implications of its reifying agenda and engage, counter-hegemonically, in a social and political agenda beyond the hegemonic support of a particular set of capitalist interests.

Details

Advances in Environmental Accounting & Management: Social and Environmental Accounting in Brazil
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-376-4

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Inaam Idrees, Ana Cristina Vasconcelos and Andrew M. Cox

New PhD researchers sometimes face challenges when attempting to follow Grounded Theory principles to conduct their studies. These challenges may lead them to change its…

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3352

Abstract

Purpose

New PhD researchers sometimes face challenges when attempting to follow Grounded Theory principles to conduct their studies. These challenges may lead them to change its features or even prevent them from using the approach at all. This paper seeks to argue that, although challenging to implement, Grounded Theory is congruent with the nature of PhD research. It aims to provide an example of the application of Grounded Theory in a typically time‐limited PhD research project without the need to change any of its key features and principles.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents and discusses the research design adopted in ongoing PhD research which integrates the main guiding principles of Grounded Theory in a simplified four‐stage model of theory development.

Findings

The proposed model four‐stage research design includes: an uncertainty stage, where the primary focus is formed; an emergence stage, where the core categories, which are the foundations of the theory, emerge; an ambiguity resolution stage, where the grey areas in the emerging theory are clarified; and a maturity stage, when relationships between categories are defined and the theory is refined.

Originality/value

This research design can help new PhD researchers unfamiliar with Grounded Theory to develop a clear understanding of the process by simplifying and clarifying its main guiding principles, as well as guiding them to a clear, phased approach that takes into account the iterative and non‐linear nature of this methodology. It also places boundaries on the issues that should be dealt with within each of the phases of research adopting this methodology.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 63 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Ana C. Vasconcelos

This paper aims to discuss some of the debates that have surrounded knowledge management as a field since its inception in 1990s from the perspective of the dilemmas that…

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3807

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss some of the debates that have surrounded knowledge management as a field since its inception in 1990s from the perspective of the dilemmas that they have raised regarding: the notion of knowledge management as a field in relationship to other cognate fields such as information management, and the implications introduced by different approaches and perspectives on managing knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Problems and dilemmas brought about by the contribution of the following perspectives and strands of literature on knowledge management are discussed: organisational behaviour perspectives; strategic management perspectives; and economic‐ and accountancy‐based perspectives.

Findings

The explicit aim attributed to knowledge management by many authors of managing the transfer of tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge raises dilemmas that are re‐enacted and reconstructed in the above key approaches to knowledge management.

Originality/value

Beyond focusing on the classical debate on the nature of knowledge and whether it can be managed, these dilemmas offer avenues for reconsidering both the conceptual apparatus and the practical organisational intervention methods inherent to this field; this implies adopting different views and professional practices over what we understand by management, strategy, measurement and evaluation.

Details

Library Management, vol. 29 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

David Ellis and Ana Vasconcelos

This paper documents the continuing relevance of facet analysis as a technique for searching and organising World Wide Web based materials. The two approaches underlying…

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1580

Abstract

This paper documents the continuing relevance of facet analysis as a technique for searching and organising World Wide Web based materials. The two approaches underlying WWW searching and indexing – word and concept based indexing – are outlined. It is argued that facet analysis as an a posteori approach to classification using words from the subject field as the concept terms in the classification derived represents an excellent approach to searching and organising the results of WWW searches using either search engines or search directories. Finally, it is argued that the underlying philosophy of facet analysis is better suited to the disparate nature of WWW resources and searchers than the assumptions of contemporary IR research.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Lihong Zhou, Ana Vasconcelos and Miguel Nunes

This paper aims to present a study of Information Systems project risk management aimed at identifying a risk ontology and checklist that will enable decision making and…

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5034

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a study of Information Systems project risk management aimed at identifying a risk ontology and checklist that will enable decision making and mitigation strategy planning in information system (IS) development in the public sector. This sector is an ideal research field in risk management practices, due to the visibility that failure of IS/IT projects has acquired as a consequence of the duty of accountability that characterises it.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a qualitative approach anchored on a critical literature review, leading to the development of an analytical framework, followed by a thorough case‐study survey.

Findings

A project risk ontology was derived from the analysis of ten case‐studies in the UK, USA and New Zealand and was divided into five main categories: pre‐project, customer, project management, technological issues, and development methodology. The analysis found that a considerable number of risk factors are incurred before the start of the formal project and pre‐determine the future of the project and create predictable risks that can be avoided.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has focused on the pre‐implementation and implementation phases of IT/IS projects and further research into IS post‐implementation is required.

Originality/value

The proposed ontology is designed to fit in real life systems development cycles and is aimed at supporting risk assessment and control. The findings suggest that risk thinking should start early in the project and not, as many modern design and development methodologies propose, solely as part of the development process itself.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Alexander Schauer, Ana Cristina Vasconcelos and Barbara Sen

This paper aims to present a holistic framework, termed ShaRInK (Sharer, Relations, Institution, Knowledge), that depicts key categories of influences that shape…

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1490

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a holistic framework, termed ShaRInK (Sharer, Relations, Institution, Knowledge), that depicts key categories of influences that shape individual perceptions of knowledge sharing within an organisational setting.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory and qualitative case study strategy in which empirical data were gathered from 24 interviewees that were based in four different branches (i.e. China, The Netherlands, the UK and the USA) of a single information technology services organisation.

Findings

The findings led to a holistic framework that depicts four key categories of influences that shape knowledge sharing from an individual perspective: attitudes and characteristics of the sharers, relations between the sharers, institutions which act as a united entity on sharer perceptions and knowledge itself. Furthermore, the four key influences not only shape knowledge sharing independently but are intertwined and have a synergistic effect. The ShaRInK framework is formed by combining these.

Originality/value

The findings indicate that knowledge sharing from an individual-level perspective is a more complex phenomenon than currently portrayed in the literature. All four key influences, each being fundamentally different in nature, and their relationships should be taken into account. Equally, the ShaRInK framework can be applied by organisations when developing a knowledge-sharing strategy or auditing existing strategies.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Alice E Schofield, Barbara Anne Sen and Ana C Vasconcelos

– The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the intellectual assets within the Scholarship and Collections directorate at the British Library.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the intellectual assets within the Scholarship and Collections directorate at the British Library.

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenographic approach is used gathering data via 25 in depth interviews with directorate staff and stakeholders complemented by document analysis.

Findings

The findings identified issues specific to British Library such as the need for more clearly definitions of key business areas, and untapped resources within the directorate.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to a single directorate within the British Library. From the findings a balanced scorecard was developed for the directorate adaptable for all departments within the directorate. The model could be adapted for other organisations.

Practical implications

The study illustrates the value of adaptable scorecards allowing individual key performance indicators (KPIs) to be tailored to suit each department’s needs and ensure equal representation. Using the model would allow for internal benchmarking to take place.

Originality/value

This research presents a scorecard model that allows intellectual assets to be considered alongside traditional performance indicators and acknowledge the value of intellectual assets within the organisation.

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Understanding Industry 4.0: AI, the Internet of Things, and the Future of Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-312-9

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